davidleemartins / David Martins

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Huffduffed (171)

  1. Sean Carroll’s Mindscape 58 - Seth MacFarlane on Using Science Fiction to Explore Humanity

    58 | Seth MacFarlane on Using Science Fiction to Explore Humanity August 5, 2019 | Film/TV, Humanity, Literature

    https://www.preposterousuniverse.com/podcast/2019/08/05/58-seth-macfarlane-on-using-science-fiction-to-explore-humanity/?utm_source=pocket_mylist

    Fiction shines a light on the human condition by putting people into imaginary situations and envisioning what might happen. Science fiction expands this technique by considering situations in the future, with advanced technology, or with utterly different social contexts. Seth MacFarlane’s show The Orville is good old-fashioned space opera, but it’s also a laboratory for exploring the intricacies of human behavior. There are interpersonal conflicts, sexual politics, alien perspectives, and grappling with the implications of technology. I talk with Seth about all these issues, and maybe a little bit about whether it’s a good idea to block people on Twitter.

    —Huffduffed by davidleemartins

  2. C86 Show - Indie Pop - The Sundays special with Patrick Hannan

    Patrick Hannan in conversation with David Eastaugh - talking about life in The Sundays, Arnold, the audience & much much more

    Wheeler had played gigs with Cruel Shoes, an early incarnation of the band Jim Jiminee. The duo soon augmented the band with bassist Paul Brindley and drummer Patrick Hannan.

    The Sundays secured a recording contract with Rough Trade Records. Their debut single was "Can’t Be Sure". Their first album, Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, was released in 1990, along with their next single "Here’s Where the Story Ends". The album was a UK Top 5 hit.

    —Huffduffed by davidleemartins

  3. Around the World in 80s Movies Podcast - Electric Dreams (1984) | Steve Barron

    A San Francisco-based architect named Miles Harding buys a new computer to help him stay organized and on schedule, as well as to assist in the design of a brick that will hold a building together through an earthquake. Realizing that it has the potential to streamline everything in his life, Miles uses it to control everything in his apartment, providing a security system, making his coffee, and turning on and off his lights. Miles wants to give it more power, tapping it into a major information source to download as much as it can take. Unfortunately, when the computer overheats, Miles pours champagne into the computer’s circuits, causing it to malfunction in a strange way. It begins to think on its own, without directive – a self-aware being that shows an interest in music, humanity, and what it is like to feel love.

    Miles’s new upstairs neighbor is a beautiful concert cellist named Madeline Robistat. One day while practicing a concert piece on the cello, Madeline hears music from downstairs accompanying her. Madeline assumes this musician must be Miles, making her want to get to know him better. Miles also develops a crush on Madeline, but he’s so romantically inexperienced, he turns to his sentient computer to help out. However, the computer learns about love and then also begins to fall for her. This kicks off a battle of wills, as the device meant to organize Miles’s life is set to destroy it for getting in the way of its desire to achieve love.

    Starring Lenny von Dohlen and Virginia Madsen. Directed by Steve Barron.

    —Huffduffed by davidleemartins

  4. Clockwise #372: Comparing Apples to Intels

    November 11th, 2020 · 29 minutes

    The tasks we still do analog instead of digital, the lack of touch interfaces on Apple’s new Macs, is this the end of speeds and feeds, and whether we can live with just two ports on our computers.

    Guest Starring: Carolina Milanesi and Rosemary Orchard

    —Huffduffed by davidleemartins

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