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jasonbpomerantz / Jason Pomerantz

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Huffduffed (211)

  1. MythTake - Episode 02 Odysseus & Circe | Podbean

    In this episode we’re joined by our feline co-host as we examine Odysseus’ relationship with Circe in Odyssey 10.467-486.

    Passage: Homer Odyssey 10.467-486

    Translation: Homer. Odyssey. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. New York: HarperCollins, 1967. Print. 

    Music Credits: "Super Hero" by King Louie’s Missing monuments from the album "Live at WFMU" (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Available online at Free Music Archive.

    Brought to you by @darrinsunstrum and @InnesAlison

    view more

    https://www.podbean.com/site/EpisodeDownload/PB5E7E0AMD9KN

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  2. MythTake - Episode 01 Medea | Podbean

    Who is the real Medea of Greek mythology?  In our very first podcast episode, we will introduce you to this fascinating hero in her most famous appearance from antiquity. We’ll see what she has to say for herself in Euripides’ -Medea- lines 476-492. 

    Passage: Euripides Medea 476-492

    Translation: Euripides. Medea. Trans. A. J. Podlecki. Ed. Stephen Esposito. Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, 2004. Print.

    Music Credits: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Available online at Free Music Archive.

    Brought to you by @darrinsunstrum and @InnesAlison

    view more

    https://www.podbean.com/site/EpisodeDownload/PB5E4A0F3X9K5

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  3. Episode 88: The Long and Short of It | The History of English Podcast

    We just recently discovered your podcast and are enjoying it greatly.

    I’ve always been interested in history and also genealogy or family history.

    I could not help but wonder if this episode might not help explain something that has been quite puzzling about my surname, “Elliott” which has over 80 variants throughout primarily the British Isles & France as well as a few other European countries.

    Keith Elliot Hunter, historian for the Elliot Clan Society in the UK writes that all Elliot surname variants in the British Isles originated from a contingent of Bretons who accompanied William the Conqueror in 1066 and who are thought to have originated in and taken their name from, the HALEGOUËT forest in Brittany.

    Evidently “haleg” mean “willow” in Welsh/Cornish/Breton.

    Greatly simplified, the evolution of the surname may have proceeded something like:

    HALEGOUËT >ELLÉGOUET > ELLÉOUET > ELLIGOTT > ELLIOT.

    Today, the most common variant by far is Elliott but throughout the British Isles are found Eliot, Elyot, Elliot, Eliott, Alliot, McElligott, and even Alyth (a town in Perthshire) to name but a very few of the more common.

    There is an old rhyme which commemorates the more common spelling differences:

    The double L and single T descend from Minto and Wolflee,

    The double T and single L mark the old race in Stobs that dwell.

    The single L and single T the Eliots of St Germains be,

    But double T and double L, who they are nobody can tell.

    It has long been clear that spelling was a free-for-all among early scribes, and since many, if not most, of those they created documents for were illiterate, there were few in any position to debate the scribes’ spelling choices.

    One can occasionally find multiple spellings of the same word or surname on the same page of some old documents.

    This episode of your podcast made me wonder if the various spellings, sometimes with double or single consonants, might not provide clues as to how our surname was pronounced as it migrated through various districts & dialects, and as it moved north from the West Country into Scotland and then Ireland.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2017/01/03/episode-88-the-long-and-short-of-it/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  4. Episode 87: The First Spelling Reformers | The History of English Podcast

    Hi Mary,

    Thanks for the great question! There are actually a lot of answers, so I’ll just mention a few of the major reasons why Modern English spellings seem like such a mess. English spellings started to be fixed by printers in the 1400s and the 1500s. Unfortunately, this period coincided with a wholesale change in the pronunciation of English vowels known as the Great Vowel Shift. This major vowel change, together with other sound changes, meant that the spellings no longer reflected the actual pronunciation of many words. English also borrowed a lot of foreign words and kept the original spellings. However, the pronunciation of those words was Anglicized over time. So again, there was a discrepancy between the spelling and the pronunciation. Also, in the 1600s and 1700s, many classically-trained English scholars tried to reform English spelling to reflect the original etymology of many words. So original Latin letters were introduced even though they weren’t pronounced in English (like the ‘b’ in “debt”). These are just a few of the major causes of the problems with English spellings. Also, many other languages have undergone spelling reforms over the past couple of centuries to fix these types of problems in those other languages. English has never had any such reforms.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/12/07/episode-87-the-first-spelling-reformers/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  5. Episode 86: Family of Rebels | The History of English Podcast

