Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

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  1. A Cunning Plan

    Inventing the next twenty years, strategic foresight, fictional futurism and English rural magic: Warren Ellis attempts to convince you that they are all pretty much the same thing, and why it was very important that some people used to stalk around village hedgerows at night wearing iron goggles.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/warrenellis/

    Warren Ellis is a writer. He is not the violinist in the Bad Seeds.

    Some of the things he has written have pictures in them, like Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority. Some of the things he has written are constructed entirely from words, like Crooked Little Vein and the best-selling Gun Machine.

    Gun Machine is currently being developed for television. His book Red was adapted for the big screen in 2010. We shan’t hold it against him.

    You can find him on Twitter, on Tumblr, on This Is My Jam, and you used to be able to find him in Second Life, but most importantly, he has his own website because he’s down with the Indie Web.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Upplýsingamiðlun

    Brian Suda is a Master Informatician based in Iceland working on Upplýsingamiðlun, or data visualisations. He’s the author of Designing with Data, which is an introduction to those who have to create charts and graphs for a living, but could be doing it better.

    Brian talks with us about collecting data, the growth in the data and technology sector, the difference between data visualisations and infographics, and the importance of telling a good story. He also provides great tips on getting started in this exciting field and some resources for listeners.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. dConstruct 2015: Ingrid Burrington

    Jeremy and Ingrid geek out together on the physical infrastructure of the internet, time travel narratives, and William Gibson’s The Peripheral (contains a spoiler warning, but no actual spoilers).

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

    A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012.

    Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there’s a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Make Life Work with Brian Suda – Make Life Work

    The one when Si talks to Brian about innovating with football tech, AR being better than VR and living in Iceland.

    23 October 2020 (Duration: 51:08 — 46.9MB)

    Brian Suda – master informatician in Iceland – has worked with Si on a number of side projects in the past. He’s always managed to balance a healthy balance between his freelance gig, plenty side projects and enjoy giving back to the community.

    Show Notes: * (optional.is) * World Cup Kick Off (v4) * 1000 100 True Fans by Kevin Kelly * A Practical Guide to Designing with Data * Newsletters iOS app

    https://makelifeworkpodcast.com/brian-suda/

    —Huffduffed by chrisaldrich

  6. Brian McCullough: History in the digital age

    Social media has changed the game for history, says Brian McCullough. Just think of all of the rich, first-hand data those posts and tweets and photos will provide to future historians.

    Brian McCullough is creator of the Internet History Podcast, an oral history of the internet and its key players. Now an expert on this largely unchronicled time period, Brian is currently writing an actual book on the subject: How the Internet Happened, due to be published in fall 2017 by Liveright/WW Norton.

    The TED Residency program is an incubator for breakthrough ideas. It is free and open to all via a semi-annual competitive application. Those chosen as TED Residents spend four months at TED headquarters in New York City, working on their idea. Selection criteria include the strength of their idea, their character, and their ability to bring a fresh perspective and positive contribution to the diverse TED community.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWI3WdRo5DA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 03 May 2017 00:14:15 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

    The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

    James Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-wrangling-time-the-form-and-future-of-the-book/

    —Huffduffed by adactio