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jasonbpomerantz / Jason Pomerantz

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Huffduffed (183)

  1. 56 History of English Podcast | The Spoken History of a Global Language

    In the mid-900s, the English king battled a grand alliance of Celtic and Viking leaders at a place called Brunanburh.  The result was an Anglo-Saxon victory, and one of the more important poems composed during the Old English period. But the Anglo-Saxon victory did little to secure the region around York. The Viking influence remained strong there, and control of York passed between the English and the Vikings. One consequence of that prominent Viking presence was the continuing flow of Norse words into the northern English dialects. We continue to explore the influence of Scandinavian vocabulary on Modern English.

    Podcast: Play in new window

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    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  2. The History of English Podcast | The Spoken History of a Global Language

    In the mid-900s, the English king battled a grand alliance of Celtic and Viking leaders at a place called Brunanburh.  The result was an Anglo-Saxon victory, and one of the more important poems composed during the Old English period. But the Anglo-Saxon victory did little to secure the region around York. The Viking influence remained strong there, and control of York passed between the English and the Vikings. One consequence of that prominent Viking presence was the continuing flow of Norse words into the northern English dialects. We continue to explore the influence of Scandinavian vocabulary on Modern English.

    Podcast: Play in new window

    | Download

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  3. The History of English Podcast | The Spoken History of a Global Language

    In the mid-900s, the English king battled a grand alliance of Celtic and Viking leaders at a place called Brunanburh.  The result was an Anglo-Saxon victory, and one of the more important poems composed during the Old English period. But the Anglo-Saxon victory did little to secure the region around York. The Viking influence remained strong there, and control of York passed between the English and the Vikings. One consequence of that prominent Viking presence was the continuing flow of Norse words into the northern English dialects. We continue to explore the influence of Scandinavian vocabulary on Modern English.

    Podcast: Play in new window

    | Download

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  4. Map Out Marvel’s New York City with the Bowery Boys on This Week in Marvel Episode 164.5 | News | Marvel.com

    Podcasters Tom Meyers and Greg Young talk about the history of Marvel in NYC and share their comic book memories!

    http://marvel.com/news/comics/23870/map_out_marvels_new_york_city_with_the_bowery_boys_on_this_week_in_marvel_episode_164.5

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  5. Episode 53: The End of Endings | The History of English Podcast

    Kevin – great episode.

    I’m curious as to why word order and inflection loss didn’t happen as much in Scandinavia and other places – and why so heavily in England.

    Surely the Norman Conquest had a large part in it, but there were tons of Old Norse dialects coming into contact with one another – was it just that English (Anglo-Saxon) was just that different enough?

    Later on the Scandinavian tongues (except for Icelandic and Faroese) lost the third gender along with many inflections and word order became more important but unlike English adjectives and adverbs, etc. are declined in these languages.

    Also, I’m studying Danish and Swedish and the word for an animal is et dyr and ett djur, respectively, so the part about the deer meaning the general term for animal was really very clear for me in this episode.

    Also they

    become direct objects when you add on endings; i.e. dyret & djuret (the animal), but they never inflect for plural – they’re unique-ish in that way.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2014/11/24/episode-53-the-end-of-endings/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  6. 3.18- The Flight to Varennes

    A podcast exploring the great revolutions of history.

    http://www.revolutionspodcast.com/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  7. Why do fake numbers start with 555? - The Week

    Just ask anyone who had the misfortune of having the number 867-5309

    http://theweek.com/article/index/270258/why-do-fake-numbers-start-with-555

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  8. Episode 52: Bloody Axes and a Battle Royal | The History of English Podcast

    Candia,

    Thanks for the comments. I had the same reaction you did when I came across ‘slack/slouch’ and ‘smile/smirk.’

    They were exceptions to the general rules which I discussed in Episode 51, so I didn’t include them in that episode. The ultimate history of those words is obscure and uncertain, so I don’t have a good answer for why the Old English versions retain the ‘K’ sound at the end.

    However, I should note that ‘slack’ and ‘slouch’ are cognate, as are ‘smile’ and ‘smirk.’ So I think there was probably some linguistic confusion along the way. The Old English version of those words may have been influenced by the Norse pronunciations.

    The endings of ‘slouch’ and ‘smile’ developed at later dates after those words were borrowed from Old Norse.

    As far as ‘withdraw’ is concerned, that is a very good example of the original meaning of ‘with’ as ‘against.’

    As I noted back in Episode 51, ‘draw’ originally meant ‘to pull.’ So ‘withdraw’ was literally to ‘pull against.’

    Another example is ‘withstand’ which was literally to ‘stand against’ some force or event.

    As always, thanks for your feedback and comments. I hope you enjoy the next episode as well.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2014/11/07/episode-52-bloody-axes-and-a-battle-royal/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  9. Interview: John Cleese, Author Of ‘So, Anyway …’ : NPR

    John Cleese of Monty Python fame has written a memoir, So, Anyway … , which brings him from boyhood in a quiet British town called Weston to the footlights of London and screens all over the world.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/01/360427820/comedy-is-extraordinarily-difficult-john-cleese-on-being-funny

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  10. Episode 51: Norse Words and a New English | The History of English Podcast

    During the 10th century,  the English language spoken in northern and eastern England began to change under the influence of Old Norse.  These changes resulted in a north-south linguistic divide which still exists today.  In this episode we examine how modern linguists use sound changes to identify Norse words in Modern English.  We also examine English-Norse synonyms derived from common Germanic root words.

    Podcast: Play in new window

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    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2014/10/23/episode-51-norse-words-and-a-new-english/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

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