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  1. Trackers: The Sound of 16-Bit

    Next up: RetroAhoy. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ahoy

    0:00 Introduction 0:50 The Dawn of 16-Bit Computing 3:08 Multimedia Powerhouse 4:20 Early Amiga Music Software 6:40 SoundMonitor 8:40 The Ultimate Soundtracker 12:08 ST-01 Samples 13:24 Soundtracker’s Commercial Fate 14:02 The Demoscene 16:00 Early Soundtracker Clones 19:21 Noisetracker 20:14 Tracker Musicians 21:36 Doskpop 21:56 Chiptunes 23:15 Protracker 24:03 MED / OctaMED 25:28 Trackers in the Mainstream 26:45 Later Amiga Trackers 27:48 PC Audio 28:37 MIDI Soundcards 29:34 Screamtracker 30:54 Second Reality 32:02 FastTracker 32:45 Impulse Tracker 33:29 The Advent of CD-ROM 34:26 Epic MegaGames 36:38 Contemporary Trackers 38:28 The Sound of 16-Bit 39:16 Finding Out More 40:42 Credits

    Music featured: Kenet & Rez - Unreal Super Hero 3 Walkman - Let’s Hear My Baby Bill Williams - Alley Cat Macintosh Startup Chime Stuntcopter Gameplay Audio David Whittaker - Speedball (Atari ST) POW - Wonderful Life Fred / La Marque Jaune - The Sign Of The Death Deluxe Music Construction Set - Bach Fugue in G Minor Chris Huelsbeck - Shades Karsten Obarski - Amegas Karsten Obarski - Crystal Hammer Comrade J - Fairlight Mahoney - Ghost Horace Wimp - Running Water Karsten Obarski - Telephone Diz - Unit 5 Uncle Tom - Occ San Geen Banana - Echoing Luxor - Cou…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roBkg-iPrbw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue Nov 23 20:54:10 2021 Available for 30 days after download

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  2. IAB UK Podcast Upfronts 2021 x Fresh Air Production

    Fresh Air is the UK’s leading producer of bespoke podcasts for brands. We’ll be joined by the clients and talent behind two of our recent shows – Call of the Wild for WWF and Rewirement for Legal & General – to hear how they made podcast content that audiences love while achieving their brand objectives. How do you decide on the right format? Why would talent be interested? How time consuming is it? What are the best ways of promoting your podcast, and how do you measure success? We’ll also hear from Pacific Content – the leaders in branded podcasts for North America – to explore how to make truly global audio content.

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    Original video: https://youtube.com/watch?v=_ZlxsYWFuZc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun Oct 17 10:22:20 2021 Available for 30 days after download

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  3. Bo Burnham vs. Jeff Bezos - Video Essay

    COVID make man sad

    Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cjthex Twitter: https://twitter.com/cjthex Insta: https://www.instagram.com/cjthex/

    Edited by CJ The X & Ben From Canada

    Spawn Point: 0:00

    Checkpoint 1: Transhumanism 28:29

    Checkpoint 2: Soul 1:04:00

    Checkpoint 3: Politics 1:51:54

    Bibliography:

    • Everything

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvYcunuF3Eo
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun Aug 22 14:20:02 2021 Available for 30 days after download

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  4. Sue MacGregor brings together the satirists who launched Private Eye magazine in 1961

    On 25th October 1961 a scrappy magazine containing six pages of jokes and cartoons, printed on yellow paper, appeared in coffee shops in London’s South Kensington. More than fifty years on Private Eye, is Britain’s bestselling current-affairs magazine and copies of the rare first edition, which cost sixpence, are now worth over a thousand pounds. "In the beginning, if we had an aim, it was to provide an alternative to Punch, which was then like the Bank of England," says the Eye’s former editor Richard Ingrams. Private Eye’s early covers had great shock value. Gerald Scarfe made his name there, depicting Harold Macmillan posing naked in the chair associated with Profumo Affair model Christine Keeler. He later drew Harold Wilson kneeling behind Lyndon B Johnson in support of the Vietnam War, pulling down the president’s trousers and licking his bottom. The magazine quickly built a reputation for breaking stories that other papers would not print, taking on the rich and powerful and risking expensive libel actions that threatened to close the magazine down. Reunited to look back on the launch and development of Private Eye are its two first editors Christopher Booker and Richard Ingrams, long time cartoonists Barry Fantoni and Gerald Scarfe, and publisher Peter Usborne. Producer: Emily Williams Series Producer: David Prest A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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  5. Sue MacGregor reunites the pop hitmakers of the 1980s.

