fjordaan / Francois Jordaan

Director of User Experience at www.isotoma.com, UK open-source software consultancy.

There is one person in fjordaan’s collective.

Huffduffed (190)

  1. The Web Is Agreement

    Nations are intangible. Geographically, France is a tangible, physical place. But France, the Republic, is an idea. Geographically, North America is a real, tangible, physical land mass. But ideas…

    https://medium.com/@adactio/the-web-is-agreement-b6c6b68b1a6

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  2. Episode 75: I Set Up a Fake Child – AppStories

    John is joined by Merlin Mann to discuss managing family tech use and the upcoming iOS 12 Screen Time family features.

    https://appstories.net/episodes/75/

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  3. Episode 10 - What’s wrong with CSS-in-JS?

    In this episode, I talk about CSS-in-JS, why I think its bad for the web, and how to address some of the legitimate problems it’s trying to solve.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/vanillajspodcast/whats-wrong-with-css-in-js
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 07 May 2018 10:04:52 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  4. The Digital Human: Friction

    Aleks Krotoski explores the unforeseen consequences of a frictionless digital life.

    It’s the life we’re told we want, where we just shout at a device and our needs are met as quickly as the supply chain allows. Aleks Krotoski explores frictionless digital living.

    But is there value in friction? Aleks hears from someone who’s life depends on it, mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick. He has a reputation for stacking the odds against himself as much as possible; long routes, often climbed alone in the worst of conditions. Back on the ground Andy also needs friction to not get complacent, accept others views without question, to keep moving forward.

    Without friction we risk falling prey to what economist Umair Haque describes as the infantilisation economy. One where we are diminished by being able to have our every need met by Amazon’s Alexa. And the cost isn’t just to us but also to the army of digital serfs peddling about in all weathers with those trademark boxes on their backs. Its a future that was foreseen as far back as the late 19th century by the likes of Nietzsche in his descriptions of the ‘last men’ a humanity living the most vanilla of existences without challenge or ambition to change.

    Nothing sums this up better than the food replacement industry. No time to shop, cook, chew? Get everything you need nutritionally in a drink like Soylent or Huel - all in the name of efficiency. Its a world that fascinates anthropologist Jan English-Luek who for over 20 years has been observing trends in silicon valley.

    Ultimately Aleks will ask what we’re saving all this time and effort for and do we ever reap the benefits? Or does it just keep us where the digital world wants us, consuming in ever more efficient ways.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b3c76x

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  5. Cory Doctorow on the fight for a configurable and free internet - O’Reilly Media

    On the current “tech lash”: Doctorow welcomes the tech lash we’re seeing, because “on the one hand, we’re very worried that a small coterie of unaccountable technologists can write code that changes the lives of billions of people for the worse. But it seems like the mainstream of the critique of that won’t, or can’t, contemplate the possibility that a small group of people might write code that would change people’s lives for the better. That may be the way, or part of the way, that we hold tech to account—by having our own tech, by seizing the means of information.”

    We do need to build a better web: He continues, arguing that there are “companies with a fair degree of impunity to just make ads more invasive, more surveillant, more crappy, and more dangerous. Gathering all that data and warehousing it means that you put it at risk of being breached or subpoenaed or in some other way commandeered and then used against the people who you are advertising to.”

    Go forth and learn from Larry Lessig: Harvard Law school professor and founder of the Creative Commons, Lessig is key here, as Doctorow references: “Larry says that the world is influenced by four forces: 1) code, what’s technologically possible, 2) law, what’s legally available, 3) norms, what’s socially acceptable, and 4) markets, what’s profitable.”

    How we build a better web: Cory makes a two-prong argument on how we build a better web, which starts with a way to “sort the sheep from the goats or the willing from the unwilling…1) we should always design computers that obey their users or owners when there’s a conflict between what that person wants and what some remote entity like, say, a government or a police force or an advertiser or whatever wants. 2) Part two is that it should always be legal to disclose defects in computers. So, if you discover that there’s a problem with a computer that other people rely on, you should be able to warn them even if the manufacturer would prefer that you not.”

    On privacy, data breaches, and a new business as usual: Doctorow opines that we’re not at a watershed moment because: “When the next crisis comes, it reaches an even higher peak. More people care about it and they care about it more intensely. When the crisis passes and the new normal asserts itself, it’s a new normal in which the crisis is more salient yet. That’s how we attain change.”

    The good and bad of technology in the long history of the internet: Doctorow says this is nothing new: "That consciousness has been there since the very beginning, really. No one founds a group like the Electronic Frontier Foundation because they think technology is going to automatically be great. The reason the Free Software Foundation and EFF and other projects try to think about the social implications and how technology could be made safer for human habitation is because of this dual sense that on the one hand, technology held an enormous power to change the balance in social justice struggles and to make people’s lives much better.

    "At the same time, it held an enormous power to make people’s lives much worse and change the balance of power so that it favored the already powerful. Technology has done both. If there’s a real criticism of the techlash it’s that it decides that only one of those things is real. They’re both real. Technology has given us community and it’s given us kindness and it’s given us all kinds of joys and human flourishing. It’s taken those away, too."

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-the-fight-for-a-configurable-and-free-internet

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  6. Fireside Chat with Jonathan Blow

    From the Interactive Media & Games Seminar Series; Jonathan Blow, President of Thekla, Inc sits down for a fireside chat to discuss his philosophy on game development, sources of inspiration, and advice for aspiring developers.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQJ8iPSO0jE
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 10 Nov 2017 23:08:46 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  7. Innovation Under Austerity: Eben Moglen’s call to arms from the Freedom to Connect conference

    Eben’s keynote is one of the most provocative, intelligent, outrageous and outraged pieces of technology criticism I’ve heard. It’s a 45 minute lecture with a 45 minute Q&A. I ripped the audio and listened to it while walking around town today and kept having to stop and take out my headphones and think for a while.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  8. How technology brings out the worst in us, with Tristan Harris

    I interviewed Harris recently for my podcast. We talked about how the 2016 election threw Silicon Valley into crisis, why negative emotions dominate online, where Silicon Valley’s model of human decision-making went wrong, whether he buys Zuckerberg’s change of heart, and what it means to take control of your time. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity. For the full conversation, which includes the story of what happened when Harris brought legendary meditation teacher Thich Nhat Hanh to Google, listen or subscribe to The Ezra Klein Show.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  9. Functional CSS and Tachyons

    Adam Morse joined the show to talk about Functional CSS and his project Tachyons - a CSS Toolkit that lets you quickly build and design new UI without writing CSS. We talk about Scalable CSS, the difference between "Atomic", "OOCSS", "BEM" and others, semantic class names, and where we go from here.

    download

    Tagged with css

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  10. Paul Gravett interview

    At London Super Comicon last month, Koom got to sit down with Paul Gravett, a comics journalist and exhibition curator. Gravett is currently preparing the touring Asian comics show Mangasia, which will debut in Rome next month. This is a guy who’s read a lot of comics; do they all become a blur after a while? Koom asks him about avoiding burnout, the amount of progress comics have (or haven’t) made toward being accepted by the “art world”, and much more.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

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