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jonathangrimes / Jonathan Grimes

There is one person in jonathangrimes’s collective.

Huffduffed (14)

  1. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  2. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  3. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  4. Information Is Beautiful

    In an age of high-speed living and info overload, visualized information has incredible potential to help us quickly understand, navigate and find meaning in a complex world.

    The use of infographics, data visualisations and information design is a rising trend across many disciplines: science, design, journalism and web. At the same time, daily exposure to the web is creating a incredibly design-literate population. Could this be a new language?

    In his session, David will share his passion for this merging of design, information, text and story to unveil some of the interesting, unexpected and sometimes magical things that happen when you visualise data, knowledge and ideas. And, admitting that his book is as full of mistakes as it is successes, he’ll also explore some of the common pitfalls, traps and FAILS that dog this young design form.

    Using examples from his book and blog, he’ll share thoughts on what makes a successful information visualisation and journalistic tips, especially for designers, on how to zero in on interesting data and subjects—and how designing information can expose your own biases and change your views about the world. Oh yeah!

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/david-mccandless

    David McCandless is a London-based author, data-journalist and information designer, working across print, advertising, TV and web. His design work has appeared in over forty publications internationally including The Guardian and Wired. He champions the use of data visualisations to explore new directions for journalism and to discover new stories in the seas of data surrounding us. His blog and book ‘Information Is Beautiful’ are dedicated to visualising ideas, issues, knowledge and data—all with the minimum of text.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  5. Future of marketing: Gerd Leonhart

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  6. The Curious Ear: People First, Music Second

    The story of two Irish traditional music sessions; one in California, USA and one in Waterford, Ireland.

    http://www.rte.ie/radio1/doconone/docs_curiousear.html

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  7. Bill Drummond Talk

    cofounder of the KLF gives 130 years of music industry history and explains why music’s future might depend on not recording it (via @gnat, on trust)

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  8. On The Map 2: Mapping the Metropolis

    How do you make sense of a strange city and turn a bewildering maze of streets into a map that’s instantly informative to a confused visitor? Mike Parker hits the city streets to find out what makes the ideal map for steering us through the urban jungle. He meets the man who has made it his mission to single-handedly create a new map of Manchester, and discovers how digesting the entire London A to Z makes cabbies’ brains bigger.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  9. Tech Weekly: the iPad launch

    Join Aleks Krotoski, Jemima Kiss and Charles Arthur as they dig into the implications of the new Apple iPad, released last Friday, and already a huge market success. The machine, which has sold more than 2m units in 60 days, hasn’t yet found its killer app, but Jemima – who has one – and Charles – who doesn’t want one – predict it will transform the technological landscape.

    But don’t just take their word for it. Web user interaction expert Jakob Nielsen describes why in an interview with Jack Schofield. He also defines what developers need to know when designing portable touchscreen interfaces.

    And the numbers have it too: Apple beat Microsoft for the biggest technology company in the world. Charles tells the story behind the numbers, and explains why, in the future, Apple will remain top gun.

    The team also tackles the first real outcome of the controversial Digital Economy Act. Communications regulator Ofcom has published first draft of its proposed code of actions for copyright infringers. The three-strikes system is up for debate in the consultation that lasts until 30 July.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/audio/2010/jun/01/tech-weekly-ipad-launch

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

  10. On The Map 3: Motoring Maps

    The ultimate in cheap and ubiquitous mapping, there’s scarcely a vehicle in the land that doesn’t contain a dog-eared road atlas. Road maps and their digital descendent, the sat nav, may guide us efficiently around our nation’s highways but they don’t tell us much else about the landscape we’re speeding through. Mike recalls a bygone age of elegant motoring maps and considers how modern road mapping and its unrelenting emphasis on our motorways and trunk roads has changed our picture of Britain.

    —Huffduffed by jonathangrimes

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