    "I had a vision of Motown-type songs with more modern chords and techno, gay, disco rhythms." When pop impresario Pete Waterman suggested collaborating with song-writers and musicians Matt Aitken and Mike Stock in 1985, they had little idea of what an impact they were going to have on the music industry. Their musical template included a take on ‘HI-NRG’, a sound that had been particularly popular in gay clubs of the North of England. Waterman was a frequent DJ at the clubs and was well acquainted with the dance-floor lights that were triggered by the sounds of the particular record being played. "When one of our records came on, it was louder than the previous one and the lights would go off like fireworks" says Waterman. ‘You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)’ by Dead or Alive, reached number one in December 1984 and the writing, production and management trio had hits with Bananarama, Donna Summer, and Divine - but their real achievement was in breaking the careers of new artists like Rick Astley, Sonia, Sinitta, and Mel and Kim. The triumph was in spotting that two stars of a cult Australian TV soap could become pop giants. Jason Donovan and Kylie Minogue, both together and separately, would go on to top charts around the globe. Sue MacGregor is joined by Sinitta and Jason Donovan, together with Pete Waterman and recording engineer Phil Harding, to re-live the days when their unique sound ruled the airwaves. Producer: Emily Williams Series Producer: David Prest A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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  6. Sue MacGregor reunites the original creators and cast of The Fast Show

    The first episode of The Fast Show in 1994 had twenty seven sketches in just half an hour. Charlie Higson and Paul Whitehouse, former writers for Harry Enfield, created a concept which re-invigorated the sketch show format and crammed it with catch-phrases. In this special Christmas night edition of The Reunion, Sue MacGregor brings the cast back together to reflect on the series which launched their careers. Higson and Whitehouse recruited young stand-up comedians whose worked they liked, such as Caroline Aherne , John Thomson , Simon Day and Felix Dexter, alongside actors such as Mark Williams and Paul Shearer. This process involved each ‘auditioning’ their proposed character in front of the ensemble. Competitive Dad, the obscene Suits You tailors, Jazz Club, Does My Bum Look Big in This?, and the touching repressed romance of Ted and Ralph, scored a very high strike rate for introducing catchphrases and comedy characters to schools and work places around the country. Some characters prompted spin-offs, such as Swiss Tony (Higson) the coiffed car salesman who compares everything to ‘making love to a beautiful woman’, and football pundit Ron Manager (Whitehouse). We also hear from collaborators such as Kathy Burke, Harry Enfield, Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer, as well as TV critic Matthew Norman who wrote a famously fierce review of the first series. Producer: Peter Curran Series Producer: David Prest A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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  7. Kirsty Wark reunites the team behind 90s TV news parody The Day Today.

    First broadcast in 1994, this six-part series savaged the business of TV news. Coming off the back of the hugely successful and award-winning Radio 4 comedy On the Hour, Armando Iannucci, Chris Morris and cast brought their characters into the living rooms of millions. There was hapless sports reporter Alan Partridge, Peter O’Hanraha-hanrahan, Rosy May and the eponymous newsreader and host Chris Morris. Satirising the form of news presentation, with a groundbreaking use of comedic graphics and music that always went on slightly too long, the joke was always on the pomposity of news and how it was presented. Armando Iannucci, co-creator (with Chris Morris) and series producer, came up with the concept while on a BBC training course. Patrick Marber played hapless reporter Peter O’Hanraha-hanrahan among other characters. David Schneider, who was in a double act at university with Armando, contrived the very first early demos and was a regular cast member throughout. Steve Coogan was drafted in after the initial pilot for On The Hour to help create a realistic sports reporter, who later morphed into Alan Partridge. Doon Mackichan played multiple characters in The Day Today, as well as shows that followed, such as Brass Eye and Alan Partridge. Presenter: Kirsty Wark Producer: Simon Jarvis Series Producer: David Prest A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

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  8. Sue MacGregor reunites Sir David Attenborough with the team behind Life on Earth.

