jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are sixteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (463)

  1. There’s still hope for building on the web - The Verge

    Nilay Patel interviews Paul Ford about his hopefulness in tech, his recent piece in Wired, and the state of building stuff for the web.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/6/20751655/paul-ford-interview-web-writer-programmer-vergecast-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. Clive Thompson: How Tech Remade the World | Commonwealth Club

    When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet.

    In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future. 

    Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired. 

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/clive-thompson-how-tech-remade-world

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Astronomer Andrew Fraknoi: 50 Years Since Our First Step | Commonwealth Club

    What Do We Know About the Moon?

    July 20, 2019 is the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the surface of the moon. In that time, the Apollo missions, a fleet of robotic probes and observations from Earth have taught us a lot about Earth’s surprising satellite. In this nontechnical talk, Andrew Fraknoi, who is sometimes called the Bay Area’s public astronomer, will look at the past, present and future of the moon, including its violent origins, the mystery of the frozen water we have found at its poles and its long-term future as it moves farther and farther away from us. Illustrated with beautiful images taken from orbit and on the surface, his talk will make the moon come alive as an eerie world next door, as a changing object in our skies, and as a possible future destination for humanity and its ambitions. Come find out how the achievements of the Apollo program fit into the bigger picture of our involvement with our only natural satellite.

    Fraknoi recently retired as the chair of the astronomy department at Foothill College and now teaches noncredit astronomy courses for seniors at the Fromm Institute at the University of San Francisco and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at San Francisco State. He also served as the executive director of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific for 14 years and was named the California professor of the year in 2007. Fraknoi appears regularly on local and national radio, explaining astronomical developments in everyday language. The International Astronomical Union has named Asteroid 4859 after Fraknoi in honor of his contributions to the public understanding of science.

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/astronomer-andrew-fraknoi-50-years-our-first-step

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. Poppy Northcutt, First Woman in Mission Control! - Offworld Episode 24

    We’re thrilled this week to be joined by Frances ‘Poppy’ Northcutt, who was a NASA Return-to-Earth Specialist during the Apollo missions and the first woman to work inside Mission Control! We talk about her experience as an engineer during Apollo, how the public remembers that era, and how media covered the moon landing.

    Thanks so much to Poppy Northcutt for joining us this week! You can watch APOLLO: Missions to the Moon on National Geographic on July 7th!

    Subscribe for more videos! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=testedcom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/testedcom Get updates on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/testedcom

    Tested is: Adam Savage http://www.twitter.com/donttrythis Norman Chan http://www.twitter.com/nchan Simone Giertz http://www.twitter.com/simonegiertz Joey Fameli http://www.joeyfameli.com Gunther Kirsch https://guntherkirsch.com Ryan Kiser https://www.instagram.com/ryan.kiser Kishore Hari http://www.twitter.com/sciencequiche Sean Charlesworth http://www.twitter.com/cworthdynamics Jeremy Williams http://www.twitter.com/jerware Kayte Sabicer https://twitter.com/kaytesabicer Bill Doran https://twitter.com/chinbeard Ariel Waldman http://www.twitter.com/arielwaldman Darrell Maloney http://www.twitter.com/thebrokennerd83 Kristen Lomasney https://t…

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr4YjCiabOc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 08 Jul 2019 20:52:36 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. 118: Aaron Gustafson - Semantic HTML: The Hard Parts | Full Stack Radio

    In this episode, Adam talks to Aaron Gustafson about authoring semantic HTML in the context of web applications, where choosing the right element can be a lot more complicated than it seems.

    http://www.fullstackradio.com/118

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. Planet Money – Episode 857: The Postal Illuminati

    When you order stuff online, it may cost less to have it shipped across the world than across the street.

    Take the Mighty Mug. It’s a travel mug that’s almost impossible to knock over, invented by a guy in New Jersey named Jayme Smaldone. A few months ago, Jayme realized he could order a knockoff Mighty Mug from China and get it shipped for less than it would cost him to ship his mug to a neighbor.

    The reason for this price gap, Jayme claims, is a secretive group of postal policymakers that meets every four years to fix international shipping rates. A kind of postal illuminati.

    Today’s episode: A conspiracy theory that’s actually real. How the decisions made behind closed doors make it cheap to buy things from across the world, but are also distorting the global economy.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2018/08/01/634737852/episode-857-the-postal-illuminati

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. Rethinking Technological Positivism with Cory Doctorow - CoRecursive Podcast

    Self-driving cars or armed autonomous military robots may make use of the same technologies. In a certain sense, we as software developers are helping to build and shape the future. What does the future look like and are we helping build the right one? Is technology a force for liberty or oppression.

    Cory Doctorow is one of my favorite authors and also a public intellectual with a keen insight into the dangers we face a society. In this interview, I ask him how to avoid ending up in a techno-totalitarian society. We also talk about Turing, DRM, data mining and monopolies.

    https://corecursive.com/33-cory-doctorow-digital-rights/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. Long-Term Thinking in a Start-Up Town (Ep. 381) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    Recorded live in San Francisco. Guests include the keeper of a 10,000-year clock, the co-founder of Lyft, a pioneer in male birth control, a specialist in water security, and a psychology professor who is also a puppy. With co-host Angela Duckworth, fact-checker Mike Maughan, and the Freakonomics Radio Orchestra.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/live-san-francisco/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. Computers at Home

    In the 1980s, ‘micro computers’ invaded the home. In this episode, Hannah Fry discovers how the computer was transported from the office and the classroom right into our living room.

    From eccentric electronics genius Clive Sinclair and his ZX80, to smart-suited businessman Alan Sugar and the Amstrad PC, she charts the 80s computer boom - a time when the UK had more computers per head of population than anywhere else in the world.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bnq0y

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. E47 - Building Technology that Augments Human Abilities with Amber Case

    Episode 47 of the Hacker Noon Podcast: An interview with Amber Case, cyborg anthropologist, user experience designer and MIT Media Lab fellow researcher.

    This episode of Hacker Noon is sponsored by Indeed Prime. Visit https://www.indeed.com/prime/hacke

    https://podcast.hackernoon.com/e/e47-amber-case/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

Page 1 of 47Older