jane / tags / culture

Tagged with “culture” (9)

  1. Cure for the Common Code

    Breaking down the barriers of web publishing by embracing the rise of code education.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/lukas/

    Jenn Lukas is a kick-ass web dev working with the mighty Happy Cog in Philadelphia. As well as speaking at conferences like JSConf, she writes for The Nerdary and has a regular column in .net magazine.

    Jenn is crazy about sports. She’s also crazy about cheese. Sometimes she combines the two.

    When she’s not crafting sites with the finest of web standards, Jenn teaches HTML and CSS for GirlDevelopIt. She is also a world authority on the bloody mary.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  2. Imagined Futures

    “Those who don’t remember history are doomed to repeat it. Those who can’t imagine the future are doomed to fuck it up.”

    Lauren Beukes explores how fiction is a model our brains run to explore other lives and possibilities, overcome issue fatigue and fire our cultural imagination.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/beukes/

    Lauren Beukes is the author of Zoo City, which won the 2011 Arthur C. Clarke award. That’s because it’s bloody brilliant. Seriously, if you haven’t read it, grab a copy now.

    Her first novel, the excellent near-future dystopia Moxyland, was set in Cape Town, where Lauren lives with her husband and daughter. Her next book, The Shining Girls, will be set in Chicago and feature a time-travelling serial killer.

    As well as being a novelist, Lauren is a journalist and has collaborated on television and comic book projects.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  3. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/burke/

    James Burke is a living legend. Or, as he put it, “No-one under the age of fifty has heard of me and everyone over the age of fifty thinks I’m dead.”

    He is a science historian, an author, and a television presenter. But calling James Burke a television presenter is like calling Mozart a busker. His 1978 series Connections and his 1985 series The Day The Universe Changed remain unparalleled pieces of television brilliance covering the history of science and technology.

    Before making those astounding shows, he worked on Tomorrow’s World and went on to become the BBC’s chief reporter on the Apollo Moon missions.

    His books include The Pinball Effect, The Knowledge Web, Twin Tracks and Circles.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  4. BBC - Podcasts - Four Thought: Russell M. Davies 21 Sept 2011

    Four Thought talks include stories and ideas which will affect our future, in politics, society, the economy, business, science, technology or the arts. Recorded live, the talks are given by a range of people with a new thought to share.

    After the internet and social media, what will be the next technological revolution? Writer, blogger and social entrepreneur Russell M. Davies argues that like the early days of blogging, we are about to witness another flowering of individual creativity. This time, he says, it will unleash "all sorts of interesting gadgety things", and determine our relationships with them. "It's about making your own stuff, which might be a bit silly and a bit trivial and pointless, but you get the satisfaction of making it yourself," he says. This revolution in individual gadgetry - and designing our relationship with them - will prove "exciting, radical, life-affirming stuff". Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/fourthought

    —Huffduffed by jane

  5. The Wikipedia entry on the Iraq War in 12 handy bound volumes

    US forces in Iraq were part of a firefight in the city of Fallujah on Thursday. At least six Iraqis were killed. It was not known precisely what role the American troops were playing in the situation. Even though President Obama declared the end of combat missions, the history of the Iraq War is still being written. And it is being written, every day, on Wikipedia. The Iraq War entry on that site is massive, thousands of edits over the years. Still, the only thing most people see is the most recent version. James Bridle is a writer, editor, and publisher in London. He gathered together all the Wikipedia material related to the war from 2004 to 2009 and made a 12 volume set of hard bound books. We talk to James Bridle about war, the memory of the internet, and how to make an accurate accounting on a site that’s always changing. Also in this show, we talk to Anders Wright about Halo Reach.

    http://futuretense.publicradio.org/episode/index.php?id=1135975206

    —Huffduffed by jane

  6. Kevin Kelly on the Future of the Web and Everything Else

    March 26 2007 - Author Kevin Kelly talks about the role of technology in our lives, the future of the web, how to time travel, the wisdom of the hive, the economics of reputation, the convergence of the biological and the mechanical, and his impact on the movies The Matrix and Minority Report.

    —Huffduffed by jane