    Life on Earth was the first natural history blockbuster on television. Written and narrated by David Attenborough, it told the story of evolution in thirteen weekly instalments, stunning viewers with incredible underwater photography, and astonishing close-ups of creatures never before seen on British screens. Broadcast in 1979, it took three years to make and involved a staggering one and a half million miles of travel. Viewers were exposed to more than 650 different species of animal, in a survey of life from bacteria to man and all in between. In The Reunion, Sir David Attenborough is reunited with some of the team he worked with on the series. Richard Brock produced the popular episode on amphibians featuring extraordinary varieties of frog: one whose young emerge from under the skin on its back and another whose male incubates the eggs in his vocal sac, ultimately giving birth through his mouth. Assistant producer Mike Salisbury recalls the difficulties filming lions in Tanzania that eventually resulted in a groundbreaking depiction of a lion-hunt. The most enduring sequence in the series was David Attenborough’s astonishing encounter with gorillas in the mountains of Rwanda, frequently voted one of the top TV moments of all time. He and cameraman Martin Saunders reminisce about the extraordinary experience they had. Pam Jackson and Jane Wales, the producer’s assistants who planned the incredibly complex filming schedules describe what was happening behind the scenes, and their attempts to keep their presenter looking presentable even while scrambling through wild jungle. Producer: Deborah Dudgeon Series Producer: David Prest THE REUNION is a Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.

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  9. Sue MacGregor reunites five people from the ground-breaking 80s TV comedy The Young Ones.

    In the early 1980s, the most popular TV comedies were cosy sitcoms like To The Manor Born and Last of the Summer Wine. Live stand-up comedy was largely confined to working men’s clubs and seaside resorts. Mother-in-law and Irish gags were still a staple. But, in the backroom of a Soho strip club, an underground venue called The Comic Strip emerged. The non-sexist, anti-racist but violent and bolshy acts drew a fashionable crowd. Jack Nicholson and Dustin Hoffman were among the stars in the audience. TV producers drew from the performers they saw there for the casting of The Young Ones. The bunch of loud-mouthed scruff bags thrown together as housemates in grotty, tumbledown digs, really broke the mould. When The Young Ones was first aired in November 1982, ratings were pitiful. But before long, the show, with its wild slapstick and surreal twists, soon won a dedicated following. Within six months, a second series was on TV and the team had a BAFTA award for their mantelpiece. Like the British classic Fawlty Towers, the team decided that The Young Ones should only run for 12 episodes. By then, everyone involved had made their name and alternative comedy became the TV phenomenon of the decade. Sue MacGregor is joined by original Young One Nigel Planer who played depressed musician Neil; Chris Ryan who played Mike "The Cool Person"; Alexei Sayle who played members of the Balowski family; Lise Mayer who co-wrote the series with Ben Elton and her then partner actor Rik Mayall; and Stephen Frost who played a number of roles across both series. Producer: Karen Pirie Series Producer: David Prest A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

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  10. Sue MacGregor reunites the team that brought reality TV show Big Brother to UK screens

    In this week’s Reunion, Sue MacGregor and guests revisit the show that transformed British television for either good or bad, depending on your point of view, when it first hit our screens in July of 2000. Big Brother placed participants under 24-hr camera and microphone scrutiny in a "house" where they competed to avoid nomination by housemates, then eviction by public vote. Such was the media interest in this first series, the news that Nasty Nick Bateman had been thrown out featured on the front page of almost every national newspaper in the UK. By the time Series 5 arrived, the then Chancellor Gordon Brown found himself answering questions about racism in an episode of Big Brother, during a visit to India. Throughout the eight weeks spent inside the house, contestants were not permitted to make any contact with the outside world. There were few home comforts, limitations on food, and weekly tasks and competitions. In the Diary Room, housemates were expected to privately convey their true thoughts and feelings before revealing their nominees for eviction. The show generated a torrent of media analysis and opinion on both the psychological effects on contestants and what society now considered "entertainment". Joining Sue MacGregor to recall the first series of Big Brother are: Sir Peter Bazalgette who developed and produced the UK format of Big Brother and was described by critic Victor Lewis Smith as having "done more to debase television over the past decade than anyone else"; Tim Gardam, then Channel Four’s Director of Programmes who commissioned Big Brother; and some of those whose lives were changed after taking part in the first series in 2000. Producer: Peter Curran A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.

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