The Taking Of Pelham One-Two-Three | Soundtrack Suite (David Shire)

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  1. #21 – Jaws – Settling the Score

    You’re not gonna need a bigger podcast – this one’s about John Williams’ 1975 score for Jaws, the #6 score on the AFI’s list! How did Williams change Spielberg’s conception of his own movie? In a score often remembered for its simplicity, how many different complex flavors does he actually bring? And, what one weird trick can let you know whether a shark is coming to eat you?

    http://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/21-jaws/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. #38 – The Princess Bride – Settling the Score

    So you want us to talk about Mark Knopfler’s score for the 1987 fairy tale adventure The Princess Bride? As you wish. How is this score sensitive to the twists and turns of the dire straits in which our heroes find themselves? Can a movie have a good score without having good music? And, when Rob Reiner said no one else could have scored the movie, did he mean it? (Anybody want a peanut?)

    https://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/podcast-player/315/38-the-princess-bride.mp3Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 1:06:13Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Google Play | Spotify

    https://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/38-the-princess-bride/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. #40 – Titanic – Settling the Score

    This time, Jon and Andy go on and on about James Horner’s score for the 1997 epic disaster romance Titanic. What pop artist did director James Cameron originally want to score the movie? What powerful chord change is a keystone of both the score and the movie’s famous song? And, just how many famous paintings have actually been on the bottom of the ocean this whole time?

    https://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/40-titanic/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. #23 – Psycho – Settling the Score

    Find out how much praise we shower on the AFI’s #4 – Bernard Herrmann’s score for 1960’s Psycho! How did arguably the most famous of all film score cues result from ignoring Hitchcock’s specific instructions? What did Herrmann see in this film beyond even what Hitchcock perhaps intended? And, how would you spell the Psycho noise? Plus, a special appearance by Jon’s wife Becky for some insight into violin techniques.

    http://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/23-psycho/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Making Of ‘King Kong’: Screams, Score And More : NPR

    There are many things that make the 1933 movie King Kong great — the special effects, the image of the giant ape climbing the Empire State Building, Fay Wray’s screams — and the score, composed by Max Steiner. Film historian Rudy Behlmer tells the story of the movie’s score and special effects.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/08/04/138953014/the-making-of-king-kong-screams-score-and-more?ft=1&f=13

    —Huffduffed by casey

  6. #28 – AFI Wrap-Up – Settling the Score

    After finishing their task of discussing and reordering the American Film Institute’s Top 25 Scores, Jon and Andy kick back and take stock of what they’ve done. What did they learn? What did they get wrong? How in the world did Andy expect Jon to recognize the clips he chose for his quiz? And, what score will be up next?

    https://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/28-afi-wrap-up/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Soundcheck - Wynton Marsalis

    Wynton Marsalis is no stranger to ambitious concepts. His latest major work presents a particularly bold task: getting orchestras to swing. He joins us to discuss his “Swing Symphony,” which gets its US premiere at the New York Philharmonic this month, and to talk about the melding of classical and jazz idioms.

    Plus, we ask him about his score to the silent film Louis, the new season at Jazz at Lincoln Center – and the trip to Cuba he is leading in October.

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    Tagged with jazz

    —Huffduffed by BryanDavis