jeremyll / jeremy

Social Media, Communication, and Technology Enthusiast.

There are no people in jeremyll’s collective.

Huffduffed (19)

  1. The Web as a Conversation

    One of my favorite people to speak with about the state of content on the web is Ginny Redish. She’s one of those people who cuts to the point so decisively that you’re left asking yourself… “why didn’t I think of that?”

    Ginny has made her career by helping organizations engage their users with captivating content. I had a chance to speak with her regarding what she’s up to and what she plans to talk about at our upcoming User Interface Conference and I was not disappointed.

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  2. The Real Social Networks

    James’s new book, “Connected”… Unintentionally influencing your friend’s friend’s friend… How happiness is like the flu… Obesity spreads like an idea …… … but don’t try to lose weight by dumping your fat friends… An old shampoo commercial, voting, and Facebook pseudo-friends…

    http://bloggingheads.tv/diavlogs/23217

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  3. Browser Wars III: The Platform Wins

    We're doing so darn much with the Web platform these days, from cross-domain access mechanisms to new drawing and graphics tools. But in the end, we still have to deal with different web browsers. This discussion brings the leads from Mozilla (Firefox), Microsoft (IE), Google (Chrome) and Opera (Opera) together for yet another incendiary discussion about the future of the web.

    Skip to the end if you you want to hear the good stuff.

    From http://www.sxsw.com/node/1632

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  4. Design for the Wisdom of Crowds

    People are often dumb, so how can crowds be wise? James Surowiecki laid the groundwork in his book, "The Wisdom of Crowds." In this solo presentation, Derek Powazek will apply those ideas to the web, concentrating on how to design websites that empower people to work together to create something truly awesome.

    Derek Powazek Grand Poo-Bah, Powazek Productions

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  5. The War for the Web

    Tim O'Reilly Web 2.0 Conference 23 minutes, 11mb, recorded 2009-11-17

    The early days of the internet were truly astonishing. As people came to comprehend the power of networked information, they seized the many opportunities for innovation created by the open architecture of the web. Of course, the browser wars also showed that threats to openness and interoperability were a real danger. Today, Tim O'Reilly worries that escalating competition between large companies and closed platforms may drive the web towards a battle ground of locked down services and proprietary data.

    As large, powerful players have emerged on the internet landscape, you don't have to look far to see some troubling skirmishes between opposing forces. O'Reilly touches on several examples where well known web applications include features designed to limit flexibility and user choice. To some extent, limits may be necessary to protect privacy, but in some cases, there is clear intent to lock in users at the expense of the competition. The situation is even more extreme in the mobile arena.

    Will the large companies play by the cherished rules of the open web as we've known it? It may depend on how "the cloud" grows. As web service companies such as Amazon, Google, Apple and Microsoft make O'Reilly's notion of the web 2.0 "internet as a platform" a reality, they will have choices on how to maneuver. There is pressure for the giants to forge alliances, and leverage unique services as weapons to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. But, history has shown that internet success often comes if you "do what you do best, link to the rest". O'Reilly urges companies to stick to their core strengths, maintain an open architecture, and embrace the "small pieces loosely joined" philosophy.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4317.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  6. Nikola Tesla: Strange Genius

    The astounding mad scientist life of Nikola Tesla. Just who was this pioneer of radio, radar, and wireless communication? We discover his legacy in the work of today’s scientists and artists. Samantha Hunt’s novel The Invention of Everything Else is a fictional portrait of Tesla. Monologist Mike Daisey tells us how Tesla X-rayed Mark Twain’s head. And across the country, garage inventors toil in obscurity at the next breakthrough that will change the world.

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

  7. Great Work Interview - Merlin Mann

    http://www.boxofcrayons.biz/2009/11/great-work-interview-merlin-mann/

    Here’s a confession. I want to be able to think like Merlin Mann.

    He’s really smart on the topic of productivity, and in fact some part of his success comes from 43Folders.com which is a reference to David Allen’s Getting Things Done system. But his work is not just about productivity. It’s about creativity and purpose and striving to stay human and sane in a busy and distracting world and doing work that matters, doing Great Work. And he does all of this in funny, provocative, iconoclastic way.

    In fact, writing this introduction and listening to the interview again has already provoked me to shift some of my own commitments in an effort to, as he puts it, “identify and destroy small return bullshit. Shut off anything that’s noisier than it is useful.” Great stuff indeed, and this is a wise and funny interview.

    In our conversation we talk about:

    * How the present is a “remedial course for the future” – and the pros and cons of those ‘creation myth’ stories of where people find clues for their Great Work
    * The importance of an open heart and just where that might lead you
    * The connection between productivity and creativity
    * The two levels of prioritization (and how freeing it is to know that)
    * And quite a bit more
    

    You can follow Merlin on Twitter at http://twitter.com/hotdogsladies

    The interviews are all between 25 and 30 minutes long. You can either download them here as mp3s, or go to iTunes, type in “Great Work Interviews” and you’ll see them all there.

    —Huffduffed by jeremyll

Page 1 of 2Older