Tagged with “trad” (30)

  1. Episode 03-Every Tuesday at Nine | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s Springtime in Boston. And this month’s episode is a fresh invitation to connect with people, and emerge from Winter!

    John Williams and Amy Shoemaker

    I chat with Tina Lech in Boston, John Williams in Chicago, Eoin O’Neill in Clare, and Brian Conway in White Plains, NY about the sessions they lead. I learn how each player runs these distinct weekly music gatherings–and what Irish music means to them, and the listeners who come each week.

    And trust me: whether you already play the accordion, or you’ve never been to an Irish session in your life, the story here goes way beyond a few tunes in a pub.

    I hope you’ll join me as I try to decode what sessions are all about. My conversations with the session leaders–and with Boston producer Brian O’Donovan, fiddle teacher Laurel Martin, and flute players Melissa Foster and Scott Boag opened my mind and my heart. There’s plenty of music heres, too.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-03-every-tuesday-at-nine/

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  2. Irish Music Stories Podcast: Episode 01-Trip to Sligo

    This inaugural episode tells the tale of Cormac Gaj and the band he formed with fellow Boston tweens. I learn about their amazing journey to the All Ireland music competition in Sligo; and I dig into what it meant to Cormac… and to all the parents, teachers, and peers who were in on the qualifying round in New Jersey, and the big Fleadh (contest) in Ireland. Whether you already play the fiddle or you don’t know anything about trad music or dance, you’ll join me, Shannon Heaton as I visit Boston and Dublin Comhaltas branches (Irish music schools); Mary MacNamara’s kitchen in Tulla, where she teaches music and organizes Irish music exchanges; and Cormac’s living room where he tells his big story. Great stories here from Chicago fiddler Liz Carroll, too. There’s plenty of music here, too. Full music listings and information at www.irishmusicstories.org  

    http://irishmusicstories.libsyn.com/podcast/episode-01-trip-to-sligo

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  3. Trip to the Cottage - May 30th, 2016

    Great music from Stockton’s Wing - Paul Roche, Kieran Hanrahan, Maurice Lennon, Tony Callanan & Tommy Hayes. Songs from Curly Sullivan & Jack O’Carroll. Music also with Raymond Rolland, Kit O’Connor, John Joe Doyle, Paddy & Kevin Taylor, Benny O’Connor, Brendan McGlinchey, Rodger Sherlock, Liam Farrell, P.J. Hynes, Brian Green, MacDara Ó Raghallaigh, David Power, Willie Kelly, Mick & Kathleen Conneely, Johnny McDonagh, Michelle O’Sullivan, Deirdre McSherry & more!

    http://www.radiokerry.ie/podcast_series/trip-to-the-cottage/

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  4. Copperplate Podcast 202

    Copperplate Podcast 202 presented by Alan O’Leary August  2016

    1. Paddy Glackin:   Top It Off.        Glackin

    2.Caladh Nua:        Humours of Ballyloughlin Set.            Happy Days

    1. Eilis Kennedy:   Nead na Lachan.                               Time to Sail             Damien Mullane:       The Orphan.                    

    2. Liz & Yvonne Kane:            3 & A Deer/Pangur Ban.   Side By Side

    3. Joe Derrane/Seamus Connolly/John McGann:                  Dash to Portobello/McFarley’s/Geeghan’s Reel. The Boston Edge

    4. Teada: Tom Connor’s HP/The Joy of My Life/Handy With The Stick   Teada

    5. Mick Sands & Clive Carroll: Lough Erne’s Shore. The Ominous & The Luminous

    6. Peter McAlinden: The Piper Through The Meadow Straying. Happy To Meet

    7. Niamh ni Charra:               The Belles of South Boston         Happy Out.

    8. Goitse:                 Ireland’s Green Shore.                     Inspired by Chance

    9. Mulcahy Family:  Galway Rambler/Morning Dew/Boston Irish Reel.

    10. We Banjo 3:        Chair Snapper’s Delight.                     String Theory

    http://alanoleary.libsyn.com/copperplate-podcast-202

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  5. The Musical Priest radio documentary

    Radio documentary by Seán Corcoran on Richard Henebry (1863-1916) of Portlaw, Co. Waterford, Ireland, pioneering folk song collector and musicologist. First broadcast by Waterford Local Radio (www.wlrfm.com) 7pm Sun 29 Dec 2013.Funded by the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland with the Television Licence Fee. Sound design by Ronan Browne.

    https://soundcloud.com/rollingwave/the-musical-priest-radio

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  6. “The Boys of the Lough” - Studio 360

    Michael Coleman’s recordings from the early 1920’s set the standard for all the traditional Irish music that would follow. Coleman emigrated from County Sligo, Ireland, to New York City in 1914 at the age of 23. In New York, recording companies were eager to sell records to immigrants nostalgic for the music of home. Coleman became one of the first Irish musicians to be immortalized on the shellac of a 78 rpm record.

