jamesh / tags / privacy

Tagged with “privacy” (4)

  1. The snitch in your pocket: making sense of Stingrays - Boing Boing

    At this point, most Americans have acknowledged — and many have de facto accepted — that the government can access our personal data. And sometimes it takes a personal case to understand just how intimate that snooping can get.

    What we haven’t known — and couldn’t quite tell from the 2013 Snowden leak — are the technological details of that surveillance. Nor have we understand how pervasive that technology had become, at even the most local of levels.

    Today, we understand quite a bit more thanks to one man in particular. His name is Daniel Rigmaiden, and while he’s not exactly the knight-in-shining-armor type (he’s a convicted felon who spent years building an almost-air-tight tax fraud scheme), he is the one who figured out how the government tracks us using our cell phones, despite their best efforts to keep it hidden: the Stingray.

    This week, we’ll tell his story on our show. It’s the first full telling since the drama went down.

    —Huffduffed by jamesh

  2. 2030

    Privacy’s dead. What happens next?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/tomscott/

    Tom Scott is from the internet. He is an excellent ambassador, whether it’s skilfully explaining programming concepts or re-enacting cat GIFs.

    He makes entertaining and thought-provoking videos, such as Danger: Humans and Welcome To Life. There’s an ongoing video series called Things You Might Not Know, in which Tom and guests divulge facts that have a significant probabilty of being hitherto-unknown by you, and another series called Tom’s Language Files about linguistics, languages, and love. But mainly linguistics.

    Tom doesn’t just make videos though. He also makes handy online services like the Star Wars Weather Forecast and the Magical Mystical Ley Line Locator.

    —Huffduffed by jamesh

  3. The Digital Human: Conceal

    What is the biggest threat to our privacy: governments, corporate entities or our friends? And do people have different attitudes towards privacy depending on their culture?

    Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’€™re creating with our ‘€˜always on’€™ lives.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/dh

    —Huffduffed by jamesh

  4. Kevin Kelly | Trends and Social Consequences of Technology

    Our long-term interaction with the web will be defined by six trends. These trends will will involve dramatic changes that will make computing more like what we are used to seeing in many of today’s movies. Kevin Kelly explains why he believes that soon the internet will beneficially surround us in ways that most users don’t imagine today.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4930.html#

    —Huffduffed by jamesh