jessewillis / tags / book:title

Tagged with “book:title” (12)

  1. The Right Book by Cory Doctorow read by Neil Gaiman

    From the short story collection With A Little Help.

    From http://craphound.com/walh/audiobook/download-audiobook

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  2. A History of the World in Maps - Late Night Live - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Throughout history, maps have always been as much about their creators and their worldviews as about reproducing an accurate replica of the world. Early maps were also about the unknown and how to display the borders of the known world. Monsters in illustration were often used to represent what lay beyond the edge of the world, and cartographers competed to create the best and scariest monsters on their creations.

    Professor and BBC documentary presenter Jeremy Brotton has produced a study of the cultural values embodied in maps and collected them in a book called A History of the World in Twelve Maps.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/a-history-of-the-world-in-maps/4491276

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  3. James Gleick On The History Of Information : NPR

    In his book The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood, James Gleick writes of information sharing through the ages, from African talking drum languages to telegraphs, telephones and the internet. Google search guru Scott Huffman also joins to talk about how Google refines the search for information on the internet.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/06/17/137250835/james-gleick-on-the-history-of-information

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  4. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    Today my guest on Singularity 1 on 1 is award winning science fiction author Charles Stross. It was his seminal singularity book Accelerando that not only won the 2006 Locus Award (in addition to being a finalist for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and on the final ballot for the Hugo Award) but was also at least in part responsible for my launching of SingularitySymposium.com and SingularityWeblog.com.

    During my conversation with Charlie we discuss issues such as: his early interest in and love for science fiction; his work as a “code monkey” for a start up company during the first dot com boom of the late nineties and the resulting short sci fi story Lobsters (which eventually turned into Accelerando); his upcoming book Rule 34; his take on the human condition, brain uploading, the technological singularity and our chances of surviving it.

    Charles Stross, 46, is a full-time science fiction writer and resident of Edinburgh, Scotland. The winner of two Locus Reader Awards and winner of the 2005 and 2010 Hugo awards for best novella, Stross’ works have been translated into over twelve languages.

    Like many writers, Stross has had a variety of careers, occupations, and job-shaped-catastrophes in the past, from pharmacist (he quit after the second police stake-out) to first code monkey on the team of a successful dot-com startup (with brilliant timing he tried to change employer just as the bubble burst).

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  5. Arthur C. Clarke, Alvin Toffler, Margaret Mead

    What does the future look like from the past? This exciting program with three people that could not better represent the intelligentsia of futurism circa 1970. This recording is from a radio program called “Sound on Film”, a series on films and the people who make them. This episode is entitled “2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?” Recorded May 7th, 1970. Joseph Gelman is the moderator.

    At the time of this recording Arthur C. Clarke had recently collaborated on the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick. Alvin Toffler’s mega-influential book, Future Shock, is about to be published. And Margaret Mead is the world’s foremost cultural anthropologist.

    An intriguing conversation that still has relevance today.

    2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?

    Length–54:18

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  6. Thrillers For A Winter’s Night : NPR

    It’s a good time to be holed up with the supercharged pages of some new thrillers. Here are four: Noir by Olivier Pauvert, Eclipse by Richard North Patterson, Daemon by Daniel Suarez, and Terminal Freeze by Lincoln Child.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=98964876

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  7. Sci-Fi Inspires Engineers To Build Our Future : NPR

    Search engines, virtual worlds, the Internet — ever get the feeling you’re living in a science fiction fantasy? Well indeed you are. For more than a century, inventors have been driven to create what sci-fi writers have boldly imagined before.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129333703&ft=1

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  8. We’ll Always Have Zeppelins — The Incomparable

    Climb in your Zeppelin, grab a self-burning book, and prepare for the first Incomparable Podcast, in which we discuss "The City and The City," "The Windup Girl," "For The Win," and more. Plus we mispronounce the names of writers.

    The Incomparable Participants: Glenn Fleishman, Scott McNulty, Dan Moren, and Jason Snell. The Incomparable Theme Song composed by Christopher Breen.

    Prominently mentioned in this Incomparable episode:

    • "The City & The City" by China Miéville
    • "The Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "For the Win" by Cory Doctorow

    Also mentioned:

    • "Perdido Street Station" by China Miéville
    • "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Boneshaker" by Cherie Priest
    • "The Gone-Away World" by Nick Harkaway
    • "Ship Breaker" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "Tongues of Serpents" by Naomi Novik
    • "The Dream of Perpetual Motion" by Dexter Palmer
    • "A Storm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin
    • "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood
    • "The Yiddish Policeman’s Union" by Michael Chabon
    • "Bitter Seeds" by Ian Tregillis
    • "The Adamantine Palace" by Stephen Deas
    • "Shades of Grey" by Jasper Fforde
    • "Fables" by Bill Willingham and Lan Medina

    http://www.theincomparable.com/2010/08/1-well-always-have-zeppelins-1.html

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  9. Don Watson on the Absurdity of Corporate Speak

    Powerpoint presentations, key performance indicators and mission statements. Do they make our businesses and institutions run more efficiently, or are they irritating and faddish, not just devoid of meaning, but actually obstructive of clear communication? In his new book, "Bendable Learnings", there is no doubt what Don Watson thinks. In this laugh-out-loud talk at the ANU, he outlines his argument for why we need to avoid the ridiculous confusion of corporate language.

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  10. Dreams of Electric Sheep

    June 29, 2007

    25 years ago this week, Blade Runner debuted in American theaters. It was set in a Los Angeles of the future, but its portrayals of race and racism had plenty of resonance in 1982. Reporter Phillip Martin looks back on a classic of cyborgian social criticism.

    http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2007/06/29/08

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

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