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gdhamell / Griffin D. Hamell

Writer, Designer, and Cultural Anthropologist.

There are no people in gdhamell’s collective.

Huffduffed (4)

  1. American Spirit: A History of the Supernatural

    Halloween – despite its solemn Celtic roots – has become a safe way for Americans to transgress social norms and toy with the idea of ghosts in a family-friendly fashion. But for some, spirits from another plane have always been a very real part of life on this plane.

    On this Halloween special, the History Guys explore Americans’ relationship with ghosts, spirits, and witches throughout our nation’s history. Why were colonists so fearful of New England “witches”? How is it that progressive social reformers found a home in the Spiritualist movement of the 19th century? Why do new media technologies always conjure talk of the undead? Can social upheaval help explain our history with the ineffable?

    —Huffduffed by gdhamell

  2. The Zombie Network: Beware ‘Free Public WiFi’ : NPR

    It’s in your airports, your coffee shops and your libraries: "Free Public WiFi."

    Despite its enticing name, the network, available in thousands of locations across the United States, does not actually provide access to the Internet. But like a virus, it has spread — and may even be lurking on your computer right now.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130451369

    —Huffduffed by gdhamell

  3. Merlin Mann: Productivity Demiurge (or) My Job Isn’t Abusive, I Just Ran Into The Door

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    Tagged with productivity

    —Huffduffed by gdhamell

  4. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by gdhamell