fjordaan / tags / book:author

Tagged with “book:author” (15)

  1. Cory Doctorow on the fight for a configurable and free internet - O’Reilly Media

    On the current “tech lash”: Doctorow welcomes the tech lash we’re seeing, because “on the one hand, we’re very worried that a small coterie of unaccountable technologists can write code that changes the lives of billions of people for the worse. But it seems like the mainstream of the critique of that won’t, or can’t, contemplate the possibility that a small group of people might write code that would change people’s lives for the better. That may be the way, or part of the way, that we hold tech to account—by having our own tech, by seizing the means of information.”

    We do need to build a better web: He continues, arguing that there are “companies with a fair degree of impunity to just make ads more invasive, more surveillant, more crappy, and more dangerous. Gathering all that data and warehousing it means that you put it at risk of being breached or subpoenaed or in some other way commandeered and then used against the people who you are advertising to.”

    Go forth and learn from Larry Lessig: Harvard Law school professor and founder of the Creative Commons, Lessig is key here, as Doctorow references: “Larry says that the world is influenced by four forces: 1) code, what’s technologically possible, 2) law, what’s legally available, 3) norms, what’s socially acceptable, and 4) markets, what’s profitable.”

    How we build a better web: Cory makes a two-prong argument on how we build a better web, which starts with a way to “sort the sheep from the goats or the willing from the unwilling…1) we should always design computers that obey their users or owners when there’s a conflict between what that person wants and what some remote entity like, say, a government or a police force or an advertiser or whatever wants. 2) Part two is that it should always be legal to disclose defects in computers. So, if you discover that there’s a problem with a computer that other people rely on, you should be able to warn them even if the manufacturer would prefer that you not.”

    On privacy, data breaches, and a new business as usual: Doctorow opines that we’re not at a watershed moment because: “When the next crisis comes, it reaches an even higher peak. More people care about it and they care about it more intensely. When the crisis passes and the new normal asserts itself, it’s a new normal in which the crisis is more salient yet. That’s how we attain change.”

    The good and bad of technology in the long history of the internet: Doctorow says this is nothing new: "That consciousness has been there since the very beginning, really. No one founds a group like the Electronic Frontier Foundation because they think technology is going to automatically be great. The reason the Free Software Foundation and EFF and other projects try to think about the social implications and how technology could be made safer for human habitation is because of this dual sense that on the one hand, technology held an enormous power to change the balance in social justice struggles and to make people’s lives much better.

    "At the same time, it held an enormous power to make people’s lives much worse and change the balance of power so that it favored the already powerful. Technology has done both. If there’s a real criticism of the techlash it’s that it decides that only one of those things is real. They’re both real. Technology has given us community and it’s given us kindness and it’s given us all kinds of joys and human flourishing. It’s taken those away, too."

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-the-fight-for-a-configurable-and-free-internet

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  2. Brighton SF with Brian Aldiss, Lauren Beukes, and Jeff Noon

    On the eve of dConstruct 2012, Jeremy Keith hosts an evening of readings and chat with three of the brightest stars of the science-fiction world at the Pavilion Theatre in Brighton.

    • Lauren Beukes, author of Moxyland, Zoo City, and The Shining Girls.
    • Jeff Noon, author of Vurt, Automated Alice, and Channel SK1N.
    • Brian Aldiss OBE, author of Hothouse, Nonstop, and the Helliconia trilogy.

