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jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are fifteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (272)

  1. Rise of the machines: who is the ‘internet of things’ good for? – podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    Interconnected technology is now an inescapable reality – ordering our groceries, monitoring our cities and sucking up vast amounts of data along the way. The promise is that it will benefit us all – but how can it?

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2017/jun/19/rise-of-the-machines-who-is-the-internet-of-things-good-for-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. Tuesday, 6/20/2017 — The Outline World Dispatch — Overcast

    It’s Tuesday. We have just one story for you today: William Turton - Inside Apple’s global war on leakers Hosted by Adrianne Jeffries. Produced by John Lagomarsino.

    https://overcast.fm/+I0hy5PQco

    download

    Tagged with apple

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Smithsonian Second Opinion: Forging the Future

    Smithsonian Institution Secretary Dr. David Skorton joins some of the world’s leading thinkers in a spirited discussion about our ever changing planet.

    Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton, M.D., asks: Given the impact on the planet that the rise of the human species has already had over the past millennia – the dawn of agriculture, land and water use, emerging diseases, climate change, species extinction and other challenges – is there reason to be optimistic about the future of Earth, and our place in it? Will our species have the ideas, means, and the will to successfully adapt to this upcoming era of global change?

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEZ2Cux5E-c
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 16 Jun 2017 23:50:11 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. On the Arpanet - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     The fourth and final segment of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/on-the-arpanet

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. The Demonstration - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part three of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/the-demonstration

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. Support from ARPA - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part two of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/support-from-arpa

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. Developing the Underlying Concepts for Contemporary Computing - Computing Lives - IEEECS

    A discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/developing-the-underlying-concepts-for-contemporary-computing

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. The First Computer Dating

    In 1959, two Stanford undergraduate electrical engineering students enrolled in Math 139, Theory and Operation of Computing Machines, and as a final class project, devised the first known attempt at computer dating.

    From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs-the "Computing Lives" Podcast of selected articles from the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing cover the breadth of computer history. This Podcast series features scholarly accounts by leading computer scientists and historians, as well as firsthand stories by computer pioneers.

    You can also get more computing history with IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. Presentable #25: The Tenuous Resilience of the Open Web - Relay FM

    Author and designer Jeremy Keith talks about his new book, Resilient Web Design, and why we keep making the same mistakes over and over.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/25

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Spreading The Word About The ‘Mother Of Wi-Fi’ - Science Friday

    Credit: [Public Domain] via WikicommonsCalled “the most beautiful woman in the world,” actress Hedy Lamarr was renowned for her looks. But she had a brilliant, inventive mind that she rarely got credit for until very close to the end of her life. Working with composer George Antheil, she patented the frequency-hopping, or spread-spectrum technology that now powers wireless internet, cell phones, and GPS. While Hedy didn’t receive acknowledgement for the invention until 1997, her contribution is getting more attention these days, like in the documentary “Bombshell,” which showed at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. Actress Diane Kruger, who narrated “Bombshell” and who’s working on turning the story into a television miniseries, talks to Ira about the inspiration she hopes Lamarr can offer young girls.

    And Richard Rhodes, who chronicled Lamarr’s biography in his 2011 book, “Hedy’s Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr,” joins Kruger to tell the tale of the “mother of Wi-Fi.”

    https://sciencefriday.com/segments/spreading-the-word-about-the-mother-of-wi-fi/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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