Tagged with “inspiration” (19)

  1. Chatting with Kent Web Host

    We got an email through to Clearleft from someone pointing out a certain similarity between our website:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/8719586981/

    …and the website for a company called Kent Web Host:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/8720710854/

    Hmmm …perhaps Clearleft were unconsciously influenced by Kent Web Host!

    Just to set the record straight, I gave them a call.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 5by5 | The Cocktail Napkin #65: My Canadian Boyfriend

    5by5 - The Cocktail Napkin #65: My Canadian Boyfriend

    That’s right. April 26. Last episode.

    I’ll mention more about it in coming episodes, but I think this will be a good thing for all of us. It’ll give me some time to think about what I’ve been trying to turn this show into and then develop a new show based off whatever that something is.

    I’m excited, and I hope you’ll be excited too.

    http://5by5.tv/tcn/65

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  3. 5by5 | The Cocktail Napkin #64: Geeking in the Rain

    5by5 - The Cocktail Napkin #64: Geeking in the Rain

    http://5by5.tv/tcn/64

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  4. 5by5 | The Cocktail Napkin #61: A Bridge Will Never Build Itself

    Two Kansas City boys who were launched onto the Internet by the Daring Fireball Linked List (Jeremy and Shawn Blanc) sat down for mediocre coffee to discuss happy accidents, taking big leaps and how simplification adds power to technology.

    http://5by5.tv/tcn/61

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  5. 5by5 | The Cocktail Napkin #49: A Love Affair With Failure

    5by5 - The Cocktail Napkin #49: A Love Affair With Failure

    http://5by5.tv/tcn/49

    —Huffduffed by merlinmann

  6. 5by5 | The Cocktail Napkin #21: Creative Modality

    [From July, 2010]

    "Merlin Mann and I cover a lot of territory, from creative failure to creative modality and how being in the wrong mode at the wrong time might bring on that failure."

    —Huffduffed by merlinmann

  7. Ken Robinson: Rethinking Educational Paradigms

    Celebrated education expert Ken Robinson argues that most "modern" approaches to learning are actually relics of an outdated, industrial-age system. This program was recorded in collaboration with the 2010 Aspen Ideas Festival, on July 8, 2010.

    Sir Ken Robinson is an expert in creativity, innovation, and human resources. He works with governments in Europe, Asia, and the United States, and with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, and cultural organizations. Robinson led a national commission on creativity, education, and the economy for the UK government and was central in forming a creative- and economic-development strategy as part of the Northern Ireland peace process. Formerly, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick.

    He has received several honorary degrees, the Athena Award from the Rhode Island School of Design, the Peabody Medal, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal from the Royal Society of Arts. He received a knighthood for his services to the arts. His latest book is The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Viking, 2009).

    —Huffduffed by mb

  8. The Cocktail Napkin #39: Dear Abby for the Social Age? - 5by5

    Jeremy talks with video producer Michelle Vargas about giving good advice to 15 year-olds, putting good stuff into the world to get good stuff back, mentorship and setting up a video playhouse for the purpose of acting in the moment.

    —Huffduffed by merlinmann

  9. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by boagworld

  10. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by boagworld

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