    Coleman played a style of fiddle music particular to county Sligo. “The Sligo style is upbeat, it’s very rhythmic, uses a lot of ornamentation,” says Brian Conway, a musician from New York who plays Sligo-style fiddle.

    It was a tradition passed down from mentor to student, not on paper. “The music is not played as it’s written on sheet music,” says Fiona Ritchie, producer of the public radio show The Thistle and Shamrock. “When you had no way of recording it, the only way to memorialize it was to put it on sheet music, and then it loses that sense of rhythm that can only be captured by hearing it.”

    So when Coleman recorded the song “The Boys of the Lough,” he was crystallizing a tradition. “This was really a turning point for Irish music, because music could travel out from the communities where it had just been a natural, unremarkable part of life,” Ritchie says.

    Ritchie credits recordings by Coleman and other Irish emigrants with saving traditional Celtic music. “Once you partnered up these early recordings with radio, you had the music coming back to its home again and reinvigorating the music,” she says. “So many of these communities had been depleted, with young folks going away and taking their music with them.”

    Coleman was prodigiously talented, and thanks to those early recordings, his influence hasn’t waned. “Michael Coleman’s influence on traditional Irish music could be compared to Miles Davis in jazz, the Beatles in rock ‘n roll,” Conway says. “His influence is still felt today by those who may never have actually listened to Coleman play, but just through what they’ve learned from other people.”

    http://www.studio360.org/story/the-boys-of-the-lough/

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  7. A Conversation with Irish Step Dancer Kevin Doyle

    Traditional or folk artists do their art whatever it is—quilting, singing, or dancing from pure love.

    Often working full-time jobs and raising families, they still find the time to pursue their craft.

    This is the case for Irish step dancer Kevin Doyle, the one-time grocery store manager and bus driver is also one of the best traditional step dancers in the Northeast.

    This year, he’s been named a 2014 National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Here’s his remarkable story.

    http://www.prx.org/pieces/129475

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  8. A Conversation with Irish Fiddler Seamus Connolly

    Seamus Connolly is a teacher, scholar, and, as you heard, a remarkable irish fiddler. By his mid-twenties, Connolly had won the Irish National Fiddle Championship ten times, a feat that is still unequalled. Since emigrating to the United States in the 1970s, Seamus has performed at numerous festivals throughout the country, including the National Folk Festival, Smithsonian Folklife Festival, and with three of phenomenonally successful Masters of the Folk Violin tours organized by the National Council for the Traditional Arts.

    Connolly’s recordings including his two solo CDs, Notes from my Mind and Here and There, as well as The Boston Edge with 2004 NEA National Heritage Fellow Joe Derrane and John McGann. Since 2004, Connolly has been the Sullivan Artist in Residence at Boston College’s Center for Irish Programs where he had previously directed the highly acclaimed Gaelic Roots Summer School and Festival. Not surprisingly he is the recipient of many awards—and , he’s added a national heritage fellowship—which is a lifetime honor presented to master folk and traditional artists by the national endowment for the arts.

    I traveled to Maine to visit with Seamus when he was awarded the heritage fellowship. I began by asking Seamus to explain what makes Irish fiddling, Irish Fiddling?

    https://beta.prx.org/stories/122663

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  9. The Gloaming - The Music Show

    The Gloaming is Martin Hayes, fiddle, Iarla Ó Lionáird, vocal, Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, hardanger fiddle, Dennis Cahill, guitar and Thomas Bartlett, piano.

    Live performances in The Music Show studio:

    • Song 44: Trad arr. The Gloaming
    • Sailors Bonnet Trad arr. The Gloaming

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/musicshow/the-gloaming/5840218

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  10. Altan Live at the Port Fairy Folk Festival - The Live Set

    Iconic Irish folk group Altan has been bringing Donegal’s rich collection of Irish Gaelic language songs and instrumental styles to audiences around the world for more than 25 years.

    Hear highlights of their recent performance at the Port Fairy Folk Festival in this week’s show.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/liveset/altan-pfff/5467978

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