jessewillis / tags / science fiction

Tagged with “science fiction” (35)

  1. Why sci-fi and fantasy matter | Minnesota Public Radio News

    Sci-fi and fantasy stories "can short-circuit our assumptions about the world around us," says author Ann Leckie.

    http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/12/12/truths-revealed-in-sci-fi-and-fantasy

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  2. Kim Stanley Robinson and Sheldon Solomon on exploration and death – books podcast | Books | The Guardian

    Can humanity escape extinction by reaching for the stars? We confront final questions with the science fiction novelist Kim Stanley Robinson and the psychologist Sheldon Solomon.

    We’re heading off into the unknown in this week’s podcast, with a pair of writers who explore what drives our human experiment.

    The writer Kim Stanley Robinson has been examining possible futures for humanity for 40 years in a series of novels that stretch from nuclear devastation through climate chaos to Mars and beyond. His latest novel, Aurora, pushes 500 years onwards with a story of a vast starship on a 200-year journey to Tau Ceti.

    Robinson explains why he decided to write a generation starship novel and why he’s happier pushing at the boundaries of fiction rather than the boundaries of science.

    The psychologist Sheldon Solomon has, by contrast, been expanding the realm of science, putting an insight from ancient philosophy – that our lives are shaped by our awareness of our own mortality – on a sound experimental footing.

    Solomon explains how he and his colleagues Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski have been measuring the ways in which the fear of death alters our behaviour and how the stories we tell ourselves against that fear have forged history.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2015/aug/07/kim-stanley-robinson-sheldon-solomon-exploration-death-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  3. The Right Book by Cory Doctorow read by Neil Gaiman

    From the short story collection With A Little Help.

    From http://craphound.com/walh/audiobook/download-audiobook

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  4. Flying Cars and Tricorders: How Sci-Fi Invented the Present

    From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to George Orwell’s 1984 to Spike Jonze’s Oscar-winning Her, artists have imagined what the future will look like. In this week’s episode, Kurt Andersen explores how science fiction has shaped the world we’re living in right now. The inventor of the cell phone gives credit to Star Trek’s communicator; International Space Station superstar Chris Hadfield explains the ups and downs of space; and science writer Carl Zimmer says the giant sandworms of Dune got him interested in life on Earth. And we answer the age old question: where’s my flying car?

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  5. Reading Envy: Reading Envy Podcast 002: Return of the Euthanized Book

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  6. Podcast: Ian Tregillis explains the Milkweed novels - Boing Boing

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  7. Hypnogoria: HYPNOBOBS 73 - Eggs & Orchids: Two Tales from Mr HG Wells

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  8. Storyboard: Paolo Bacigalupi on Writing Political Sci-Fi for Young Adults

    In his debut novel The Windup Girl, science fiction writer Paolo Bacigalupi explored a world ravaged by climate change and energy scarcity — and won both the Hugo and the Nebula awards while he was at it.

    Though his dystopian future might not seem like the best place for kids, he followed up with two books for young adults: Ship Breaker and The Drowned Cities. Set in the same universe as The Windup Girl, they are gripping adventure tales about kids doing what it takes to survive in a world where the odds are always stacked against them.

    In this episode of the Storyboard podcast, Bacigalupi talks to Wired senior editor Adam Rogers about the appeal of YA fiction, life in the “Accelerated Age” and writing political novels that don’t feel like polemics. There is a brief moment of mature language.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/07/storyboard-paolo-bacigalupi/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  9. Storyboard: How Charles Yu Uses Sci-Fi to Explore the Human Condition

    If anyone tries to tell you that science fiction isn’t literary, please point them to the work of Charles Yu. His debut novel, How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, used the conventions of sci-fi to tell the deeply emotional story of a time-travel technician searching for his missing father.

    His latest genre-bending effort is Sorry Please Thank You, a short-story collection in which people outsource their bad days and zombies go on dates.

    In this episode of the Storyboard podcast, Yu talks to Wired senior editor Adam Rogers about making metaphors literal, how sci-fi tropes let him explore the inner lives of his characters, and his particular brand of futuristic ennui.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/07/storyboard-charles-yu/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  10. Annalee Newitz - Your Business Plan Is Science Fiction —€“ And That’s a Good Thing

    Just two decades ago, the Web and public internet were the stuff of science fiction. Creators like William Gibson, who coined the term "cyberspace" in his novel Neuromancer, helped define the terms of social life online, as well as inspiring many of the inventions (like smartphones) that we take for granted. But what is today’s science fiction telling us about where our technology will go tomorrow? I’ll talk about the stories today’s scifi creators are telling about the Web and internet, and how their ideas create a fantastical map of what people are seeking in their online lives. Fiction – And That’s a Good Thing

    http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/annalee-newitz/your-business-plan-science-fiction-and-s-good-thin/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

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