Tagged with “he” (167)

  1. BBC World Service - The Documentary, The Easter Rising 1916

    How six days of armed struggle in 1916 changed Irish and British history

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03p502j

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  2. The Severed Hand by Wilhelm Hauff

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  3. 19Nocturne Blvd: The Dunwich Horror Part 1

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  4. 19Nocturne Blvd: The Dunwich Horror Part 2

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  5. 19Nocturne Blvd: The Dunwich Horror Part 3

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  6. 19Nocturne Blvd: The Dunwich Horror Part 4

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  7. ‘The 100’ And Other Shows That Are Worth A Second Glance : NPR

    NPR’s Linda Wertheimer talks to Variety TV critic Maureen Ryan about one of her favorite under the radar TV shows of the past year, the CW’s "The 100."

    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/13/459554593/-the-100-and-other-shows-that-are-worth-a-second-glance

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  8. Cory Doctorow on Poverty, Privacy, and Our Relationship With Technology ‹ Literary Hub

    In this episode of A Phone Call From Paul, Paul Holdengraber welcomes Cory Doctorow to America, discusses how privacy is a vanishing idea, and what is going to happen to our brains in the future…

    Cory Doctorow on welfare and poverty…

    The kind of social welfare infrastructure we have now compared to the postwar infrastructure is so anemic. And the view of people who participate in social welfare is so vituperative. The hate reserved for the poor, especially in the United Kingdom, is so venomous, that it’s really kind of hard to understand except as the kind of hatred that people have for things that they fear more than things that they despise. I think there’s this view, maybe, that all of us, rather than being millionaires in waiting, are refugees in waiting, and when we see people who are becoming internal economic refugees, or who are traditional refugees coming from places like Syria, I think we see an uncomfortable future for ourselves.

    Cory Doctorow on standardized testing…

    I think that standardized testing—as someone who was raised by teachers—standardizing testing, to me, is grotesque. It treats education as a kind of business whose product is standardized productive humans as opposed to something that does this varied and Socratic business of learning. And I think that standardized testing is part and parcel of the idea that teachers cant’ be trusted, and that teachers, as people who are on the public payroll, are doing something that is innately suspicious and have to be monitored and made accountable, as though finding out whether or not the quantifiable parts of education are performing well tells you anything about how the qualitative parts of education are performing.

    Cory Doctorow on the collective action problem…

    The collective action problem—the deadlock… It’s the Bernie Sanders problem, it’s the Lawrence Lessig problem. This is the problem that you and everybody else need to coordinate your action in order to solve something that all of you are suffering under, and you all agree, but you can’t figure out how to coordinate. That is, I think, the wicked problem of our age. And it’s one that technology has some really interesting things to say about.

     

     

    A Phone Call From PaulCory DoctorowPaul HoldengraberpodcastsprivacytechnologyThe Internet

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    http://lithub.com/cory-doctorow-on-poverty-privacy-and-our-relationship-with-technology/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  9. Kim Stanley Robinson and Sheldon Solomon on exploration and death – books podcast | Books | The Guardian

    Can humanity escape extinction by reaching for the stars? We confront final questions with the science fiction novelist Kim Stanley Robinson and the psychologist Sheldon Solomon.

    We’re heading off into the unknown in this week’s podcast, with a pair of writers who explore what drives our human experiment.

    The writer Kim Stanley Robinson has been examining possible futures for humanity for 40 years in a series of novels that stretch from nuclear devastation through climate chaos to Mars and beyond. His latest novel, Aurora, pushes 500 years onwards with a story of a vast starship on a 200-year journey to Tau Ceti.

    Robinson explains why he decided to write a generation starship novel and why he’s happier pushing at the boundaries of fiction rather than the boundaries of science.

    The psychologist Sheldon Solomon has, by contrast, been expanding the realm of science, putting an insight from ancient philosophy – that our lives are shaped by our awareness of our own mortality – on a sound experimental footing.

    Solomon explains how he and his colleagues Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski have been measuring the ways in which the fear of death alters our behaviour and how the stories we tell ourselves against that fear have forged history.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2015/aug/07/kim-stanley-robinson-sheldon-solomon-exploration-death-podcast

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  10. The Right Book by Cory Doctorow read by Neil Gaiman

    From the short story collection With A Little Help.

    From http://craphound.com/walh/audiobook/download-audiobook

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

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