    Event details: http://brightonsf.adactio.com/

    Transcript: http://adactio.com/articles/5740/

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  3. Experience Development pt. 2: Progressive Enhancement with Jeremy Keith

    This week Steve and I get a chance to sit down with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft and talk about a topic that is very near and dear to our hearts: Progressive Enhancement. We clear up the common confusion between PE and a similar (but very different) concept in software development called graceful degradation, and even get into JavaScript frameworks. Tune in this week to learn from the master, in part 2 of our Experience Development series.

    http://www.freshtilledsoil.com/experience-development-pt-2/

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  4. Responsive Day Out 3: Aaron Gustafson

    Aaron Gustafson speaking at the third Responsive Day Out in Brighton on June 19th.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  5. ‘That pig was a good influence’ with Jeremy Keith and Jeffrey Zeldman on Unfinished Business

    Last week was Jeffrey Zeldman’s website’s 20th birthday, so this week he joins me and Jeremy Keith on Unfinished Business 110 to talk about the anniversary. We start by discussing Jeremy’s 100 words for 100 days writing project and how it’s inspired me to change the way that I think about writing on our blog and posting to our portfolio. We talk about the importance of writing for yourself as well as for others and why writing on your own website is important. With it being the twentieth anniversary of Jeffrey’s own site, we also talk about whether it’s important to archive older designs for posterity.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/110

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  6. A Cunning Plan

    Inventing the next twenty years, strategic foresight, fictional futurism and English rural magic: Warren Ellis attempts to convince you that they are all pretty much the same thing, and why it was very important that some people used to stalk around village hedgerows at night wearing iron goggles.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/warrenellis/

    Warren Ellis is a writer. He is not the violinist in the Bad Seeds.

    Some of the things he has written have pictures in them, like Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority. Some of the things he has written are constructed entirely from words, like Crooked Little Vein and the best-selling Gun Machine.

    Gun Machine is currently being developed for television. His book Red was adapted for the big screen in 2010. We shan’t hold it against him.

    You can find him on Twitter, on Tumblr, on This Is My Jam, and you used to be able to find him in Second Life, but most importantly, he has his own website because he’s down with the Indie Web.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  7. Information Doesn’t Want to be Free

    There are three iron laws of information age creativity, freedom and business, woven deep into the fabric of the Internet’s design, the functioning of markets, and the global system of regulation and trade agreements.

    You can’t attain any kind of sustained commercial, creative success without understanding these laws — but more importantly, the future of freedom itself depends on getting them right.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/corydoctorow/

    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, blogger and co-editor of Boing Boing.

    He has written a ton of great books. If you haven’t read them, I recommend starting with Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom and working your way through to his collaboration with Charles Stross, Rapture of the Nerds. Don’t miss out on his fantastic Young Adult novels For The Win, Pirate Cinema, Little Brother and its sequel Homeland. They’re all great.

    Former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founder of the Open Rights Group, Cory is a tireless fighter for freedom, campaigning against censorship, DRM, government surveillance and other plagues of our time.

    Cory delivered the closing keynote at the very first dConstruct and it’s truly fitting that he’s back ten years later when the theme of this year’s dConstruct is “Living With The Network.”

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  8. Rendezvous With Rama — Episode 2

    By Arthur C Clarke, dramatised by Mike Walker.

    What is the secret at the heart of the space object known as Rama and why, years after the event, has Commander William Norton never spoken about what he found there?

    Episode 1: http://huffduffer.com/adactio/3213

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  9. Boy from the north country: Bob Dylan in Minnesota | Minnesota Public Radio News

    A new documentary from Minnesota Public Radio News explores Bob Dylan’s Minnesota roots and how they influenced the evolution of his music.

    Dylan spent his formative years in Minnesota; he was born in Duluth and raised in Hibbing. He became a folksinger in Minneapolis. A new documentary from Minnesota Public Radio News explores Dylan’s Minnesota roots and how they influenced the evolution of his music.

    In the documentary, you will hear from Leroy Hoikkala who played the drums in Dylan’s high school band, the Golden Chords. Long-time friend Dick Cohn describes Dylan playing risqué rhythm and blues in St. Paul basements when he was a teenager.

    Marilyn Matheny talks about Dylan finding his voice as a folksinger in the Minneapolis community of Dinkytown. Plus you’ll hear the story of St. Paul native Larry Kegan who was one of Dylan’s closest friends.

    http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/05/21/boy-from-the-north-country-bob-dylan-in-minnesota/

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

Page 1 of 2Older