djinna / collective / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (536)

  1. Rethinking Technological Positivism with Cory Doctorow - CoRecursive Podcast

    Self-driving cars or armed autonomous military robots may make use of the same technologies. In a certain sense, we as software developers are helping to build and shape the future. What does the future look like and are we helping build the right one? Is technology a force for liberty or oppression.

    Cory Doctorow is one of my favorite authors and also a public intellectual with a keen insight into the dangers we face a society. In this interview, I ask him how to avoid ending up in a techno-totalitarian society. We also talk about Turing, DRM, data mining and monopolies.

    https://corecursive.com/33-cory-doctorow-digital-rights/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 36 Seconds That Changed Everything – How the iPhone Learned to Talk

    From the moment Steve Jobs announced it in 2007, anticipation for the first iPhone was off the charts. And when it shipped? Customers lined up around their local Apple stores; some arriving days before the phones could be bought.

    But the hype and hysteria left one group of cell phone users out – if you had a disability, the new hotness was just a cold, unresponsive rectangle of plastic and glass.

    This is the story of how that changed in June of 2009, and what it has meant to people who are blind, have a hearing disability, or experience motor delays.

    This is the story of iPhone accessibility.

    http://www.36seconds.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Computers at Home

    In the 1980s, ‘micro computers’ invaded the home. In this episode, Hannah Fry discovers how the computer was transported from the office and the classroom right into our living room.

    From eccentric electronics genius Clive Sinclair and his ZX80, to smart-suited businessman Alan Sugar and the Amstrad PC, she charts the 80s computer boom - a time when the UK had more computers per head of population than anywhere else in the world.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bnq0y

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. #32: ‘Hula Hoops not Bicycles’: Genevieve Bell talks Anthropology, Technology & Building the Future

    "We were bringing the voices of people that didn’t get inside the building, inside the building and making them count. And I took that as an incredible responsibility, that you should give those voices weight and dignity and power."

    We are excited to announce that this is the FIRST EPISODE OF OUR STS SERIES! The goal of the STS (science and technology studies, or science, technology and society - your pick!) Series is to explore the ways that humans, science and technology interact. While we have released some STS episodes in 2018, we still had some left in the bag from the 4S Conference PLUS many new ones as well. Let’s go!

    Genevieve Bell, Director of the Autonomy, Agency and Assurance (also known as the 3A) Insitute and Florence McKenzie Chair (which promotes the inclusive use of technology in society) at the Australian National University, Vice President and Senior Fellow at Intel Corporation, and ABC’s 2017 Boyer Lecturer, talks to our own Jodie-Lee Trembath about building the future and a question at the heart of STS inquiry: "what is important to humans and how we can make sense of that to unpack the world that we live in?". They begin by reflecting on the Acknowledgement of Country that we begin every podcast episode with and the power that comes from realising our positions, then discuss being an anthropologist in Silicon Valley, learning how to ‘translate’ anthropology to different audiences, predicting the world in 10 years time and the importance of rituals (especially when finishing your PhD!).

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/thefamiliarstrange/32-hula-hoops-not-bicycles-genevieve-bell
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 26 May 2019 10:17:47 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Brendan Dawes ‘Working at the intersection of People, Objects & Technology.’ - This is HCD

    We’re at Pixel Pioneers in Belfast today.

    A conference that has been going for two years.

    It was a fantastic day.

    https://www.thisishcd.com/interaction-design/brendan-dawes-working-at-the-intersection-of-people-objects-technology/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Katie Bouman: How to take a picture of a black hole | TED Talk

    At the heart of the Milky Way, there’s a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close — even light. We can’t see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth — until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/katie_bouman_what_does_a_black_hole_look_like

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Thriving in a Digital World: My Conversation with Stratechery’s Ben Thompson [The Knowledge Project Ep. #40]

    Stratechery’s Ben Thompson visits The Knowledge Project and shares his thoughts on business in the digital age, running a one-man publishing company, and how technology will transform our future

    https://fs.blog/ben-thompson/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Ep 4 Laura Kalbag – The Elastic Brand

    In this episode Laura and Liz discuss

    Ethical brand designToxic technology and dark patterns

    The need for tech industry diversity.

