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Tagged with “the” (6)

  1. Safecracking

    Despite many appearances in film and television, fairly little is widely known about how safes can be opened without the proper combination or key. This talk will attempt to address some of the questions commonly asked about the craft, such as is it really possible to have a safe open in a minute or two using just a stethoscope and some clever fingerwork? (Yes, but it will take a bit more time than a few minutes.) Are the gadgets used by secret agents in the movies ever based on reality? (Some of them.) The talk will cover several different ways that safes are opened without damage, as well as the design of one lock that is considered completely secure.

    —Huffduffed by gramondo

  2. The Sporkful - Coffee

    Marc Maron from the podcast WTF guests to talk everything coffee, espresso, machiato, cappucino, and more, from Starbucks to Dunkin Donuts, from the merits of adding milk to his addiction to caffeine. We also briefly discuss the Jewish holiday of Purim and hamentashen cookies.

    —Huffduffed by gramondo

  3. Richard Dawkins | The God Delusion

    The preeminent scientist Richard Dawkins is Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. Discover magazine recently dubbed him "Darwin’s Rottweiler" for his fierce defense of evolution and Prospect magazine placed him among the top three public intellectuals (with Noam Chomsky and Umberto Eco) worldwide. His award-winning books include The Selfish Gene, in which he first introduced the concept of the "meme," and The Blind Watchmaker, a convincing account of neo-Darwinian theory. In The God Delusion, Dawkins asserts the irrationality of belief in God and the grievous harm religion has done society, from the Crusades to 9/11.

    http://libwww.freelibrary.org/podcast/?podcastID=8

    —Huffduffed by gramondo

  4. Meet The Author: Richard Dawkins

    He’s the King of All the Atheists, and now Richard Dawkins is hammering home what he sees as his key argument against the existence of God. In his book, The Greatest Show on Earth, Dawkins aims to put the theory of evolution in a factually unassailable position.

    Here, at Adelaide Writers’ Week in 2010, he goes through his book chapter by chapter, and in doing so attempts to convince his audience of the absolute veracity of Darwin’s theories. Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 00:00:00 -0800 Location: Adelaide, Australia, Adelaide Writers’ Week, Australian Broadcasting Corporation

    Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2010/03/01/Meet_The_Author_Richard_Dawkins

    —Huffduffed by gramondo

  5. Alien Invasion

    They’re heeeere! Yes, aliens are wreaking havoc and destruction throughout the land. But these aliens are Arizona beetles, and the land is in California, where the invasive insects are a serious problem.

    And what of space-faring aliens? We have those too: how to find them, and how to protect our planet – and theirs.

    From Hollywood to SETI’s hi-tech search for extraterrestrials, aliens are invading Are We Alone?

    Guests:

    • Paul Davies – Physicist and author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence
    • Frank Drake- Senior Scientist, SETI Institute
    • Andy Ihnatko – Journalist and tech blogger
    • Margaret Race – Biologist and Principal Investigator at the SETI Institute
    • Margaret McLean – Director of bioethics at the Markkula Center for Ethics, Santa Clara University
    • Mark Hoddle – Biological Control Specialist at the University of California, Riverside
    • Vanessa Lopez – Graduate student in entomology, University of California, Riverside

    http://radio.seti.org/episodes/Alien_Invasion

    —Huffduffed by gramondo

  6. The Secret Scientists, Part Two

    In part two Dr Jackie Stedall and Professor Ian Stewart tell us the story of Al-Khwarismi, the mathematician who introduced the world to the radical system of Hindu numerals - the numbers zero to nine - and how the word algebra comes from the Arabic title of one of his books.

    In his book he revolutionised maths by focussing on the relationships between numbers rather than simply using maths to find the answer to particular problems. For mathematicians today, this was a vital development in our understanding. Another legacy was his name which gives us the modern word algorithm, a process that lies at the heart of how all computers work.

    Professor Nader el-Bizri tells also of the great Ibn al-Haytham, who first realised how it is that vision works.

    His work with light and optics was so revolutionary that he could be seen as the father of physics, rivaling Isaac Newton for the title.

    Perhaps more importantly, he was also the instigator of what we now call the scientific method. Some people have thought that such a precise approach to scientific study began in Europe, hundreds of years later.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/documentaries/2009/04/090421_secretscience2.shtml

    —Huffduffed by gramondo