jaywest / tags / project

Tagged with “project” (11)

  1. How To Run A SPOT Project Kickoff Meeting | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes how to run the first meeting you have with your team about a new project your team will be doing.

    A manager we know got assigned a project for he and his team a couple of years ago, and he asked us to critique his email that he was sending out to announce the project, both big picture and early assignments. We knew this manager, and knew his team were collocated with him. Why, we thought, would a manager send out a LOOOOOOONG email to his team with LOTS of details about a not unimportant project?

    He told us, well, that's just the way I've always done it.

    Well, there's a better way. It's MUCH more effective to have a brief meeting. It's called a SPOT meeting, and even though it's yet another meeting, it's totally worth it. Here's how to run one.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/03/how-run-a-spot-project-kickoff-meeting#

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  2. The Project Management Drumbeat Meeting - Part 2 | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes how to manage work and decisions being done on a project.

    Projects are generally governed by Horstman's Law of Project Management: Who does What by When. Sometimes it's a five year project, and sometimes it's 3 weeks. But it boils down to a string of tasks and deadlines, done by humans. And often we humans end up straggling after ripe blackberries when we should be meeting deadlines.

    One thing all of us Project Managers can do to keep things on track is to run our project meetings as a Drumbeat Meeting.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/11/project-management-drumbeat-meeting-part-2

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  3. The Project Management Drumbeat Meeting - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes how to manage work and decisions being done on a project.

    Projects are generally governed by Horstman's Law of Project Management: Who does What by When. Sometimes it's a five year project, and sometimes it's 3 weeks. But it boils down to a string of tasks and deadlines, done by humans. And often we humans end up straggling after ripe blackberries when we should be meeting deadlines.

    One thing all of us Project Managers can do to keep things on track is to run our project meetings as a Drumbeat Meeting.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/11/project-management-drumbeat-meeting-part-1

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  4. Project Status is Never “Fine” | Manager Tools

    Never ask how a project is going. You'll get information that isn't helpful…and it's your fault. Ask for status, and define what status is.

    The average reported status of all projects all the world over is always "fine". That's not to say the projects are actually fine - they're all mostly crap. But we managers have a bad habit of asking the wrong questions of project team members of directs. And directs are smart enough to obfuscate.

    Let's get better at asking.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2014/02/project-status-never-fine

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  5. Project Status Reporting Simple Feedback - Part 2 | Manager Tools

    This cast concludes our guidance on how to give feedback on how you want projects reported on.

    Projects are generally governed by Horstman's Law of Project Management: Who does What by When. Sometimes it's a five year project, and sometimes it's 3 weeks. But it boils down to a string of tasks and deadlines, done by humans. And often we humans end up straggling after ripe blackberries when we should be meeting deadlines.

    One thing all of us Project Managers can do is to ask for what we want, and then give feedback when we get it, and when we don't. Easy!

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/11/project-status-reporting-simple-feedback-part-2

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  6. Project Status Reporting Simple Feedback - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes how to give feedback on how you want projects reported on.

    Projects are generally governed by Horstman's Law of Project Management: Who does What by When. Sometimes it's a five year project, and sometimes it's 3 weeks. But it boils down to a string of tasks and deadlines, done by humans. And often we humans end up straggling after ripe blackberries when we should be meeting deadlines.

    One thing all of us Project Managers can do is to ask for what we want, and then give feedback when we get it, and when we don't. Easy!

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2011/11/project-status-reporting-simple-feedback-part-1

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  7. How To Use A RACI Matrix | Manager Tools

    This guidance describes how to use a RACI [Responsible, Accountable, Consult, Inform] Matrix when determining project responsibilities.

    When you're starting a project, there are all kinds of people with fingers in the pie. There are people who want to be on the team. There are people who are affected by the work. There are people who aren't affected by the project but whose budget IS. There are people who don't want the project to succeed, but will only privately work against it. There are people who need to know stuff…but other people who WANT to know stuff.

    How do we help project managers - or how do WE as project managers - keep track of who's responsible for what? We use a responsibility matrix. The best one is called the RACI - pronounced Ray-See.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/node/140021

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

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