damndirtypandas / tags / science fiction

Tagged with “science fiction” (10)

  1. Make It So: Learning From SciFi Interfaces by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel

    Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/nathanshedroff/

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, CA. This program melds the unique principles that design offers business strategy with a vision of the future of business as sustainable, meaningful, and truly innovative — as well as profitable.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/chrisnoessel/

    Chris Noessel is an interaction designer and self-described “nomothete” (ask him directly about that one.) In his day job as a consultant with Cooper, he designs products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and software.

    —Huffduffed by damndirtypandas

  2. G’Day World - Interview with Vernor Vinge

    Today I had the fortune to chat with another living legend - Vernor Vinge (pronounced “vin-jee” as in, he explained off air, “stingy”). While VV may not have the public profile of a William Gibson or Neal Stephenson, in geek circles no SF author carries more respect. Why is it so?

    His latest novel, RAINBOWS END, is a masterpiece of near-future Sci-Fi which explores the world circa 2025. Marc Andreessen called it “the clearest and most plausible extrapolation of modern technology trends forward to the year 2025 that you can imagine.”

    http://gdayworld.thepodcastnetwork.com/2007/07/31/gday-world-271-vernor-vinge-sf-author-extraordinaire/

    —Huffduffed by damndirtypandas

  3. KQED’s Forum: Margaret Atwood

    In Margaret Atwood’s new novel, a natural disaster has altered the earth and wiped out most human life. Two women survive, and "The Year of the Flood" is their story. We speak with the author about her career, the new book and what she thinks the future holds for our fragile planet.

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  4. Starfish - Peter Watts

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  5. All the Things You Are - Mike Resnick

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  6. Now n, Now - n - Robert Silverberg

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  7. Tom Flynn - Science Fiction and Atheism

    Tom Flynn is the Editor of Free Inquiry magazine. A journalist, novelist, entertainer, and folklorist, Flynn is the author of numerous articles for Free Inquiry, many addressing church-state issues, as well as the best-selling The Trouble With Christmas, about which he has made hundreds of radio and TV appearances in his role as the curmudgeonly âanti-Claus.â He is also the author of the critically acclaimed anti-religious black comedy science fiction novels, Galactic Rapture and Nothing Sacred. His latest work, The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief, is a comprehensive reference work on the history, beliefs, and thinking of Americaâs fastest growing minority: those who live without religion. In this interview with D.J. Grothe, Tom Flynn discusses the trouble he has with Christmas. He also explores the relationship of atheism and skepticism with science fiction. He talks about the connection that many of the leading figures in science fiction have had with the Center for Inquiry over the years. He surveys influential atheist and humanistic writers in science fiction including H.G. Wells, Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov, Douglas Adams, Phillip Pullman, and Kurt Vonnegut, among many others. He discusses the secular humanism in Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek franchise, and an interesting connection an episode had with Scientology. He details Orson Scott Card’s relationship with secular humanism. He talks about the influence of Robert Heinlein’s earlier works on the development of his own religious skepticism. He discusses the similarities of Scientology and Mormonism with science fiction. He examines the intersection of sci fi and religious satire, as in the works of James Morrow and Bo Fowler. And he explains his own foray into science fiction, with his critically acclaimed books Galactic Rapture and Nothing Sacred.

    —Huffduffed by damndirtypandas

  8. Confessions of a Crap Artist

    The life and very strange times of Philip K. Dick who suggested his own epitaph should be:

    "Wrote science fiction, took drugs, found God. Big deal."

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  9. To The Best Of Our Knowledge - The Future of Science Fiction

    Space, the final frontier. But is science fiction the final frontier when it comes to being a literature of ideas? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll wax philosophical about science fiction with two of the genre’s greatest writers — George R.R. Martin and Ursula K. Le Guin. And we’ll explore H.P. Lovecraft’s literary philosophy of "Cosmicism."

    http://wpr.org/book/081123a.cfm

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  10. The Fork: Science Fiction versus Mundane Culture

    Neal Stephenson delivers a talk on Science Fiction as a Genre at Gresham College. Four professors discuss the origins of science fiction, its overlap with other genres and its developments over more than a century.

    —Huffduffed by damndirtypandas