edsu / Ed Summers

I’m a software developer interested in how the web does and doesn’t work as an archive.

There are nine people in edsu’s collective.

Huffduffed (196)

  1. 8: Stefano Zacchiroli on preserving source code at Software Heritage — FOSS and Crafts

    We are extremely excited to have on our first FOSS & Crafts guest:

    Stefano Zacchiroli!

    (Also known on some corners of the FOSS world as just "zack".)

    Stefano has a long history of FOSS advocacy, most famously for

    his role in Debian

    where he served three well-regarded terms as Debian Project Leader.

    These days zack works on

    Software Heritage,

    an archival institution for software source code.

    We talk about how Software Heritage plays a role in common with other

    GLAM institutions

    (which stands for "Galleries, Libraries Archives and Museums").. o O (Could we possibly have a more appropriate FOSS & Crafts first

    guest episode?)Links:Software HeritageInformation on Software Heritage for developersSupport Software Heritage!InriaDebianGuixSoftware Heritage and GNU Guix join forces to enable long term reproducibilityTragedy of the CommonsFree-rider problemRivalrous vs non-rivalrous goods

    https://fossandcrafts.org/episodes/8-stefano-zacchiroli-software-heritage.html

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  2. Taking Care | Alexander R. Galloway

    I was sad to hear of the passing of philosopher Bernard Stiegler, who died on August 5. I could not have claimed him as a mentor or friend, but I consider myself something of a devotee and our paths did cross on a few occasions. I still recall first meeting him as an impressionable young scholar in his IRCAM laboratory off the Place Georges-Pompidou in Paris. Even with my broken French, he received me graciously in his balcony office overlooking rows of busy researchers. Years afterward a group of us at NYU brought Stiegler to New York in 2009 to speak on "New French Philosophy and Media Theory," where I fumbled through a response to his formidable lecture. After a conference in Paris a few years later, I found myself unable to attend a dinner at Stiegler’s house, a social faux pas that set the tenor for the rest of our (non) acquaintanceship. Naively I asked him to blurb a book of mine but, alas, he politely declined. A friend of his confided in me that Stiegler was put off by my treatment of him in Les nouveaux réalistes (The New Realists), and that Stiegler refused to be labeled a "realist" of any kind. (Of course that was never my intention; Stiegler was the counterpoint there, not the specimen.) Later the missed connections turned into something of an absurd game, at least for me. Stiegler was scheduled to keynote a conference in Weimar last year where I was also in attendance, but he had to cancel at the last minute. Then similar arrangements were announced for an event in Italy two months ago that was also eventually canceled, this time due to Covid.

    To celebrate Stiegler’s life and his influence on me and many others, I wanted to upload the original audio file from my lecture "Bernard Stiegler, or Our Thoughts Are With Control." This was the second of five sessions collected in the pamphlet series French Theory Today, and later revised for French publication as Les nouveaux réalistes.

    "Bernard Stiegler, or Our Thoughts Are With Control" (download mp3)

    http://cultureandcommunication.org/galloway/mp3/Galloway_Stiegler_TPS_26Oct2010.mp3Also of potential interest is the informal "Stiegler glossary" I prepared several years ago to assist in wrangling Stiegler’s sometimes formidable technical vocabulary. The glossary probably needs some updating, but might be helpful nonetheless particularly for those coming to his work for the first time. Most recently I had the opportunity to contribute (with co-author Jason LaRiviere) to a special issue of boundary 2 on the work of Stiegler under the heading "Bernard Stiegler: Amateur Philosophy."

    Stiegler wrote about philosophy and technology, about fault and accident, about forgetting and remembering. He had his Derrida side, of course, but I always preferred the Heidegger side. He was a great champion of Simondon, which I suspect added to the allure in the English speaking world where Simondon had remained untranslated for so long. Stiegler has pride of place in the film The Ister (2004), one of the few decent films made about philosophy. At the same time Stiegler had an outsize influence in other disciplines like media studies, given how much attention he gave over the years to technology. "After Plato and Derrida, it was Bernard who became the pharmacologist of technology," wrote Yuk Hui a few days ago, and I leave it to him to recount his memories of Stiegler in this moving commemoration.

