jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are sixteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (426)

  1. The moon and other things - This Is About - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    This is About…the unsung hero who saved the Apollo 11 moon mission in 1969. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things,” goes the famous quote from John F. Kennedy, “not because they are easy but because they are hard.” The little known story of just how hard the Apollo 11 mission was — and how close it came to disaster.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/archived/thisisabout/themoonandotherthings/7996706

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. The Doomsday Flight (Entry 372.AM0214)

    n which the U.S. government tries to ban a Rod Serling TV movie for inspiring too many mid-air extortions, all of which can be foiled by knowing the right trivia fact about Denver.

    https://www.omnibusproject.com/podcasts/the-doomsday-flight-entry-372am0214.htm

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. A Little Less Conversation

    Some people thought the laying of the trans-Atlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome—and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor of Dunbar’s Number; Nancy Baym, Microsoft researcher.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/10/people-thought-the-trans-atlantic-cable-or-facebook-might-bring-world-peace.html

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. Episode 7: Misinformation on the Internet - Untangling the Web

    How did the internet become a tangled web of misinformation? Miles speaks to danah boyd, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, founder of Data & Society, and Visiting Professor at New York University. boyd offers insight into the history of misinformation on the internet and the role social media plays in the proliferation of fake news. It’s an interview we did for our upcoming series on "junk news" for the PBS NewsHour.

    https://milesobrien.com

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. The Google Story with Matt Cutts @mattcutts | Internet History Podcast

    From Netscape To The iPad

    I figure most of you should know who Matt Cutts is, but if you don’t, let’s just leave it at this: he’s about to give you the best, most behind-the-scenes oral history of early Google we’ve gotten so far on this podcast. He was the head of Google’s web spam team for nearly 15 years. He’s also the current head of the USDS, so if you what to know what YOU can do for your country—if you’re in technology and you want to make the government work better—listen to this episode!

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2018/10/the-google-story-with-matt-cutts-mattcutts/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. In 1968, computers got personal: How the ‘mother of all demos’ changed the world

    A 90-minute presentation in 1968 showed off the earliest desktop computer system. In the process it introduced the idea that technology could make individuals better – if government funded research.

    https://theconversation.com/in-1968-computers-got-personal-how-the-mother-of-all-demos-changed-the-world-101654

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. The Web Is Agreement

    This presentation on web standards was delivered at the State Of The Browser conference in London in September 2018.

    https://adactio.com/articles/14321

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. Languages on the Brink – Can technology save our endangered languages?

    We can now record the world’s languages at an unprecedented rate, precisely at the moment they are most threatened. What does the future hold for language in the age of digital tech? At Melbourne Knowledge Week 2018, linguist and international guest of the festival Laura Welcher (The Long Now Foundation), Nick Thieberger (Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) and Paul Paton (First Languages Australia) get together to discuss the future of language preservation. Date recorded: 7/5/2018

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/knowledgemelbourne/languages-on-the-brink-can-technology-save-our-endangered-languages
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:22:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. Do We Need a New Internet?

    Britt and Ellie explore what the internet of the future could (or should) look like.

    All around the world, governments are increasingly looking at control of the internet; whether it’s to regulate content, hide or ban content or increase ownership of your data.

    Is this the opposite of what the internet was originally designed to be - a free, open and uncensored space?

    In this seventh episode, Britt Wray and Ellie Cosgrave meet the people who want to bring that dream back using their alternative internet networks. Together, they imagine what the internet could or should look like in the future.

    Cory Doctorow joins Britt and Ellie to navigate this huge subject as we meet former Wikileaks journalist James Ball, blockchain experts Stephen Tual and Juan Benet, Jilian York from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, security researcher Leonie Tanczer, Chaos Computer Club spokesman Linus Neumann, TOR developer Isis Agora Lovecruft and Mr C, co-founder of Hack Lab.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05y10x8

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Shipping: The ‘Invisible Industry’ That Clothes And Feeds You

    Imagine a ship carrying goods in containers that, if lined up, would stretch around 11,000 miles long, or nearly halfway around the planet. Rose George spent several weeks aboard one such ship as research for her new book, Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car and Food on Your Plate.

    She writes, "There are more than one hundred thousand ships at sea carrying all the solids, liquids and gases that we need to live." Yet, because we’re on land, they’re out of sight. Even people who make a point of ethical eating and shopping are usually unaware of the often poor working conditions for seafarers on these ships.

    George’s previous book, The Big Necessity, was about another subject that is largely out of sight: where human waste goes after you flush the toilet, and what happens in regions that don’t have plumbing. She tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross about who invented the shipping container and how the shipping industry affects ocean life.

    https://www.npr.org/2013/08/14/211981786/shipping-the-invisible-industry-that-clothes-and-feeds-you

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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