jgarber / Jason Garber

Web developer, musician, photographer, author, and suspect patent holder.

There are sixteen people in jgarber’s collective.

Huffduffed (420)

  1. The Web Is Agreement

    This presentation on web standards was delivered at the State Of The Browser conference in London in September 2018.

    https://adactio.com/articles/14321

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  2. Languages on the Brink – Can technology save our endangered languages?

    We can now record the world’s languages at an unprecedented rate, precisely at the moment they are most threatened. What does the future hold for language in the age of digital tech? At Melbourne Knowledge Week 2018, linguist and international guest of the festival Laura Welcher (The Long Now Foundation), Nick Thieberger (Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) and Paul Paton (First Languages Australia) get together to discuss the future of language preservation. Date recorded: 7/5/2018

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/knowledgemelbourne/languages-on-the-brink-can-technology-save-our-endangered-languages
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:22:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  3. Do We Need a New Internet?

    Britt and Ellie explore what the internet of the future could (or should) look like.

    All around the world, governments are increasingly looking at control of the internet; whether it’s to regulate content, hide or ban content or increase ownership of your data.

    Is this the opposite of what the internet was originally designed to be - a free, open and uncensored space?

    In this seventh episode, Britt Wray and Ellie Cosgrave meet the people who want to bring that dream back using their alternative internet networks. Together, they imagine what the internet could or should look like in the future.

    Cory Doctorow joins Britt and Ellie to navigate this huge subject as we meet former Wikileaks journalist James Ball, blockchain experts Stephen Tual and Juan Benet, Jilian York from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, security researcher Leonie Tanczer, Chaos Computer Club spokesman Linus Neumann, TOR developer Isis Agora Lovecruft and Mr C, co-founder of Hack Lab.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05y10x8

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  4. Shipping: The ‘Invisible Industry’ That Clothes And Feeds You

    Imagine a ship carrying goods in containers that, if lined up, would stretch around 11,000 miles long, or nearly halfway around the planet. Rose George spent several weeks aboard one such ship as research for her new book, Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car and Food on Your Plate.

    She writes, "There are more than one hundred thousand ships at sea carrying all the solids, liquids and gases that we need to live." Yet, because we’re on land, they’re out of sight. Even people who make a point of ethical eating and shopping are usually unaware of the often poor working conditions for seafarers on these ships.

    George’s previous book, The Big Necessity, was about another subject that is largely out of sight: where human waste goes after you flush the toilet, and what happens in regions that don’t have plumbing. She tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross about who invented the shipping container and how the shipping industry affects ocean life.

    https://www.npr.org/2013/08/14/211981786/shipping-the-invisible-industry-that-clothes-and-feeds-you

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  5. Friends Talk Frontend #26: Jeremy Keith (Part 1)

    Jeremy Keith is a web developer, author, and musician. We talk about the history of computing and his new book Going Offline.

    https://overcast.fm/+IznV-R-Xc

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  6. Rosalind Franklin

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the pioneering scientist Rosalind Franklin (1920 - 1958). During her distinguished career, Franklin carried out ground-breaking research into coal and viruses but she is perhaps best remembered for her investigations in the field of DNA. In 1952 her research generated a famous image that became known as Photograph 51. When the Cambridge scientists Francis Crick and James Watson saw this image, it enabled them the following year to work out that DNA has a double-helix structure, one of the most important discoveries of modern science. Watson, Crick and Franklin’s colleague Maurice Wilkins received a Nobel Prize in 1962 for this achievement but Franklin did not and today many people believe that Franklin has not received enough recognition for her work.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09rzm9y

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  7. Going Offline: Service Workers with Jeremy Keith

    We have special guest Jeremy Keith from ClearLeft to discuss Service Workers: what they are, how users can benefit from them, and how we implement them. Jeremy authored the book “Going Offline” which goes into glorious detail on the subject, so he’s well positioned to discuss the topic.

    We talk about how using a Service Worker can beneficially impact the user experience by allowing your website to still function despite spotty or no Internet connection at all. We also delve into many practical applications of the technology.

    We discuss how in-browser technologies like Service Workers allow websites to act more like “apps”, how Service Workers are installed, and how they are like a virus, a toolbox, and a duckbilled platypus at once.

    https://devmode.fm/episodes/going-offline-service-workers-with-jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  8. Fermi’s Paradox - This American Life

    Three people grapple with the question, “Are we alone?”

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/617/fermis-paradox

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. Episode 54 - Gatekeepers | The Just Problem - Relative Paths

    This week we discussed dealing with the problem of gatekeeping in the web industry, the tendency to deploy dogmatic or arbitrary standards to keep people out.

    https://relativepaths.uk/ep54-gatekeepers-and-the-just-problem

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Slice of PIE: a linguistic common ancestor – Science Weekly podcast | Science | The Guardian

    Nicola Davis explores the hypothetical common ancestor of modern Indo-European languages and asks, where did it come from? How and why did it spread? And do languages evolve like genes?

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2018/jun/29/slice-of-pie-proto-indo-european-linguistic-common-ancestor-science-weekly-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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