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djextracrispy / extracrispy

There are five people in djextracrispy’s collective.

Huffduffed (31)

  1. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  2. Jam Session: What Improvisation Can Teach Us About Design

    Have you ever had a spontaneous creative triumph, perfectly in sync with your team?

    A passionate believer in improvisation as a design skill, Hannah’s session will talk about the importance of this technique in her own design process and what lessons can be borrowed from improvised music.

    From the jazz masters to the humble basement band practice, musical concepts such as timing, structure, rolls and expression have many lessons for designers creating an off-the-cuff interface.

    Hannah will explore how the methods of music translate for a design/development team, as well as sharing personal stories and techniques for those times when you need a bit of a jam session.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/hannah-donovan

    Originally from Canada’s icy north, Hannah Donovan is creative director at Last.fm, where she’s worked for the last four years. Before moving to London, she designed websites for Canada’s largest youth-focused agency, working on brands such as Hershey, Heineken and Bic. Hannah also plays the cello with an orchestra and draws monsters.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  3. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  4. Boil, Simmer, Reduce

    The actual process of design, the path you take on the way to creating something, is in many ways a “meta object” that can be applied to any design problem.

    Ever since his first experiences with the humble ZX81 back in the early eighties, Brendan has continued to explore the interplay of people, code, design and art both in his role leading the team at mN and on brendandawes.com, a personal space where he publishes random thoughts, toys and projects created from an eclectic mix of digital and analog objects.

    In this session Brendan talks through his three step process: boil—filling your head with many ideas and possibilties, simmer—taking time to consider, and finally reduce—removing things till there’s nothing left to take away.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/brendan-dawes

    Brendan Dawes is Creative Director for magneticNorth, a digital design company based in Manchester, UK. Over the years he’s helped realise projects for a wide range of brands including Sony Records, Diesel, BBC, Fox Kids, Channel 4, Disney, Benetton, Kellogg’s, The Tate and Coca-Cola.In 2009 he was listed among the top twenty web designers in the world by .net magazine and was featured in the “Design Icon” series in Computer Arts.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  5. Textile Orchestra

    The new disc For the Boss (Beta-Lactam Ring Records) from the Textile Orchestra is almost a musical equivalent of Katamari: the ball starts rolling, picking up chunks of random textures, sounds, stumbling around an arena of collected percussion, mangled musique concrète, turntables, squawks, David Attenborough blurts, who knows what else, and finally turns into a complete shitstorm monster of thinly-spliced chaos hitting the windshield like a million metallic bugs. This lengthy MP3 was recorded in Paris in 2004 and features Alexandre Bellenger (turntables), Arnaud Rivière (mixing board/electrophone), Dan Warburton (violin) and Aaron Moore (turntables). Moore is also of legendary soundshapers Volcano the Bear, and appears as a guest on Daniel Blumin’s WFMU program this Sunday night at midnight. Thanks to Aaron and Chris from BLR.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  6. Simple as Pi

    Episode two of Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Most people’s first slice of Pi is at school where it is generally made palatable as either 3.14 or the fraction 3 1/7. The memory of this number may be fuzzy for those propelled through their Maths GCSE by the power of Casio (where Pi was reduced to a button on the bottom row of the calculator), but the likelihood is they still recall that romanticised notion of a number whose decimal places randomly go on forever. At its simplest, Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. At its most complex, it is an irrational number that cannot be expressed as the ratio of two whole numbers and has an apparently random decimal string of infinite length.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  7. 6 Degrees of Separation

    Episode three of A Further Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Six is often treated as 2x3, but has many characteristics of its own. Six is also the "pivot" of its divisors (1 2 3=6=1x2x3) and also the centre of the first five even numbers: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10. Six seems to have a pivoting action both mathematically and socially. How is it that everyone in the world can be linked through just six social ties? As Simon discovers, the concept of “six degrees of separation” emerged from a huge postal experiment conducted by the social psychologist Stanley Milgram in 1967. Milgram asked volunteers to send a package by mail to one of a hundred people chosen at random. But they could only send mail to people they knew on first name terms.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  8. A Life Well Wasted: Why Game?

    Robert Ashley wonders why he spends his free time playing videogames, asks random people on the street about it, talks to a researcher whose work attempts to harness the brain power wasted on gaming, gets to know an eccentric, forward-thinking game designer who lives sustainably with his family of four on $14,000 a year, and gets a first-hand account of what it’s like to work on terrible games (and what it’s like to get terrible reviews) from an anonymous game developer.

    http://alifewellwasted.com/2009/04/29/episode-3-why-game/

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  9. Leonard Mlodinow on randomness and his book The Drunkard’s Walk

    Leonard Mlodinow, of the California Institute of Technology is the author of The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives. His lecture on the subject of randomness was presented by the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario on May 6th, 2009.

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

  10. Math Can Predict Insurgent Attacks, Physicist Says

    The atrocities of war often seem random.

    But when it comes to insurgent attacks in Afghanistan or Iraq, that’s not exactly the case, says Neil Johnson, a physicist at the University of Miami. Johnson tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about the equation his team has developed that predicts when such attacks will happen.

    "We found … that there was a kind of rhyme and reason behind the numbers," he says. "They weren’t just accelerating, they were accelerating in a particular way."

    Not So Random

    Johnson and his research team gathered publicly available data on military fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq. On a graph, the numbers created a distinct, upward curve.

    He says it wasn’t just a coincidence; those numbers follow a specific mathematical pattern. In this case, the pattern translates into an equation you can punch into a handheld calculator, says Johnson.

    It works like this: Say two attacks happen in the same general area. Take the time interval between those two incidents, plug it into the equation and it gives an estimate of how many days until the next attack.

    "That immediately gives you a time interval between the first two attacks," explain Johnson, "You take that, put it into the equation and it gives you an estimate."

    It’s only an estimate, Johnson admits, but it’s better than not knowing anything at all.

    An Insurgent Learning Curve

    The equation is based on the learning curve of an insurgent group when it comes to executing attacks.

    Think of it this way: A group of people, for example, medical students, are trying to complete a task, like surgery. The medical students keep practicing doing surgery, and over a period of time, they become better at completing an operation successfully.

    Only in this case, it’s insurgent groups practicing bombings.

    "They got some kind of task, which is to carry out among other things, fatal attacks on coalition military," he says. "And as they do it, they’re getting better but they’re getting better in a specific type of mathematical way."

    The Department of Defense is "actively interested" in the equation, which has just been published in the journal Science, Johnson says. He’s also working on an even bigger study, funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, to estimate military and civilian causalities more accurately.

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    Tagged with npr

    —Huffduffed by djextracrispy

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