jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are sixteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (471)

  1. Why We’re Watching Watchmen | The Nod

    This week, Eric sits down with Watchmen writer Cord Jefferson (The Good Place, Succession) to talk about what makes the show so singular in its unflinching look at race in America.

    https://gimletmedia.com/shows/the-nod/o2hwen/why-were-watching-watchmen

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. ‘One Giant Leap’ Explores The Herculean Effort Behind The 1969 Moon Landing

    In 1961, when President John F. Kennedy announced a goal of "landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth" before the end of the decade, the mission seemed all but impossible.

    "[The U.S.] didn’t have a spaceship that could fly to the moon," journalist Charles Fishman notes. "We didn’t have a rocket that could launch to the moon. We didn’t have a computer small enough or powerful enough to do the navigation necessary to get people to the moon. We didn’t have space food."

    There was even some disagreement about whether human beings would be able to think in zero gravity.

    Nevertheless, the race to the moon was on — especially after the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit Earth, on April 12, 1961. Fishman’s new book, One Giant Leap, tells the story of the ordinary people who mobilized behind the Apollo program to pull off the most extraordinary human achievement: the July 20, 1969, moon landing.

    Fishman notes that 410,000 men and women at some 20,000 different companies contributed to the effort. They designed, built and tested the spacecraft and equipment the astronauts used — often working by hand.

    "It was an enormous undertaking," he says. "It’s 10 times the effort to build the Panama Canal. Three times the size of the Manhattan Project. … Apollo was the biggest nonmilitary effort in the history of human civilization."

    https://www.npr.org/2019/06/12/731660780/one-giant-leap-explores-the-herculean-effort-behind-the-1969-moon-landing

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW | Babbage from Economist Radio on acast

    Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.

    https://play.acast.com/s/theeconomistbabbage/babbage-pioneersofthewww

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. The internet we lost — The Weeds — Overcast

    Function’s Anil Dash joins Matt to discuss how Big Tech broke the web and how we can get it back.

    https://www.vox.com/the-weeds

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: CubeSat

    How a student engineering challenge has changed the way we use space

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csz2wk

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Interface Message Processor

    The big metal box that made the internet possible

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csz2wx

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Clock

    The clock was invented in 1656 and has become an essential part of the modern economy.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04skkw4

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. How The NSA And U.S. Cyber Command Hacked ISIS’s Media Operation : NPR

    In August 2015, the NSA and U.S. Cyber Command, the military’s main cyber arm, were at a crossroads about how to respond to a new terrorist group that had burst on the scene with unrivaled ferocity and violence. The one thing on which everyone seemed to agree is that ISIS had found a way to do something other terrorist organizations had not: It had turned the Web into a weapon.

    https://www.npr.org/2019/09/26/763545811/how-the-u-s-hacked-isis

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. There’s still hope for building on the web - The Verge

    Nilay Patel interviews Paul Ford about his hopefulness in tech, his recent piece in Wired, and the state of building stuff for the web.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/6/20751655/paul-ford-interview-web-writer-programmer-vergecast-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Clive Thompson: How Tech Remade the World | Commonwealth Club

    When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet.

    In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future. 

    Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired. 

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/clive-thompson-how-tech-remade-world

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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