Tagged with “nasa” (28)

  1. Feet on the Ground, Eyes on the Stars: The True Story of a Real Rocket Man with G.A. “Jim” Ogle – User Defenders podcast : Inspiring Interviews with UX Superheroes.

    G.A. “Jim” Ogle fell in love with airplanes at the early age of 8 years old. The circumstances that presented this initial passion were far from ideal.

    He was recovering in a hospital bed following a 7-hour surgery to essentially re-attach his badly mangled right leg from a horrible school bus wreck. He awoke from the operation to see a model airplane hanging down from a wooden structure over his bed that was to be used as a traction device to slowly pull his left leg back into place. It was broken at the hip and rammed almost three inches into his lower torso.

    His injuries would prevent him from being a pilot in the Air Force. But this reality would not deter him from being in the air with airplanes because 12 years later he became involved in space with missiles and rockets on his first job at Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1958. This was the beginning of his 51-year career of being associated with every manned moon mission and all 135 Space Shuttle missions. He finally got his layoff notice along with 8,000 other space workers following the final Shuttle mission, STS-135, in July 2011.

    He likes to tell folks questioning his unusual longevity in this field that he was fortunate to be “in the right place at the right time and the right age.” He considers himself blessed for having had the opportunity to be a part of this truly exciting time in America’s beginnings in space.

    Fun fact: Jim requires 10 lemons and multiple servings of tartar sauce with every seafood meal. The last lemon squeeze after the meal is used to clean his hands!

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/feet-on-the-ground-eyes-on-the-stars-the-true-story-of-a-real-rocket-man-with-g-a-jim-ogle/

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  2. Tabetha Boyajian: The most mysterious star in the universe | TED Talk

    Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tabetha_boyajian_the_most_mysterious_star_in_the_universe

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  3. BFM: The Business Radio Station - Eureka: Humanity in Space

    This month, on Eureka, Uma visits Singapore’s ArtScience Museum to check out their latest exhibition - NASA: A Human Adventure - with curator Jukka Nurminen. After that, he speaks to Dr. Michio Kaku, theoretical physicist, futurist, and popularizer of science, to get his thoughts on where were are, about our plans for the future, and about how we need to be excited again at the prospect of venturing beyond our shores.

    http://www.bfm.my/eureka-humanity-in-space.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. CBC Ideas: Generation Mars, Part 1

    The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We’ll be driven by a desire to find life — or what remains of it — and to colonize the planet. Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving — and living — on the Red Planet.

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/generation-mars-part-1-1.3812284

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  5. How to Make a Golden Record - Science Friday

    Less than a year before NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft were scheduled for takeoff, astronomer Carl Sagan and SETI researcher Frank Drake received an intriguing proposal from the space agency: Would they be interested in crafting a message to alien civilizations to accompany Voyager on its interstellar journey? Over the next nine months, Sagan, Drake, and a small team of scientists and artists scrambled to compile a unique document—part time capsule, part interstellar greeting—to send to the stars. The Golden Record was born.

    Over the next three weeks, Science Friday is celebrating the legacy of the Golden Record, in anticipation of Voyager’s 40th anniversary next year. And we’re asking you: What would you include on a Golden Record?

    This week, we explore the Golden Record’s history with two of its creators. Ann Druyan was the creative director for the record project (she would go on to co-write COSMOS: A Personal Voyage with her husband Carl Sagan). And Drake, author of the Drake equation, helmed the record’s picture sequence. Together, they join Ira to remember those frenzied months when they compiled the Golden Record—a “best of” collection of science, art, and ingenuity.

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/how-to-make-a-golden-record/

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  6. BBC World Service - Discovery, “Faster, Better, Cheaper”

    Kevin Fong explores the success and failure of NASA’s missions to Mars

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p041b4k4

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  7. Extreme Science: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope - SXSW Interactive 2016

    NASA has always pushed boundaries in big science and big technology. Right now, NASA (partnering with the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency) is building, assembling, and testing the largest telescope to ever be launched into space: the James Webb Space Telescope. As the scientific successor to the beloved Hubble Space Telescope, JWST will explore uncharted territories in the first epoch of galaxy formation—a part of our Universe never seen before. JWST will also have the amazing capability to study exoplanet atmospheres in unprecedented detail. This is possible due to innovative technologies that push the boundaries of what is capable for spacecraft.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/extreme-science-nasas-james-webb-space-telescope-sxsw-interactive-2016
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  8. Next for NASA: The Journey to Mars - SXSW Interactive 2016

    NASA’s Journey to Mars is underway. Already, the first steps are being taken – rovers and orbiters are studying the habitability of the Red Planet, astronauts aboard the International Space Station are studying the effects of long-duration stays in space, and the new Orion crew vehicle successfully has completed a test flight 15 times higher than the space station’s orbit. Now, Kennedy Space Center in Florida is transforming into a next-generation spaceport, the world’s most powerful rocket – Space Launch System – is undergoing manufacture and testing, and other advanced new systems are in development. Beginning very soon, increasingly ambitious missions will lead to the first steps on Mars.

    https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/next-for-nasa-the-journey-to-mars-sxsw-interactive-2016

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 30 Years After Explosion, Challenger Engineer Still Blames Himself : The Two-Way : NPR

    Bob Ebeling, an anonymous source for NPR’s 1986 report on the disaster, tells NPR that despite warning NASA of troubles before the launch, he believes God "shouldn’t have picked me for that job."

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/28/464744781/30-years-after-disaster-challenger-engineer-still-blames-himself

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The Apollo 13 Space Emergency

    One of the Apollo 13 astronauts describes the moment disaster struck in 1970.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03cpt78

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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