felipesunol / tags / design

Tagged with “design” (23)

  1. Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    UX designer Amber Case will share insights from her research in cyborg anthropology and talk about what really makes us human.

    Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist currently working at Vertigo Software. She founded CyborgCamp, a conference on the future of humans and computers. Her main focus is on mobile software, augmented reality and data visualization, as these reduce the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect with information. Case founded Geoloqi.com, a private location sharing application, out of a frustration with existing social protocols around text messaging and wayfinding. She formerly worked at global advertising agency. In 2010, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the Most Influential Women in Tech.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP992057

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  2. Legible London: When is a wayfinding system the answer to a city’s economic future?

    This talk will focus on the capital’s nascent wayfinding system, looking at the strategic rationale for a unified tool to support walking in the capital and an update on the development of the system so far.

    This is a joint talk by Patricia Brown and Kasper de Graaf.

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  3. 37signals podcast - Episode 7 - Ryan Singer on the 37signals design process

    Ryan Singer, who manages 37signals’ products and leads the design team, talks about the company’s design process. He discusses how the design team works with each other and collaborates with programmers. He gives advice to other design/development teams on how to work together smoothly. He talks about how studying Rails has made him a better designer. He explains why Christopher Alexander and Edward Tufte have been big influences. And information architecture even gets some love!

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  4. peterme.com interview with Scott McCloud

    Scott and I recorded a telephone conversation where topics spanned influences, Edward Tufte, the rise of visual expression in every day life, crafting the Google Chrome comic, micropayments, and the basics UX designers should know about crafting comics.

    http://www.peterme.com/?p=717

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  5. Oliver Reichenstein: iA Interview – Why Simplicity Creates Great User Experiences: Design

    In this interview Oliver Reichenstein, Founder of iA, explains the importance of keeping interfaces simple and why current websites are complicated.

    http://www.dormroomtycoon.com/oliver-reichenstein-ia-interview-why-simplicity-creates-great-user-experiences-design/

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  6. David Hill on ThinkPad’s evolution design strategy

    Lenovo designer talks about the flagship laptop brand

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  7. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  8. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  9. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

  10. Jam Session: What Improvisation Can Teach Us About Design

    Have you ever had a spontaneous creative triumph, perfectly in sync with your team?

    A passionate believer in improvisation as a design skill, Hannah’s session will talk about the importance of this technique in her own design process and what lessons can be borrowed from improvised music.

    From the jazz masters to the humble basement band practice, musical concepts such as timing, structure, rolls and expression have many lessons for designers creating an off-the-cuff interface.

    Hannah will explore how the methods of music translate for a design/development team, as well as sharing personal stories and techniques for those times when you need a bit of a jam session.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/hannah-donovan

    Originally from Canada’s icy north, Hannah Donovan is creative director at Last.fm, where she’s worked for the last four years. Before moving to London, she designed websites for Canada’s largest youth-focused agency, working on brands such as Hershey, Heineken and Bic. Hannah also plays the cello with an orchestra and draws monsters.

    —Huffduffed by felipesunol

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