jgarber / tags / history

Tagged with “history” (62)

  1. Gagarin and the lost Moon

    On 12 April 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became an explorer like none other before him, going faster and further than any human in history, into what had always been the impenetrable and infinite unknown. Raised in poverty during the World War Two, the one-time foundry worker and a citizen of the Soviet Union became the first human to fly above the Earth. Dr Kevin Fong tells the story of how 27-year-old Yuri Gagarin came to launch a new chapter in the history of exploration and follows the cosmonaut’s one hour flight around the Earth.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p09j922z

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. Music to land on the Moon by

    On the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landings, Beatriz De La Pava researches how real life events are reflected in the lyrics of popular songs, and shows how music can paint a vivid picture of the social, political, economic, and cultural landscape. She plays the music that chronicles the history of the space race, and speaks to the people who knew it, made it and loved it.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07hc88v

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Podcast Episode 343: Operation Cowboy - Futility Closet

    In April 1945, a group of American soldiers learned that hundreds of Lipizzaner horses were being held on a farm in western Czechoslovakia — and set out to rescue them before the Red Army could reach them. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll tell the story of Operation Cowboy, one of the strangest episodes of World War II. We’ll also learn about an NBA brawl and puzzle over a technology’s link to cancer deaths. Intro: What’s wrong with these Martian census numbers? Japanese puzzle maven Nob Yoshigahara offered this perplexing model. Sources for our feature on…

    https://www.futilitycloset.com/2021/05/17/podcast-episode-343-operation-cowboy/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. How the telegraph and the lightbulb can teach us to think critically about future inventions | CBC Radio

    In her new book, The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another, materials scientist and author Ainissa Ramirez chronicles eight life-changing inventions, and the inventors behind them.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark/how-the-telegraph-and-the-lightbulb-can-teach-us-to-think-critically-about-future-inventions-1.5520917

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. Psychohistory: Isaac Asimov and guiding the future

    100 years on from Isaac Asimov’s birth, Matthew Sweet looks at one of the bigger ideas contained in some of his 500 books; Psychohistory.

    The idea, from Asimov’s Foundation series, was that rather like the behaviour of a gas could be reduced to statistical probabilities of the behaviour of billions of molecules, so the history of billions of human beings across the fictional galactic empire could be predicted through a few laws he called ‘Psychohistory’.

    The idea inspired many to think that social sciences and economics can really be reduced to some sort of idealized set of physics principles, making future events completely predictable. It and similar ideas are still breeding enthusiasm for such things as data science, AI, machine learning, and arguably even the recent job advert by Downing Street advisor Dominic Cummings for more ‘Super-Talented Wierdos’ to work for government. But how do we see what is real and what is not, what is Sci-Fi and what is hype, what is reasonable and what is desirable, in the gaps between innovation and inspiration, restraint and responsibility?

    Jack Stilgoe of University College London has a new book out ‘Who’s Driving Innovation?’. Science and Tech journalist Gemma Milne’s forthcoming book is called ‘Smoke and Mirrors: How hype obscures the future and How to see past it’. Una McCormack is an expert on science fiction writing at Anglia Ruskin University, and Alexander Boxer is a data scientist who’s new book ‘Scheme of Heaven’ makes the case that we have much to learn about human efforts to deduce the future from observable events by looking at the history of Astrology, its aims and techniques.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p080lvrb

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW | Babbage from Economist Radio on acast

    Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.

    https://play.acast.com/s/theeconomistbabbage/babbage-pioneersofthewww

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. Poppy Northcutt, First Woman in Mission Control! - Offworld Episode 24

    We’re thrilled this week to be joined by Frances ‘Poppy’ Northcutt, who was a NASA Return-to-Earth Specialist during the Apollo missions and the first woman to work inside Mission Control! We talk about her experience as an engineer during Apollo, how the public remembers that era, and how media covered the moon landing.

    Thanks so much to Poppy Northcutt for joining us this week! You can watch APOLLO: Missions to the Moon on National Geographic on July 7th!

    Subscribe for more videos! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=testedcom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/testedcom Get updates on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/testedcom

    Tested is: Adam Savage http://www.twitter.com/donttrythis Norman Chan http://www.twitter.com/nchan Simone Giertz http://www.twitter.com/simonegiertz Joey Fameli http://www.joeyfameli.com Gunther Kirsch https://guntherkirsch.com Ryan Kiser https://www.instagram.com/ryan.kiser Kishore Hari http://www.twitter.com/sciencequiche Sean Charlesworth http://www.twitter.com/cworthdynamics Jeremy Williams http://www.twitter.com/jerware Kayte Sabicer https://twitter.com/kaytesabicer Bill Doran https://twitter.com/chinbeard Ariel Waldman http://www.twitter.com/arielwaldman Darrell Maloney http://www.twitter.com/thebrokennerd83 Kristen Lomasney https://twit

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr4YjCiabOc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun Feb 14 20:22:28 2021 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. Carole Cadwalladr: Facebook’s role in Brexit — and the threat to democracy | TED Talk

    In an unmissable talk, journalist Carole Cadwalladr digs into one of the most perplexing events in recent times: the UK’s super-close 2016 vote to leave the European Union. Tracking the result to a barrage of misleading Facebook ads targeted at vulnerable Brexit swing voters — and linking the same players and tactics to the 2016 US presidential election — Cadwalladr calls out the "gods of Silicon Valley" for being on the wrong side of history and asks: Are free and fair elections a thing of the past?

    https://www.ted.com/talks/carole_cadwalladr_facebook_s_role_in_brexit_and_the_threat_to_democracy

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. 50 Things That Made The Modern Economy: Radar

    How the high-tech ‘death ray’ led to the invention of radar. The story begins in the 1930s, when British Air Ministry officials were worried about falling behind Nazi Germany in the technological arms race. They correctly predicted that the next war would be dominated by air power. To address the problem, Britain launched a number of projects in hopes of mitigating the threat — including a prize for developing a high-tech ‘death ray’ that could zap a sheep at a hundred paces. But even though the project failed to develop such a weapon, it did result in something potentially far more useful that was able to detect planes and submarines – radar. And it was an invention that was crucial in the development of the commercial aviation industry.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csv3gn

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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