hopkinsju / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (6)

  1. Computerworld Techcast: Ray Kurzweil, Part I: The future of computing

    In this episode of the Computerworld Techcast, Ray Kurzweil, author of The Singularity Is Near, explains the impact of the exponential growth of processing power in computers. In the interview, Kurzweil says that computing advances will go beyond making computers smaller and more powerful — they will eventually lead to pervasive computing, augmented reality, and vastly longer lifespans.Duration: 10 minutes

    http://blogs.computerworld.com/computerworld_techcast_ray_kurzweil_part_i_the_future_of_computing

    —Huffduffed by hopkinsju

  2. Future Sci-Fi - RN Future Tense - 27 January 2011

    Russian/American scientist and author, Isaac Asimov, once wrote: Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today — but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all.

    Now, there's no denying science fiction has long been a popular genre — from print to television to film. But does it have the influence it once had?

    Some argue the exponential rate of technological change makes sci-fi less effective in its ability to predict, inspire and shape the future of the real world.

    Here at Future Tense we're starting the year with a look at the power of science fiction.

    —Huffduffed by hopkinsju

  3. RSA - The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

    The Internet Age: an era of unprecedented freedom in both communication and culture.

    However each major new medium, from telephone to satellite television, has crested a wave of similar idealistic optimism, before succumbing to the inevitable undertow of industrial consolidation. Every once free and open technology has, in time, become centralised and closed; a huge corporate power taking control of the 'master switch.'

    Today, as a similar struggle looms over the internet, increasingly the pipeline of all other media, the stakes have never been higher.

    Tim Wu is a Columbia Law professor, author, policy advocate, who first coined the phrase "net neutrality". He visits the RSA to deliver an essential review of information technology history and to share his unique insight into the next chapter of global communications.

    Speaker: Timothy Wu, Professor at Columbia Law School, policy advocate and author of The Master Switch (Atlantic Books, 2011).

    Chair: Tom Chatfield, author, tech and cultural commentator and game writer.

    http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/the-rise-and-fall-of-information-empires

    —Huffduffed by hopkinsju

  4. A Little Bit Pregnant: Why it’s a Bad Idea to Regulate Computers the Way We Regulate Radios, Guns, Uranium and Other Special-Purpose Tools - Cory Doctorow

    In his keynote speech Cory addresses the issue of computer regulation in general and, more specifically, asks: What happens when we take the failed regulatory model from the copy-right realm and try to import it into other realms too? What are the consequences?

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/a-little-bit-pregnant-cory-doctorow-at-boundaries-frontiers-and-gatekeepers-ischool-conference/

    —Huffduffed by hopkinsju