    Bernard Stiegler, New York University, April 2, 2009

    http://cultureandcommunication.org/galloway/taking-care

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  3. Code Ethnography And The Materiality Of Power | STS Infrastructures

    Pre-Recorded Presentation "Code Ethnography And The Materiality Of Power In Digital Communication Infrastructures", given at the EASST/4S 2020-Conference within the Session "Digital Experiments in the Making I: Epistemological And Ethical Considerations".

    https://stsinfrastructures.org/content/code-ethnography-and-materiality-power

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  4. Episode 40 - Philosophy

    Richard F Adams speaks to Graham Harman, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles.

    Graham is known for his work with the metaphysics of objects and in developing of "object-oriented ontology". His recent book, "Artful Objects" is about art and the business of speculative realism. During the episode, the pair discuss philosophy, art, virtual reality and - of course - object-oriented ontology.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/techniqueuk/episode-40-philosophy
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon Jun 1 15:52:25 2020 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  5. 2019 SSRC Fellow Lecture: Lorraine Daston

    Lorraine Daston, Director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, speaks on "Mechanical Rules before Machines: Rules and Paradigms."

    With responses by: - Helen Nissenbaum, Professor of Information Science and Director of the Digital Life Initiative, Cornell Tech - Frank Pasquale, Professor of Law at University of Maryland Carey School of Law


    About the Lecture:

    Long before there were computers or even reliable calculating machines, there were algorithms, recipes, and other rigid rules. But for just as long, stretching back to ancient Greece and Rome and continuing through the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century, the rule-as-algorithm coexisted peacefully and fruitfully with another idea of a rule: the rule-as-pattern. For us, who live in the age of algorithms, this centuries-long cohabitation between the most rigid of rules—the algorithm to be followed to the letter—and the most supple of rules—the pattern or model to be imitated but not slavishly copied—seems paradoxical. Lorraine Daston’s new work analyzes how this paradox became thinkable, and how rules became rigid.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=6xErFnyjMAA&feature=emb_logo
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat Feb 15 13:48:46 2020 Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  6. Tim Maughan’s ‘Infinite Detail’ Book Launch with McKenzie Wark | The New School

    Tim Maughan returns to New York City to launch his debut novel ‘Infinite Detail in a live discussion moderated by McKenzie Wark at The New School (http://newschool.edu). Infinite Detail presents a prophetic portrait of the collapse of the networked world and the ways in which a spectrum of people — from hackers to gangsters to virtual psychics — deal with the fallout.

    Described by Warren Ellis as “the new required reading for the future’s next fifteen minutes", Infinite Detail urges readers to reconsider the consequences of digital entwinement, the methods of protest against it, and the ways in which human society can be played and preyed upon by the environment it exists in.

    Liberal Studies | https://www.newschool.edu/nssr/liberal-studies/

    Hosted in collaboration by The New School’s Liberal Studies and Culture and Media Studies departments, and MSD x FSG, the evening will also include a discussion on the future of smart cities, whether we can ever return to the pre-digital age, and the ways in which science-fiction can act as a critical means of navigating the future.

    Schedule: 6:30 -7PM: Reception 7 - 8PM: Moderated discussion of Infinite Detail with McKenzie Wark 8 - 8:30PM: Audience Q&A 8:30 - 9:30PM: Drinks and mingle

    THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH | https://www.newschool.edu/nssr/

    Wed…

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15GJLMRyWxU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed Feb 12 12:28:24 2020 Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  7. Sofia Olascoaga - RWM #287

    SON[I]A

    sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006. SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA. This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi.

    https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/sofia-olascoaga-main/capsula

    —Huffduffed by edsu

  8. Nora Sternfeld - RWN #296

    SON[I]A

    sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006. SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA. This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi.

    https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/nora-sternfeld/capsula

    —Huffduffed by edsu

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