Tagged with “apollo” (9)

  1. Feet on the Ground, Eyes on the Stars: The True Story of a Real Rocket Man with G.A. “Jim” Ogle – User Defenders podcast : Inspiring Interviews with UX Superheroes.

    G.A. “Jim” Ogle fell in love with airplanes at the early age of 8 years old. The circumstances that presented this initial passion were far from ideal.

    He was recovering in a hospital bed following a 7-hour surgery to essentially re-attach his badly mangled right leg from a horrible school bus wreck. He awoke from the operation to see a model airplane hanging down from a wooden structure over his bed that was to be used as a traction device to slowly pull his left leg back into place. It was broken at the hip and rammed almost three inches into his lower torso.

    His injuries would prevent him from being a pilot in the Air Force. But this reality would not deter him from being in the air with airplanes because 12 years later he became involved in space with missiles and rockets on his first job at Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1958. This was the beginning of his 51-year career of being associated with every manned moon mission and all 135 Space Shuttle missions. He finally got his layoff notice along with 8,000 other space workers following the final Shuttle mission, STS-135, in July 2011.

    He likes to tell folks questioning his unusual longevity in this field that he was fortunate to be “in the right place at the right time and the right age.” He considers himself blessed for having had the opportunity to be a part of this truly exciting time in America’s beginnings in space.

    Fun fact: Jim requires 10 lemons and multiple servings of tartar sauce with every seafood meal. The last lemon squeeze after the meal is used to clean his hands!

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/feet-on-the-ground-eyes-on-the-stars-the-true-story-of-a-real-rocket-man-with-g-a-jim-ogle/

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  2. BFM: The Business Radio Station - Eureka: Humanity in Space

    This month, on Eureka, Uma visits Singapore’s ArtScience Museum to check out their latest exhibition - NASA: A Human Adventure - with curator Jukka Nurminen. After that, he speaks to Dr. Michio Kaku, theoretical physicist, futurist, and popularizer of science, to get his thoughts on where were are, about our plans for the future, and about how we need to be excited again at the prospect of venturing beyond our shores.

    http://www.bfm.my/eureka-humanity-in-space.html

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  3. The Apollo 13 Space Emergency

    One of the Apollo 13 astronauts describes the moment disaster struck in 1970.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03cpt78

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  4. Out of this World: Britain’s history in space - The Naked Scientists

    We look at the latest news from the stars, planets and other heavenly bodies. Plus interviews with professional astronomers and the answers to your space science questions.

    Space Boffins Richard Hollingham and Sue Nelson are inside London’s Science Museum with the museum’s curator of space, Doug Millard, and the original Apollo 10 capsule. Apart from a tribute to Apollo 11’s crucial predecessor, they discuss Britain’s history in space and hear from Skylon pioneer Alan Bond on the progress of his revolutionary spaceplane. There’s also an update on Europe’s ExoMars mission rover from the new Mars Yard at Airbus Defence and Space to celebrate its one year anniversary.

    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/astronomy/show/20150416/

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  5. The Last Man on the Moon - The Naked Scientists

    We look at the latest news from the stars, planets and other heavenly bodies. Plus interviews with professional astronomers and the answers to your space science questions.

    In this special edition, the Last Man on the Moon, Gene Cernan, talks exclusively to Richard Hollingham about the final step, mortality and his disappointment about the way the space programme has developed.

    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/astronomy/show/20140810/

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  6. One Small Step For Man, One Giant Lunar Park For The U.S.? : NPR

    Two members of Congress want to preserve artifacts from American lunar missions with a national park on the moon, but there are some international hurdles to jump. Still, Space Policy Institute director Dr. Scott Pace says the bill raises intriguing questions about what the future of human-space interaction will look like.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/07/20/203605390/one-small-step-for-man-one-giant-lunar-park-for-the-u-s

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  7. What The Apollo Astronauts Did For Life Insurance

    This week, Americans have been remembering Neil Armstrong. But before he walked on the moon, he had to solve a much more prosaic problem.

    "You’re about to embark on a mission that’s more dangerous than anything any human has ever done before," Robert Pearlman, a space historian and collector with collectspace.com, told me. "And you have a family that you’re leaving behind on Earth, and there’s a real chance you will not be returning."

    Exactly the kind of situation a responsible person plans for by taking out a life insurance policy. Not surprisingly, a life insurance policy for somebody about to get on a rocket to the moon cost a fortune.

    But Neil Armstrong had something going for him. He was famous, as was the whole Apollo 11 crew. People really wanted their autographs.

    "These astronauts had been signing autographs since the day they were announced as astronauts, and they knew even though eBay didn’t exist back then, that there was a market for such things," Pearlman said. "There was demand."

    Especially for what were called covers -– envelopes signed by astronauts and postmarked on important dates.

    About a month before Apollo 11 was set to launch, the three astronauts entered quarantine. And, during free moments in the following weeks, each of the astronauts signed hundreds of covers.

    They gave them to a friend. And on important days — the day of the launch, the day the astronauts landed on the moon — their friend got them to the post office and got them postmarked, and then distributed them to the astronauts’ families.

    It was life insurance in the form of autographs.

    "If they did not return from the moon, their families could sell them — to not just fund their day-to-day lives, but also fund their kids’ college education and other life needs," Pearlman said.

    The life insurance autographs were not needed. Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the moon and came home safely. They signed probably tens of thousands more autographs for free.

    But then, in the 1990s, Robert Pearlman says, the insurance autographs started showing up in space memorabilia auctions. An Apollo 11 insurance autograph can cost as much as $30,000.

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  8. T 40: The Three Greatest Hacks of Apollo

    Forty years ago, manned exploration of the moon was in full swing. The three greatest hacks of the Apollo program occurred on Apollo 12, 13, and 14, in two cases saving the mission, and in one case saving lives. Drawing on personal interviews with the engineers involved and archival records, this talk will look at the technical aspects of each hack, including largely overlooked, but critical, details of how the lunar module was prepared for lifeboat mode during the Apollo 13 crisis.

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  9. The First Lunar Landing

    40 years ago today, the Apollo 11 mission successfully completed the first lunar landing. This is the audio from 102 hours and 11 minutes into the mission, just prior to touchdown.

    Charlie Duke in Houston talks to Michael Collins in the command module and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in the lunar lander.

    The full transcript is here: http://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11.landing.html

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