jessewillis / collective / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (450)

  1. Human Insecurity

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834. What does the incident teach us about modern-day network security?

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information—effectively conducting the world’s first cyberattack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, security expert.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/10/what_an_1834_hack_of_the_french_telegraph_system_can_teach_us_about_modern.html

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  2. The Box That AI Lives In

    How could an 18th-century robot win at chess? By using a trick that big tech firms still pull on us today.

    In the new podcast The Secret History of the Future, from Slate and the Economist: Examine the history of tech to uncover stories that help us illuminate the present and predict the future. From the world’s first cyberattack in 1834 to 19th-century virtual reality, the Economist’s Tom Standage and Slate’s Seth Stevenson find the ancient ingenuity that our modern digital technology can learn from and expose age-old weaknesses we are already on a course to repeat.

    In the first episode: An 18th-century device called the Mechanical Turk convinced Europeans that a robot could play winning chess. But there was a trick. It’s a trick that companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook still pull on us today. Guests include futurist Jaron Lanier and Luis von Ahn, founder of CAPTCHA and Duolingo.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/09/a_200_year_old_chess_playing_robot_explains_the_internet.html

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  3. Designing for Everyone, Everywhere with Luke Wrobkewski | Overtime

    Our latest Overtime guest, Luke Wroblewski, is known best for humanizing technology. He’s the author of several web design books, has founded several start-ups that were later acquired, and he’s now the Product Director at Google.

    In this episode, Dan and Luke discuss the key ideas behind his book Mobile First and how that translates to building for devices today, why we should be data-informed not data-driven when it comes to building products, and what he learned from his time creating and building Bagcheck and Polar.

    https://overtime.simplecast.fm/luke-wroblewski

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  4. In 1968, computers got personal: How the ‘mother of all demos’ changed the world

    A 90-minute presentation in 1968 showed off the earliest desktop computer system. In the process it introduced the idea that technology could make individuals better – if government funded research.

    https://theconversation.com/in-1968-computers-got-personal-how-the-mother-of-all-demos-changed-the-world-101654

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  5. Presentable #51: An Oral History of Web Standards With Jeffrey Zeldman - Relay FM

    Designer, author, speaker, publisher, podcaster and longtime friend Jeffrey Zeldman joins the show to reminisce on the origin of the Web Standards Project and it’s legacy 20 years on.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/51

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  6. The Decentralized Web

    S01E07: The Decentralized Web

    Darius talks a lot about the decentralized web and in particular ActivityPub, a newish web specification that is trying its best to make it possible for social network sites to talk to each other in a standardized way. You might be familiar with Mastodon as a kind of Twitter replacement, and we talk about that but also PeerTube and a few other things. Emma has many questions about this uncharted territory of the web, and Darius answers them by saying "well, in theory" a lot. Like a lot a lot. Things mentioned: the Friend Camp code of conduct and that time Facebook bought Instagram and then disabled Instagram’s Twitter compatibility.

    https://toomuchnotenough.site/episodes/s01e07.html

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  7. Do We Need a New Internet?

    Britt and Ellie explore what the internet of the future could (or should) look like.

    All around the world, governments are increasingly looking at control of the internet; whether it’s to regulate content, hide or ban content or increase ownership of your data.

    Is this the opposite of what the internet was originally designed to be - a free, open and uncensored space?

    In this seventh episode, Britt Wray and Ellie Cosgrave meet the people who want to bring that dream back using their alternative internet networks. Together, they imagine what the internet could or should look like in the future.

    Cory Doctorow joins Britt and Ellie to navigate this huge subject as we meet former Wikileaks journalist James Ball, blockchain experts Stephen Tual and Juan Benet, Jilian York from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, security researcher Leonie Tanczer, Chaos Computer Club spokesman Linus Neumann, TOR developer Isis Agora Lovecruft and Mr C, co-founder of Hack Lab.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05y10x8

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  8. How I built this with Stewart Butterfield

    In the early 2000s, Stewart Butterfield tried to build a weird, massively multiplayer online game, but the venture failed.

    Instead, he and his co-founders used the technology they had developed to create the photo-sharing site Flickr.

    After Flickr was acquired by Yahoo in 2005, Butterfield went back to the online game idea, only to fail again.

    But the office messaging platform Slack rose from the ashes of that second failure — a company which, today, is valued at over $5 billion.

    https://www.npr.org/2018/07/27/633164558/slack-flickr-stewart-butterfield

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  9. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

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  10. Assistive technology: Where are we going?

    Peter heads to a Microsoft research centre to look at the latest in assistive technology.

    The lives of blind and visually-impaired people are being transformed by technology. But where are the changes heading? Peter White is joined by YouTuber Lucy Edwards as they head to a Microsoft research centre, to get her take on life as a digital native. As a blind person, what does she want from the technology that’s around the corner?

    Microsoft’s "Senior Technology Evangelist" Hector Minto explains his job title - and takes Peter and Lucy through some of the tools of their "Seeing AI" app. He addresses their questions about the current state of technology which is for, and increasingly designed by, the blind and visually impaired.

    We also hear from Saqib Shaikh, who was a driving force behind Microsoft’s approach to technology for the blind and VI and from Dave Williams, who trains people to use assistive technology.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b85m67

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