    Accessibility and inclusivity.

    How we can be more ethical as designers.

    How we need to make sure we are working with ethical companies

    http://theelasticbrand.com/episode/ep-4-laura-kalbag/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. What if women built the internet?

    All the things we love on the internet — from websites that give us information to services that connect us — are made stronger when their creators come with different points of view. With this in mind, we asked ourselves and our guests: “What would the internet look like if it was built by mostly women?”

    Witchsy founders Kate Dwyer and Penelope Gazin start us off with a story about the stunt they had to pull to get their site launched — and counter the sexist attitudes they fought against along the way. Brenda Darden Wilkerson recalls her life in tech in the 80s and 90s, and shares her experience leading AnitaB.org, an organization striving to get more women hired in tech. Coraline Ada Ehmke created the Contributor Covenant, a voluntary code of conduct being increasingly adopted by the open source community. She explains why she felt it necessary, and how it’s been received; and Mighty Networks CEO Gina Bianchini rolls her eyes at being called a “lady CEO,” and tells us why diversifying the boardroom is great for business and innovation.

    https://irlpodcast.org/season4/episode7/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Alex Wright: Glut: Mastering Information Though the Ages - The Long Now

    A Series of Information Explosions

    As usual, microbes led the way.

    Bacteria have swarmed in intense networks for 3.5 billion years.

    Then a hierarchical form emerged with the first nucleated cells that were made up of an enclosed society of formerly independent organisms.

    That’s the pattern for the evolution of information, Alex Wright said.

    Networks coalesce into hierarchies, which then form a new level of networks, which coalesce again, and so on.

    Thus an unending series of information explosions is finessed.

    In humans, classification schemes emerged everywhere, defining how things are connected in larger contexts.

    Researchers into “folk taxonomies” have found that all cultures universally describe things they care about in hierarchical layers, and those hierarchies are usually five layers deep.

    Family tree hierarchies were accorded to the gods, who were human-like personalities but also represented various natural forces.

    Starting 30,000 years ago the “ice age information explosion” brought the transition to collaborative big game hunting, cave paintings, and elaborate decorative jewelry that carried status information.

    It was the beginning of information’s “release from social proximity.”

    5,000 years ago in Sumer, accountants began the process toward writing, beginning with numbers, then labels and lists, which enabled bureaucracy.

    Scribes were just below kings in prestige.

    Finally came written narratives such as Gilgamesh.

    The move from oral culture to literate culture is profound.

    Oral is additive, aggregative, participatory, and situational, where literate is subordinate, analytic, objective, and abstract.

    (One phenomenon of current Net culture is re-emergence of oral forms in email, twittering, YouTube, etc.)

    Wright honored the sequence of information-ordering visionaries who brought us to our present state.

    In 1883 Charles Cutter devised a classification scheme that led in part to the Library of Congress system and devised an apparatus of keyboard and wires that would fetch the desired book.

    H.G. Wells proposed a “world brain” of data and imagined that it would one day wake up.

    Teilhard de Chardin anticipated an “etherization of human consciousness” into a global noosphere.

    The greatest unknown revolutionary was the Belgian Paul Otlet.

    In 1895 he set about freeing the information in books from their bindings.

    He built a universal decimal classification and then figured out how that organized data could be explored, via “links” and a “web.”

    In 1910 Otlet created a “radiated library” called the Mundameum in Brussels that managed search queries in a massive way until the Nazis destroyed the service.

    Alex Wright showed an astonishing video of how Otlet’s distributed telephone-plus-screen system worked.

    Wright concluded with the contributions of Vannevar Bush (”associative trails” in his Memex system), Eugene Garfield’s Science Citation Index, the predecessor of page ranking.

    Doug Engelbart’s working hypertext system in the “mother of all demos.”

    And Ted Nelson who helped inspire Engelbart and Berners-Lee and who Wright considers “directly responsible for the generation of the World Wide Web.”

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02007/aug/17/glut-mastering-information-though-the-ages/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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