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jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are sixteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (406)

  1. The Digital Human: Friction

    Aleks Krotoski explores the unforeseen consequences of a frictionless digital life.

    It’s the life we’re told we want, where we just shout at a device and our needs are met as quickly as the supply chain allows. Aleks Krotoski explores frictionless digital living.

    But is there value in friction? Aleks hears from someone who’s life depends on it, mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick. He has a reputation for stacking the odds against himself as much as possible; long routes, often climbed alone in the worst of conditions. Back on the ground Andy also needs friction to not get complacent, accept others views without question, to keep moving forward.

    Without friction we risk falling prey to what economist Umair Haque describes as the infantilisation economy. One where we are diminished by being able to have our every need met by Amazon’s Alexa. And the cost isn’t just to us but also to the army of digital serfs peddling about in all weathers with those trademark boxes on their backs. Its a future that was foreseen as far back as the late 19th century by the likes of Nietzsche in his descriptions of the ‘last men’ a humanity living the most vanilla of existences without challenge or ambition to change.

    Nothing sums this up better than the food replacement industry. No time to shop, cook, chew? Get everything you need nutritionally in a drink like Soylent or Huel - all in the name of efficiency. Its a world that fascinates anthropologist Jan English-Luek who for over 20 years has been observing trends in silicon valley.

    Ultimately Aleks will ask what we’re saving all this time and effort for and do we ever reap the benefits? Or does it just keep us where the digital world wants us, consuming in ever more efficient ways.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b3c76x

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. Vinyl Assault Vehicle w/Butch, 11/15/17 on WERA-LP, wera.fm w/guest violinist James Wolf

    One hundred years of underground sound. Rock, jazz, psych, funk, indie rock, dub, classical, world, metal, ambient and the artists that make Arlington and DC famous. The 11/08/17 edition, with special guest, violinist James Wolf. James talks about his work with the VHF records artists From Quagmire and Fern Knight, his recent solo work on Verses Records and his wide-ranging work with groups like the Orchid, Phoenix Auto Group, Laconic Chamber and more. Two hours of experimental violin, the Beach Boys and even Sun Ra.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.mixcloud.com/squealermusic/vinyl-assault-vehicle-wbutch-111517-on-wera-lp-werafm-wguest-violinist-james-wolf/
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 19 May 2018 18:29:54 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Liz Reed | NEA

    Cartoonist and multimedia artist Liz Reed is co-creator with her husband Jimmy of Cuddles and Rage—it’s a world inhabited by food with quirky personalities. Liz calls it “disturbingly cute,” which seems about right. In one-panel cartoons, dioramas, and animated short videos, Liz and Jimmy Reed create work that is cute—but it always has a twist. Take Dr. Taquito—a serial killer of food, who gives cooking lessons—ruthlessly shredding lettuce and chopping tomatoes as the poor vegetable victims try to get away. It’s an unashamedly playful and dark imaginative work. In today’s podcast, Liz takes through the creation and evolution of the singular world of Cuddles and Rage.

    https://www.arts.gov/audio/liz-reed

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. The Far Future

    How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to.

    If our tech society continues then we can leave data for future generations in huge, mundane quantities, detailing our every tweet and Facebook ‘like’. But how long could this information be stored? And if society as we know it ends, will our achievements vanish with it? How do we plan for and protect those who will be our distant descendants and yet may have hopes, fears, languages, beliefs, even religions that we simply cannot predict? What if anything can we, should we, pass on?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05sxgvj

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. The Far Future, Seriously… - BBC Radio 4

    How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05sxgvj
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 07 May 2018 20:07:51 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. Episode 52 - Going Offline | with Jeremy Keith - Relative Paths

    We talked to Clearleft co-founder, author and speaker Jeremy Keith about service workers and his recently released A Book Apart book, Going Offline.

    Coming into this episode I didn’t really know much about service workers. I assumed there were very specific use cases for them, but Jeremy opened our eyes to the fact that they allow access to some very powerful browser features and are useful across the board.

