jessewillis / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (16)

  1. Cory Doctorow on Poverty, Privacy, and Our Relationship With Technology ‹ Literary Hub

    In this episode of A Phone Call From Paul, Paul Holdengraber welcomes Cory Doctorow to America, discusses how privacy is a vanishing idea, and what is going to happen to our brains in the future…

    Cory Doctorow on welfare and poverty…

    The kind of social welfare infrastructure we have now compared to the postwar infrastructure is so anemic. And the view of people who participate in social welfare is so vituperative. The hate reserved for the poor, especially in the United Kingdom, is so venomous, that it’s really kind of hard to understand except as the kind of hatred that people have for things that they fear more than things that they despise. I think there’s this view, maybe, that all of us, rather than being millionaires in waiting, are refugees in waiting, and when we see people who are becoming internal economic refugees, or who are traditional refugees coming from places like Syria, I think we see an uncomfortable future for ourselves.

    Cory Doctorow on standardized testing…

    I think that standardized testing—as someone who was raised by teachers—standardizing testing, to me, is grotesque. It treats education as a kind of business whose product is standardized productive humans as opposed to something that does this varied and Socratic business of learning. And I think that standardized testing is part and parcel of the idea that teachers cant’ be trusted, and that teachers, as people who are on the public payroll, are doing something that is innately suspicious and have to be monitored and made accountable, as though finding out whether or not the quantifiable parts of education are performing well tells you anything about how the qualitative parts of education are performing.

    Cory Doctorow on the collective action problem…

    The collective action problem—the deadlock… It’s the Bernie Sanders problem, it’s the Lawrence Lessig problem. This is the problem that you and everybody else need to coordinate your action in order to solve something that all of you are suffering under, and you all agree, but you can’t figure out how to coordinate. That is, I think, the wicked problem of our age. And it’s one that technology has some really interesting things to say about.

     

     

    A Phone Call From PaulCory DoctorowPaul HoldengraberpodcastsprivacytechnologyThe Internet

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    http://lithub.com/cory-doctorow-on-poverty-privacy-and-our-relationship-with-technology/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  2. Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson(MUST WATCH!!!)

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BHQIasisqY
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  3. Sigourney Weaver on Alien: Isolation, horror and computer games – Tech Weekly podcast | Technology | theguardian.com

    Ahead of the release of Alien: Isolation, this special edition of Tech Weekly looks at the resurgence of the horror genre in computer gaming

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2014/oct/01/sigourney-weaver-alien-isolation-horror-computer-games-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  4. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  5. Reading Envy: Reading Envy Podcast 002: Return of the Euthanized Book

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  6. James Burke – 1 1 = 3

    Journalist and academic Aleks Krotoski presents the second of her three guest curated events on the theme of ‘Connections’.

    James Burke takes a sideways look at the connective nature of innovation and its social effects. Two ideas come together to produce something that is greater than the sum of the parts. The result is almost a surprise (in the way, for instance, the first typewriters boosted the divorce rate!).

    Innovation has usually attempted to solve some aspect of the problem with which we have lived for two million tool-using years: scarcity. As a result, our institutions, value systems, modes of thought and behaviour have all been shaped by the fact that there’s never been enough of everything to go around.

    However, thanks to the internet and a radically-accelerated rate of connective, inter-disciplinary innovation, we may be on the verge of solving the problem of scarcity once and for all. In ways that may really surprise us. What will abundance do to us? And how should we prepare for it?

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  7. The Big Ideas podcast: The medium is the message

    In the first of a series of philosophy podcasts, Benjamen Walker and guests discuss the communication theorist Marshall McLuhan and his most famous line.

    The writing of the Canadian philosopher Marshall McLuhan, who would have celebrated his 100th birthday this Thursday, has entered popular jargon like that of few other modern intellectuals. Is there another line that has been quoted – and misquoted – as enthusiastically as ‘the medium is the message’? McLuhan, of course, was perfectly aware of his status as the thinker du jour of the media age, the man everyone liked to quote over dinner but hadn’t bothered to read – for proof, just watch Annie Hall.

    But what does "the medium is the message" really mean? In the first episode of our new The Big Ideas series, Benjamen Walker gets to the bottom of the slogan with the help of Canadian novelist and McLuhan-biographer Douglas Coupland, academic Lance Strate, Marshal’s son Eric McLuhan, record producer John Simon, and the Guardian’s media correspondent Jemima Kiss.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/audio/2011/jul/20/big-ideas-podcast-medium-message

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  8. An acclaimed Apple critic made up the details | Marketplace from American Public Media

    The monologist Mike Daisey’€™s account of Chinese factory conditions in ‘€œThe Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs’€ made people think differently about their iPhones and iPads. But after an adaptation aired on This American Life, reaching China, an investigation there of his allegations found they were fabricated. Given other news reports on the conditions, will that matter?

    http://www.marketplace.org/topics/life/ieconomy/acclaimed-apple-critic-made-details

    download

    Tagged with technology

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  9. Triangulation 23: Don Tapscott

    Most known for his books about the implementation of technology, he has written many books including, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, Don Tapscott, is this week’s guest.

    http://twit.tv/show/triangulation/23

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  10. James Gleick On The History Of Information : NPR

    In his book The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood, James Gleick writes of information sharing through the ages, from African talking drum languages to telegraphs, telephones and the internet. Google search guru Scott Huffman also joins to talk about how Google refines the search for information on the internet.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/06/17/137250835/james-gleick-on-the-history-of-information

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

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