f0rkit / James Deane

Icy hot fronter

There are two people in f0rkit’s collective.

Huffduffed (21)

  1. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  2. Excessive Enhancement: JavaScript’s Dark Side

    Are we being seduced by the animation and rich UI capabilities of modern browsers at the expense of the underlying platform of the Web?

    The Web has entered a new phase in its evolution: The proliferation of a JavaScript enabled audience with increased processing grunt in their devices, better and more ambitious JavaScript developers, and users with an appetite for sophisticated experiences, all seem to be helping to move the web in a rich and exciting direction.

    Good developers understand about graceful degradation, progressive enhancement, unobtrusive JavaScript and the like, so why are we seeing big companies building web offerings with little apparent thought for their impact on the Web?

    We’ll explore this by looking at what the Web was, is now, and might become. We’ll look at examples of exciting user interfaces and sophisticated interactions. We’ll also examine some emerging techniques for providing rich user interactions without hurting the web or killing kittens.

    Phil Hawksworth, Technical Director, R/GA

    Phil began his career building web applications for financial institutions such as Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, and the London Stock Exchange in the late nineties. A focus on web architectures and real-time data delivery lead Phil to a variety of web development roles with particular attention to emerging front-end development techniques and JavaScript application development.

    After several years working on web applications and consulting on web best practices at technology companies such as Verisign, VMware and BT, Phil made the move into the agency world where he managed development teams and architected solutions on projects for clients including of eBay, Sony and BP.

    Phil Hawksworth is a Technical Director at R/GA and enjoys talking about himself in the third person.

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  3. The Auteur Theory Of Design

    Why is it that some projects never rise to the level of the talent of those who made it? It’s oft said regarding good work that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. But sometimes the whole is less than the sum of its parts—a company or team comprised of good people, but yet which produces work that isn’t good.

    In his session, John will explain his theory to explain how this happens—in both directions—based on the longstanding collaborative art of filmmaking. Learn how to recognise when a project is doomed to mediocrity, and, more importantly, how best to achieve collaborative success.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/john-gruber

    John Gruber writes and publishes Daring Fireball, a somewhat popular weblog ostensibly focused on Mac and web nerdery. He has been producing Daring Fireball as a full-time endeavour since April 2006.

    He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and son.

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  4. Kevin Yank – CSS frameworks

    With the proliferation and widespread adoption of JavaScript frameworks, smart developers have wondered if a similar approach to smoothing over the rough spots of CSS might work. Thus, CSS frameworks like Blueprint, YUI Library CSS Tools, Boilerplate, and many others were born. In this session, we will survey the landscape of CSS frameworks and consider how each of them deals with the unique challenge of creating generalised, reusable CSS styles.

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  5. SxSWi 10 - CSS Framework Shootout

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  6. Oooh, That’s Clever! (Unnatural Experiments in Web Design)

    Find inspiration in the ridiculous. See technological quirks as opportunities. Try something previously unheard of with your site design. Laugh in the face of convention. Use and abuse CSS in ways never before imagined. Get away with it. And if it doesn’t work, try something else instead.

    Paul Annett, Clearleft Ltd

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  7. Tim O’Reilly: The War for the Web

    The early days of the internet were truly astonishing. As people came to comprehend the power of networked information, they seized the many opportunities for innovation created by the open architecture of the web. Of course, the browser wars also showed that threats to openness and interoperability were a real danger. Today, Tim O’Reilly worries that escalating competition between large companies and closed platforms may drive the web towards a battle ground of locked down services and proprietary data.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4317.html

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  8. BBC: Desert Island Discs — Morrissey

    Kirsty Young’s castaway on Desert Island Discs is the singer Morrissey.

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  9. Interview with Erin Cummings and America Olivo stars of Bitch Slap

    http://cdn1.libsyn.com/moviemeltdown/The_Sisterhood_of_the_Traveling_Push-up_Bra_Ep_38_-_Turbo_3000.mp3?nvb=20091119104118

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

  10. Bonding over our skateboards

    My friend wanted to learn to skateboard at 30. We grew closer with each failed ollie and attempt to drop into the bowl

    —Huffduffed by f0rkit

Page 1 of 3Older