Tagged with “drwho” (7)

  1. Troika #16: Diddly-dum! Diddly-dum!…

    With the new series of Dr Who starting this weekend, I decided it was time for a Troika on the iconic TV theme! There has been a lot of ‘official’ versions and many more covers (including a terrible disco-ified one by Mankind in 1979), but here is the original, along with my two favourite unofficial versions!

    Doctor Who (1963 original theme) - Ron Grainer & Delia Derbyshire Ron Grainer wrote the score, but it was Delia Derbyshire at the BBC Radiophonic workshop that brought it to life, using techniques that she and Dick Mills invented as they went along. It was revolutionary, and their work continues to inspire electronica today, especially in bands like Stereolab

    ‘Dr Qui’ - Bill Bailey Bill Bailey is the first artist to be featured again on Troika, and this time it’s for his Belgian Jazz (with french lyrics - http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Bill_Bailey:Dr._Qui) version of the theme. (He also appeared in the show as Droxil in ‘The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe’ fact fans).

    ‘Dr Who?’ - Orbital (live at Glastonbury) The men with laser beams for eyes regularly perform this lively EDM version in their live set. This one is taken from the 2004 Glastonbury Festival. They came back in 2010, and performed it with the then Eleventh Doctor, Matt Smith.

    P.S - Sorry about the abrupt end to the last track!

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  2. Dr Who at the Proms

    Doctor Who (Matt Smith) and Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) join the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for music by Murray Gold from the drama series plus favourites with a celestial theme.

    (This is the complete concert, including the interval documentary)

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  3. Dr Who at the Proms - Part 2

    The second part of the Doctor Who Prom, with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and London Philharmonic Choir in music from the drama series. Plus works by Orff and Wagner.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  4. Dr Who at the Proms - Part 1

    Doctor Who (Matt Smith) and Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) join the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for music by Murray Gold from the drama series plus favourites with a celestial theme.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  5. Twenty Minutes - Dance of the Daleks

    BBC Radio3 documentary: Matthew Sweet time-travels through Doctor Who’s 47-year history to investigate the weird and wonderful soundworld of its incidental music.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  6. The Doctor and Douglas

    Jon Culshaw travels back in time to look at the man who changed Doctor Who forever: Douglas Adams.

    Broadcast on Fri, 2 Apr 2010, 11:00 on BBC Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  7. The Sculptress of Sound: The Lost Works of Delia Derbyshire

    The broadcaster and Doctor Who fan MATTHEW SWEET travels to The University of Manchester - home of Delia Derbyshire’s private collection of audio recordings - to learn more about the wider career and working methods of the woman who realised Ron Grainer’s original theme to Doctor Who.

    Delia’s collection of tapes was, until recently, in the safekeeping of MARK AYRES, archivist for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Matthew meets up at Manchester University with Mark, along with Delia’s former colleagues from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, BRIAN HODGSON and DICK MILLS - plus former ‘White Noise’ band member DAVID VORHAUS - to hear extracts from the archive, discuss their memories of Delia and the creative process behind some of her material. Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we’ll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual tracks from Delia’s aborted 70’s version. We’ll also feature the make up tapes for her celebrated piece ‘Blue Veils and Golden Sands’, and hear Delia being interviewed on a previously ‘lost’ BBC recording from the 1960s. Matthew’s journey of discovery will take in work with the influential poet Barry Bermange, as well as her 1971 piece marking the centenary of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. This Archive on 4 is brought up to date with an individual track from ‘The Dance’ from the children’s programme ‘Noah’. Recorded in the late 1960s this remarkable tape sounds like a contemporary dance track which wouldn’t be out of place in today’s most ‘happening’ trance clubs.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian