The Sound of Sports | 99% Invisible

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  1. The Sound of Sports | 99% Invisible

    Way back in October 2011 (see episode #38, true believers!), we broadcast a short excerpt of a radio documentary produced by Peregrine Andrews about faking the sounds of sports on TV broadcasts. It was one of our most popular and provocative programs ever, primarily because people were shocked that any aspect of a sporting event might be faked. Since then, I’ve received several requests from the audience asking where they can hear the full-length documentary. Well today, my friends, you are in luck.

    When we think of the sound of sports on TV or radio, it’s generally commentary. But sports broadcasts would be nothing without all the sounds that are behind the commentary– the crowds, the kicks, the thwacks, and the grunts.

    During the World Cup of 2010, the constant noise of Vuvuzelas made many people realize that the sound of a sports event, something they took for granted, does matter.

    Dennis Baxter’s job is to design the sound of sports, and he is our guide in this documentary. For nearly 20 years he’s worked on the Olympics, defining how the broadcast will sound, always trying to increase drama and excitement. For him, closer is generally better. If he can put a microphone on an athlete, he will.

    At the Oxford-Cambridge boat race, the TV coverage is enhanced by microphones on the cox in each boat. Wimbledon has a special sonic drama all of its own, as we learn from Bill Whiston who mixed the sound of the 2008 finals.

    When good sound isn’t available, it’s not uncommon for a prerecorded sound to be added to cover the shot.

    The experience of “live” events can be highly produced, very different from the experience of being there. Is this enhanced sound so very different from that of a film or a video game? We meet a Hollywood sound effects specialist and a video game sound designer to find out what they do to create a sense of authenticity and excitement. Are they raising our expectations of how “real” sport should sound?

     

    “The Sound of Sport” was produced by Peregrine Andrews for Falling Tree Productions and originally broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

    Music: “Sunlight”- OK Ikumi; “Ping Ping”- Anti-Pop Consortium; “Sifting in Sans”- Set in Sand

    Featured Image: cc photo by Josh Mazgelis

    More details about the UK “Office Hours” with Helen Zaltzman I mentioned at the end of the episode.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-sound-of-sports/

    —Huffduffed by bulkorder

  2. The Sound of Sports | 99% Invisible

    Way back in October 2011 (see episode #38, true believers!), we broadcast a short excerpt of a radio documentary produced by Peregrine Andrews about faking the sounds of sports on TV broadcasts. It was one of our most popular and provocative programs ever, primarily because people were shocked that any aspect of a sporting event might be faked. Since then, I’ve received several requests from the audience asking where they can hear the full-length documentary. Well today, my friends, you are in luck.

    When we think of the sound of sports on TV or radio, it’s generally commentary. But sports broadcasts would be nothing without all the sounds that are behind the commentary—the crowds, the kicks, the thwacks, and the grunts.

    http://99percentinvisible.prx.org/2014/08/11/127-the-sound-of-sports/

    download

    Tagged with sound sports

    —Huffduffed by rgchris

  3. The Sound of Sports | 99% Invisible

    When we think of the sound of sports on TV or radio, it’s generally commentary. But sports broadcasts would be nothing without all the sounds that are behind the commentary– the crowds, the kicks, the thwacks, and the grunts.

    During the World Cup of 2010, the constant noise of Vuvuzelas made many people realize that the sound of a sports event, something they took for granted, does matter.

    Dennis Baxter’s job is to design the sound of sports, and he is our guide in this documentary. For nearly 20 years he’s worked on the Olympics, defining how the broadcast will sound, always trying to increase drama and excitement. For him, closer is generally better. If he can put a microphone on an athlete, he will.

    At the Oxford-Cambridge boat race, the TV coverage is enhanced by microphones on the cox in each boat. Wimbledon has a special sonic drama all of its own, as we learn from Bill Whiston who mixed the sound of the 2008 finals.

    When good sound isn’t available, it’s not uncommon for a prerecorded sound to be added to cover the shot.

    The experience of “live” events can be highly produced, very different from the experience of being there. Is this enhanced sound so very different from that of a film or a video game? We meet a Hollywood sound effects specialist and a video game sound designer to find out what they do to create a sense of authenticity and excitement. Are they raising our expectations of how “real” sport should sound?

     

    “The Sound of Sport” was produced by Peregrine Andrews for Falling Tree Productions and originally broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.

    Music: “Sunlight”- OK Ikumi; “Ping Ping”- Anti-Pop Consortium; “Sifting in Sans”- Set in Sand

    Featured Image: cc photo by Josh Mazgelis

    More details about the UK “Office Hours” with Helen Zaltzman I mentioned at the end of the episode.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-sound-of-sports/

    —Huffduffed by jasonclarke

  4. 99% Invisible-38- Sound of Sport by Roman Mars | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    99% Invisible-38- Sound of Sport

    by Roman Mars

    published on 2011/10/13 02:53:22 +0000

    If Dennis Baxter and Bill Whiston are doing their job right, you probably don’t notice that they’re doing their job. But they are so good at doing their job, that you probably don’t even know that their job exists at all. They are sound designers for televised sporting events. Their job is to draw the audience into the action and make sports sound as exciting as possible, and this doesn’t mean they put a bunch of microphones on the field. This episode of 99% Invisible is produced by Peregrine Andrews for Falling Tree Productions. It is an extract from a much longer, and really stunning doc called “The Sound of Sport.”

    Download 99% Invisible-38- Sound of Sport

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    License: all-rights-reserved

    https://soundcloud.com/roman-mars/99-invisible-38-sound-of-sport

    —Huffduffed by kendrick

  5. 99% Invisible #38: The Sound of Sport

    If Dennis Baxter and Bill Whiston are doing their job right, you probably don’t notice that they’re doing their job. But they are so good at doing their job, that you probably don’t even know that their job exists at all. They are sound designers for televised sporting events. Their job is to draw the audience into the action and make sports sound as exciting as possible, and this doesn’t mean they put a bunch of microphones on the field.

    Peregrine Andrews produced this piece narrated by Dennis Baxter for Falling Tree Productions for BBC Radio4. It is an extract from a much longer, and really stunning doc called “The Sound of Sport.”

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-38-the-sound-of-sport/

    —Huffduffed by chgroenbech

  6. i-shrine

    Produced by Peregrine Andrews Duration: 27’39"

    Broadcast 21st May 2010 on BBC Radio 4

    How has new technology changed the way we remember the dead? This programme looks at the significance of electronic mementoes, such as answer machine messages, text messages and facebook pages. In the past we might have treasured the letters and photographs of a loved one who died, perhaps put them in a special box or displayed them on a mantelpiece. But now that so much, perhaps all, correspondence and photography is no more than computer data, do we still treasure it in the same way?

    —Huffduffed by jshield

  7. Takeshi Murata and Robert Beatty | Bad at Sports

    This week: San Francisco checks in with a great interview. Bad at Sports contributors Brian Andrews and Patricia Maloney sat down with artist Takeshi Murata and sound designer Robert Beatty on November 9, 2013, at Ratio 3, in San Francisco, to discuss Murata’s most recent digitally animated video, OM Rider(2013).

    http://badatsports.com/2013/episode-431-takeshi-murata-and-robert-beatty/

    —Huffduffed by lach