jane / tags / history

Tagged with “history” (8)

  1. Interview: Jerry Brotton, Author Of ‘A History of the World in Twelve Maps’ | Mapping Our World View : NPR

    In A History of the World in Twelve Maps, Jerry Brotton examines the construction of a dozen world maps throughout history, and argues that world maps are no more objective today than they were thousands of years ago.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/11/22/165727166/the-motive-of-the-mapmaker

    —Huffduffed by jane

  2. On Point: E-Memory & Human Nature

    Human memory is a famously tricky thing. We remember some things. We forget a lot more. And we shape and sculpt the memories we do have with a vengeance. But more and more, the actual events of our lives are being recorded electronically. In Facebook albums and Twitter posts and smartphone files, yes, but also in thousands of digital transactions we don't even think about. Now, two top Microsoft computer scientists are talking about an era of e-memory — "total recall" — as a revolution in what it means to be human. This hour, On Point: E-memory, total recall, and human nature.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  3. The Story of Economics ‘Monsters’: 30 Mar 2011

    In this three-part series Michael Blastland lays out the history of economic ideas to understand why economics goes wrong and whether it can ever go entirely right. In the third and final programme, 'Monsters', Michael investigates another view of economics: that it is the story of people, how they think and behave.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/moreorless

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/moreorless

    —Huffduffed by jane

  4. The Story of Economics ‘Gods’: 16 Mar 2011

    More or Less creator Michael Blastland lays out the history of economic ideas to understand why economics goes wrong and whether it can ever go entirely right. In the first programme of a three part series, Michael travels to Athens and the site of Aristotle's Lyceum - where economics as a discipline began.

    Tim Harford and the More or Less team investigate numbers in the news. Numbers are used in every area of public debate. But are they always reliable? More or Less tries to make sense of the statistics which surround us. A half-hour programme broadcast at 1330 on Friday afternoons and repeated at 2000 on Sundays on Radio 4. http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/moreorless

    —Huffduffed by jane

  5. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/burke/

    James Burke is a living legend. Or, as he put it, “No-one under the age of fifty has heard of me and everyone over the age of fifty thinks I’m dead.”

    He is a science historian, an author, and a television presenter. But calling James Burke a television presenter is like calling Mozart a busker. His 1978 series Connections and his 1985 series The Day The Universe Changed remain unparalleled pieces of television brilliance covering the history of science and technology.

    Before making those astounding shows, he worked on Tomorrow’s World and went on to become the BBC’s chief reporter on the Apollo Moon missions.

    His books include The Pinball Effect, The Knowledge Web, Twin Tracks and Circles.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  6. When Cinnamon moved markets - Planet Money #148

    Economist editor,Tom Standage, says if you want to get a good picture of world history, you should look at spices.

    In his book, An Edible History of Humanity, Standage writes about how tall tales of carnivorous birds and flying snakes let Arab middleman charge Europeans inflated prices for cinnamon and pepper for years. Standage says it wasn't until an Indian ship went adrift in the Red Sea that the Europeans realized there was an easier route to get all those spices they had been craving.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  7. The Wikipedia entry on the Iraq War in 12 handy bound volumes

    US forces in Iraq were part of a firefight in the city of Fallujah on Thursday. At least six Iraqis were killed. It was not known precisely what role the American troops were playing in the situation. Even though President Obama declared the end of combat missions, the history of the Iraq War is still being written. And it is being written, every day, on Wikipedia. The Iraq War entry on that site is massive, thousands of edits over the years. Still, the only thing most people see is the most recent version. James Bridle is a writer, editor, and publisher in London. He gathered together all the Wikipedia material related to the war from 2004 to 2009 and made a 12 volume set of hard bound books. We talk to James Bridle about war, the memory of the internet, and how to make an accurate accounting on a site that’s always changing. Also in this show, we talk to Anders Wright about Halo Reach.

    http://futuretense.publicradio.org/episode/index.php?id=1135975206

    —Huffduffed by jane