    Tangent: Google’a new Neural net translator has developed its own intermediary language of some kind. So it can be thought how to translate English to Japanese, and English to Korean, the it can figure out how to translate from Korean to Japanese without using English. Pretty wild! What are the chances that studying this intermediate data could give us insights into previously undiscovered links between various languages, splits that must have occurred in the past…?

    Could the intermediate language be close to something like Proto-Indo-European?

    https://techcrunch.com/2016/11/22/googles-ai-translation-tool-seems-to-have-invented-its-own-secret-internal-language/

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/11/15/episode-86-family-of-rebels/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  6. Episode 85: How to Run an Empire | The History of English Podcast

    The massive realm of Henry II extended from southern France through the British Isles. The administration of the so-called “Angevin Empire” required an extensive bureaucracy. In this episode, we examine some of the key government officials who administered the government of England. We also explore the first English settlements in Ireland.

    Map Prepared by Louis Henwood (Click Map for Larger Image)

    http://media.blubrry.com/historyofenglish/p/content.blubrry.com/historyofenglish/Ep85-How-To-Run-An-Empire.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/10/24/episode-85-how-to-run-an-empire/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  7. Episode 84: Law, Order and Murder | The History of English Podcast

    Hi Bob,

    Yes, I’m definitely going beyond 100 episodes. I decided to slow down the story and explore it in more detail. I don’t have a projection at this point, but I suspect that there will be about 150 episodes in total.

    The podcast series about British royalty is interesting. It sounds similar to the Rex Factor podcast which explores the English monarchs one at a time.

    Either way, I definitely have plans for another podcast after this one, but it might not focus on British history.

    I should also note that I am putting together an index of words and topics for the site.

    There will soon be a page with a list of all of the words I have discussed and a specific reference to the episode where that etymology is discussed.

    I don’t really have any intention to provide the specific etymologies on the site itself.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/09/29/episode-84-law-order-and-murder/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  8. Episode 84: Law, Order and Murder | The History of English Podcast

    Hi Bob,

    Yes, I’m definitely going beyond 100 episodes. I decided to slow down the story and explore it in more detail. I don’t have a projection at this point, but I suspect that there will be about 150 episodes in total.

    The podcast series about British royalty is interesting. It sounds similar to the Rex Factor podcast which explores the English monarchs one at a time.

    Either way, I definitely have plans for another podcast after this one, but it might not focus on British history.

    I should also note that I am putting together an index of words and topics for the site.

    There will soon be a page with a list of all of the words I have discussed and a specific reference to the episode where that etymology is discussed.

    I don’t really have any intention to provide the specific etymologies on the site itself.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/09/29/episode-84-law-order-and-murder/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  9. Creole languages are born.

    Listen to Lexicon Valley Episode No. 118: Subscribe in iTunes ∙ RSS feed ∙ Download ∙ Play in another tab How exactly do creole languages come about? I …

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2017/09/john_mcwhorter_on_the_process_by_which_creole_languages_are_born.html

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

  10. Episode 83: A Trilingual Nation | The History of English Podcast

    Hi! I love your podcast and eagerly await each episode. I just have someting (humbly) to add. I took a course in Middle English in college, read sections of the Acrene Wisse for that class, and still own a copy of it in Middle English. The Ancrene Wisse was actually written for monastic women, or anchoresses, not for monks or anchorites. I only mention this because, as I learned it in that class, it is one of the earliest pieces of English literature intended for the use of women, and is also significant for that aspect.

    Looking forward to your next episode! Thank you for all your hard work on this subject. It’s so fascinating.

    .

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/09/05/episode-83-a-trilingual-nation/

    —Huffduffed by jasonbpomerantz

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