jane / tags / book:title

Tagged with “book:title” (4)

  1. Kevin Kelly on technology evolving beyond us

    Kevin Kelly, a founding editor of Wired magazine, a former editor and publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, and one of the most compelling thinkers about technology today, talks about his new book, What Technology Wants. Make no mistake: the singularity is near. Kelly discusses the technium–a broad term that encompasses all of technology and culture–and its characteristics, including its autonomy and sense of bias, its interdependency, and how it evolves and self-replicates. He also talks about humans as the first domesticated animals; extropy and rising order; the inevitability of humans and complex technologies; the Amish as technology testers, selecters, and slow-adopters; the sentient technium; and technology as wilderness.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/10/19/kevin-kelly/

    —Huffduffed by jane

  2. Andrew Blum | Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet - Free Library Podcast

    Andrew Blum is a correspondent at Wired and a contributing editor at Metropolis, whose writing about architecture, design, technology, urbanism, art, and travel has appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times, The New Yorker, Slate, and Popular Science. Blum studied English and architecture history at Amherst College, and received his M.A. in human geography from the University of Toronto. From tiny fiber optic cables buried beneath Manhattan’s busy streets to the 10,000-mile-long undersea cable connecting Europe and West Africa, Blum chronicles the intriguing development of the internet in his new book, Tubes.

    http://libwww.freelibrary.org/podcast/index.cfm?podcastID=991

    —Huffduffed by jane

  3. When Cinnamon moved markets - Planet Money #148

    Economist editor,Tom Standage, says if you want to get a good picture of world history, you should look at spices.

    In his book, An Edible History of Humanity, Standage writes about how tall tales of carnivorous birds and flying snakes let Arab middleman charge Europeans inflated prices for cinnamon and pepper for years. Standage says it wasn't until an Indian ship went adrift in the Red Sea that the Europeans realized there was an easier route to get all those spices they had been craving.

    —Huffduffed by jane