    We also spoke about Jeremy’s recently released A Book Apart Book ‘Going Offline’, I’m really enjoying it. I can’t put it any better than Sarah Drasner (https://sarahdrasnerdesign.com), who said:

    "Jeremy Keith explains service workers with kindness, clarity, and humour in his new book, a must-read for any web developer who wants to learn this exciting new API and enable offline experiences for their applications."

    The first chapter is available as an A List Apart article, link below.

    There were some strong Jukebox Entries this time. Jeremy Chose Catastrophe And The Cure by Explosions In The Sky, from one of my very favourite albums. Ben chose The Celestial Garden by DrumTalk but apparently described a different track in the episode, he’s a sleep deprived new dad so we’ll have mercy on him for that. My pick was Bashed Out by This Is The Kit, a lovely bitter sweet track.

    https://relativepaths.uk/ep52-going-offline-with-jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. The Web of Future Past with John Allsopp

    In this episode of devMode.fm, we talk to web veteran & founder of the Web Directions conference, John Allsopp. We talk about the origins of the web, including many technologies you may never have heard of. John drops some fantastic tidbits from the perspective that only someone who has seen it all can offer.

    We also meander through a philosophical discussion of the current and future state of the web development industry. Are certain jobs in the web development world in danger of becoming obsolete? Join us for a fun and far-ranging discussion!

    https://devmode.fm/episodes/the-web-of-future-past-with-john-allsopp

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. Episode 126: How Ann Boleyn gave us our right to privacy • DecodeDC

    What do Ann Boleyn and Henry VIII have to do with Roe v Wade and a right to privacy?

    http://www.decodedc.com/126/

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. “2001: A Space Odyssey”: What It Means, and How It Was Made | The New Yorker

    Fifty years ago, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke set out to make a new kind of sci-fi. How does their future look now that it’s the past?

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/23/2001-a-space-odyssey-what-it-means-and-how-it-was-made

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Track Changes: Who Really Made The Internet?: Claire L. Evans on Tech History

    How did cyberpunks and activists affect the tech industry? Do we understand the history of the internet? How much of what we know comes only from a man’s perspective? This week, Claire L. Evans tells us about her new book, Broad Band, and the women who created the internet.

    There Were Women In The Room: This week Paul Ford and Gina Trapani sit down with Claire L. Evans to chat about her new book,

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. We discuss the impact of online communities, how weird the dot-com era was, and the stories of the women who made things work. We also get a window into Y△CHT’s future project — the Broad Band Musical!

    2:29 — Claire: “[This book is] a corrective if you will, of all the books we’ve all read and love about Silicon Valley, and the garage-to-riches stories of entrepreneurship… These are the stories about the women who were in the room the whole time, and nobody asked about them.”

    5:06 — Paul: “Women get forgotten from activist histories too, and it was kind of an activist scene in the early days.”

    5:22 — Gina: “Weird was welcome, in a way that is no longer the case.”

    7:03 — Claire: “My big takeaway is how little we value long-term care and maintenance when it comes to building things… I profile Stacy Horn, who founded Echo BBS in the late 90s. It still exists. And she has devoted 25 years of her life to fostering and caring for this community. … She’s taking care of something, because she’s responsible for a community, and I think that’s really beautiful.”

    8:24— Claire: “We mythologize the box, but it’s the users that change the world; it’s what you do with it. The culture work, the development of making things worth linking is almost as important as making the conventions for linking.

    8:24 — Gina: “It’s broadening the definition of what making the web was. It wasn’t just about standardizing protocols and running code, it was about building the places where people wanted to come and connect and share.”

    9:07— Paul: “Moderation…it’s critical, it’s key to these communities but it doesn’t get as much appreciation as ‘I wrote a page of code.’”

    20:51 — Claire: “We’re all very siloed in the contemporary media landscape.”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/who-really-made-the-internet-claire-l-evans-on-techhistory

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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