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george08 / George Oates

I fancy myself as a shallow polymath. And I’ve just got my first iPhone. That’s why I’m here.

There is one person in george08’s collective.

Huffduffed (8)

  1. Information Is Beautiful

    In an age of high-speed living and info overload, visualized information has incredible potential to help us quickly understand, navigate and find meaning in a complex world.

    The use of infographics, data visualisations and information design is a rising trend across many disciplines: science, design, journalism and web. At the same time, daily exposure to the web is creating a incredibly design-literate population. Could this be a new language?

    In his session, David will share his passion for this merging of design, information, text and story to unveil some of the interesting, unexpected and sometimes magical things that happen when you visualise data, knowledge and ideas. And, admitting that his book is as full of mistakes as it is successes, he’ll also explore some of the common pitfalls, traps and FAILS that dog this young design form.

    Using examples from his book and blog, he’ll share thoughts on what makes a successful information visualisation and journalistic tips, especially for designers, on how to zero in on interesting data and subjects—and how designing information can expose your own biases and change your views about the world. Oh yeah!

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/david-mccandless

    David McCandless is a London-based author, data-journalist and information designer, working across print, advertising, TV and web. His design work has appeared in over forty publications internationally including The Guardian and Wired. He champions the use of data visualisations to explore new directions for journalism and to discover new stories in the seas of data surrounding us. His blog and book ‘Information Is Beautiful’ are dedicated to visualising ideas, issues, knowledge and data—all with the minimum of text.

    —Huffduffed by george08

  2. Full Interview: Amanda Cox on Data Visualization | Spark | CBC Radio

    As the streams of data that surround us increase, a challenge has emerged for media organizations. How do we show the information in ways that people will both understand and enjoy? That’s exactly Amanda Cox’s job at the New York Times. In 2005, Amanda became a graphics editor there and since then, she and her colleagues have turned the new practice of interactive data visualization into something of an art.

    —Huffduffed by george08

  3. D&D Penny Arcade Podcast: Series Three, Episode 5

    In this episode, the members of Acquisitions Incorporated learn about the death and dying rules… but does it concern them, the boar, or the dwarf? They also learn that intimidating a bloodied enemy may force that enemy to surrender… may. And finally, they learn the might of a solo monster—essentially, four monsters wrapped in one.

    Once through the guarded door, Acquisitions Inc. enters the mausoleum. The ground floor opens before them into a giant foyer, with a giant staircase leading up to balcony surrounded by a stone railing. Two braziers flank the doorway, emitting great gouts of flame, beyond which sits a gong. Two doors lead off from the sides of the foyer, one to a dining room, the other to a study.

    But the foyer is not unoccupied. Waiting on the first landing of the staircase is the ghost of an elf… an elf with a very odd request.

    —Huffduffed by george08

  4. The Bestiary

    Once upon a time people believed the world was populated with terrible monsters and fabulous mythical beasts. They thought if they just searched long enough and hard enough, they’d find them. In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, the mythical beasts of folktale and legend, and the modern researchers who are still hunting for them. Tales of sea serpents, lake monsters, and abominable snowmen.

    From http://www.clampants.com/archives/000656.html

    —Huffduffed by george08

  5. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Monsters

    http://www.wpr.org/book/100725a.cfm

    SEGMENT 1:

    Here there by monsters is what it used to say on the edges of maps, and it describes the show pretty well. We start cartoonist Lynda Barry, who reminisces about her favorite monsters. Then we continue with Justin Cronin, whose novel "The Passage" has been described as "an engrossingly horrirfic account of a post-apocalyptic America." He tells Jim Fleming the idea came out of a discussion with his nine-year-old daughter.

    SEGMENT 2:

    Stephen Asma teaches philosophy at Columbia College in Chicago. He talks to Anne Strainchamps about his book "On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears." Joshua Blu Buhs is an independent scholar and the author of "Bigfoot: The Life and Times of a Legend." But he tells Steve Paulson he doesn’t really think the creature exists.

    SEGMENT 3:

    Richard Holmes is fascinated by what he calls "The Age of Wonder." The subtitle of his book is "how the romantic generation discovered the beauty and the terror of science," and he tells Steve Paulson about how Mary Shelley’s "Frankenstein" came directly out of the scientific climate of the time.

    —Huffduffed by george08

  6. Versatility and the Gloomy Stores of History

    ‘London Booksites: Places of Printing and Publication before 1800’, written and delivered by Professor James Raven

    Lecture 2: ‘Versatility and the Gloomy Stores of History’, introduced by David Pearson

    The 2010 series of lectures offers fresh perspectives on the early modern and 18th-century book trade in England. London dominated this industry, but relatively little has been known about the commercial environments in which books were published.

    Recorded in the Conference Centre on 3 November 2010

    —Huffduffed by george08

  7. John Thompson on the Merchants of Culture - RN Book Show - 3 February 2011

    VERY GOOD outline of publishing history and state of play today! - Since the invention of the printing press, the book publishing industry has more or less continued in the same vein for about 500 years. Yet Cambridge professor of sociology John B Thompson says we know very little about how the industry is organised today, and exactly how it is changing.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bookshow/stories/2011/3128700.htm

    —Huffduffed by george08

  8. Complete Audio: Jeffrey Zeldman: Awesome Internet Design Panel from SXSW Interactive 2011 - Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report

    Mandy Brown, Roger Black, Daniel Mall and Jeffrey Zeldman discuss the state of web design and publishing at SXSW Interactive, Sunday March 13, 2011.

    http://www.zeldman.com/2011/04/12/complete-audio-jeffrey-zeldmans-awesome-internet-design-panel-from-sxsw-interactive-2011/

    —Huffduffed by george08