dConstruct / tags / interface

Tagged with “interface” (5)

  1. Gorgeous Catastrophic

    Through the book Make it So (Rosenfeld Media, 2012) and scifiinterfaces.com, Chris has spent years meticulously tracing the lines of influence between designs in sci-fi and the real world. And yes, there are clearly influences. But that does not mean that design in the real world should take its marching orders from sci-fi. Sure, a lot of it is jaw-droppingly beautiful. But some of those same, lovely designs—if implemented—would quickly result in the “usability problems” of severed limbs, munitions craters, mangled bodies, and even the plain old end of the world. Join Chris as he deconstructs enough examples to make us deeply, deeply wary of fetishizing them, and approach sci-fi interfaces with a critical (and still intact) eye.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. dConstruct 2015: Chris Noessel

    This one gets super-nerdy. Jeremy and Chris geek out about interfaces in science fiction films, from Logan’s Run to Iron Man, applying the principle of apologetics along the way. To kick off, Chris humours Jeremy’s crackpot theory about the Star Wars universe, and to wrap up, Chris unveils a very special event taking place the evening before dConstruct.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Infinite Inputs

    In the beginning… there was the keyboard and the mouse. Today, the kinds of input our computing devices support keeps growing: touch, voice, device motion, and much more. Each additional input type offers new possibilities for interaction that requires our interface designs to adapt.

    When will this deluge of new input types end so don’t have to keep re-designing our software? It won’t. Not until everything is input.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/luke/

    Luke Wroblewski is the Zelig of the web world. Think of all the major turning points in the history of the web and I bet you’ll find that Luke was involved in some way.

    It all started back with his stint at NCSA, birthplace of the world-changing Mosaic web browser. Since then Luke has gone to work with all manner of companies, large (like Yahoo) and small (like Bagcheck). His latest startup is Polar, the mobile app that’s like hot-or-not for the world, getting big value from micro interactions.

    Along the way, Luke has made the web a better place thanks to his meticulously-researched books. He wrote the book on web form design. He wrote the book on mobile first design. Heck, he even coined the term “mobile first” …which means he‘s mobile first first.

    There‘s no shortage of people in Silicon Valley with opinions about technology, but what sets Luke apart is his razor-sharp focus on data. So whatever it is he has to say at dConstruct, you can be sure that it’s backed up with facts.

    Luke is also a blogging machine. You can try to keep up with the firehose at lukew.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    In this presentation, Geoloqi co-founder Amber Case will take you on a journey through the history of calm technology, wearable computing, and how developers and designers can make apps “ambient” and inspire delight instead of constant interaction.

    This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing starting from the 1970’s-2010’s and how mobile interfaces should take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/amber/

    Amber Case is a researcher exploring the field of cyborg anthropology. How cool is that‽

    Amber is also the director of the Esri R&D Center in lovely Portland, Oregon. Her work there started when Esri acquired Geoloqi, her startup that provided location functionality for mobile apps.

    Amber is a captivating presence when she’s geeking out about the interaction between humans and technology, hence her barnstorming appearances at TED and South by Southwest.

    Right now, her work involves non-visual augmented reality, the future of location, and reducing the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect.

    Her home on the web is caseorganic.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. Make It So: Learning From SciFi Interfaces by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel

    Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/nathanshedroff/

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, CA. This program melds the unique principles that design offers business strategy with a vision of the future of business as sustainable, meaningful, and truly innovative — as well as profitable.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/chrisnoessel/

    Chris Noessel is an interaction designer and self-described “nomothete” (ask him directly about that one.) In his day job as a consultant with Cooper, he designs products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and software.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct