jasonkarns / tags / twitter:user=adactio

Tagged with “twitter:user=adactio” (4)

  1. The Joy of API

    Over the course of dConstruct, you’re going to hear plenty about APIs from the people providing them: Yahoo!, Amazon, etc. But why should you, as a developer, be interested?

    Come on a journey with Jeremy Keith as he describes how much fun can be had from hacking around with open data. Listen to his experiences of experimenting with mashups. Find out how Web Services can rekindle the passion in your code.

    After some initial foreplay describing the differences between REST and SOAP, join Jeremy as he penetrates some code. Soon you’ll be swinging with Amazon, Flickr, and Google Maps.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by jasonkarns

  2. The System Of The World

    We may regard the present state of the universe as the effect of the past and the cause of the future. An intellect which at any given moment knew all of the forces that animate nature and the mutual positions of the beings that compose it, if this intellect were vast enough to submit the data to analysis, could condense into a single formula the movement of the greatest bodies of the universe and that of the lightest atom; for such an intellect nothing could be uncertain and the future just like the past would be present before its eyes.

    — Pierre Simon de Laplace

    http://2008.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by jasonkarns

  3. Get Excited and Make Things with Science

    The relationship most adults have with science is one of observation: watching government agencies explore on behalf of us, but not actually exploring it ourselves. Science should be disruptively accessible – empowering people from a variety of different backgrounds to explore, participate in, and build new ways of interacting with and contributing to science. By having a fresh set of eyes from those who solve different types of problems, new concepts often emerge and go on to influence science in unexpected ways. A grassroots effort called Science Hack Day aims to bridge the gap between the science, technology and design industries. A Hack Day is a 48 hour all-night event that brings different people with good ideas together in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and building ‘cool stuff’. By collaborating on focused tasks during this short period, small groups of hackers are capable of producing remarkable results.

    Presenters:

    Ariel Waldman, Spacehack.org

    Ariel Waldman is the founder of Spacehack.org, a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, and the creator of Science Hack Day SF, an event that brings together scientists, technologists, designers and people with good ideas to see what they can create in one weekend. She is also the coordinator for Science Hack Days around the world, an interaction designer, and a research affiliate with Institute For The Future.

    Additionally, she sits on the advisory board for the SETI Institute‘s science radio show Big Picture Science, is a contributor to the book State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards, and is the founder of CupcakeCamp. In 2008, she was named one of the top 50 most influential individuals in Silicon Valley. Previously, she was a CoLab Program Coordinator at NASA, a Digital Anthropologist at VML (a WPP agency), and a sci-fi movie gadget columnist for Engadget.

    Jeremy Keith, Web Developer, Clearleft Ltd

    An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England making websites with Clearleft.

    Matt Bellis, Research Assoc, Northern Illinois University

    Matt is a particle physicist by training and is searching for signs of New Physics using data from the BaBar electron-positron collider experiment and the CoGeNT dark matter detection experiment. To these ends he is exploring new computing solutions to these challenges.

    He is interested in both data visualization and sonification. He is also involved in efforts to engage the public in science and teach them as much physics as they can handle.

    Matt received his PhD from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and later worked at Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University. He is currently teaching and doing research at Northern Illinois University.

    In the fall, Matt will begin his new job as a professor, teaching and continuing his physics research at Siena College in upstate-NY.

    —Huffduffed by jasonkarns

  4. Web Directions @media: Jeremy Keith — Hot Topics

    Continuing a popular @media tradition, the final session for day one, hosted by Jeremy Keith, will feature a handful of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. Wear your flak jacket: there will be controversy!

    Panelists:

    • John Allsopp
    • Hannah Donovan
    • Simon Willison
    • Christian Crumlish

    —Huffduffed by jasonkarns