dConstruct / tags / hacking

Tagged with “hacking” (3)

  1. Designing the Future…and Building It…with Science Fiction!

    The future is not an accident. The future doesn’t just happen. The future is built everyday by the actions of people. But before you can build the future you have to imagine it. Join internationally renowned futurist Brian David Johnson to explore how we can design our futures and then go about building them. Johnson will share his framework and process as well as a recent example: Open source 3D printable Robots! Born in science fiction a decade ago and now walking, talking and joking their way into the hearts, minds and imagination of kids and grownups all over the world.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/brian-david-johnson

    The future is Brian David Johnson’s business. As a futurist he develops an actionable 10-15 year vision for the future of technology and what it will feel like to live in the future. His work is called “futurecasting”—using ethnographic field studies, technology research, trend data, and even science fiction to provide a pragmatic vision of consumers and computing. Johnson works with governments, militaries, trade organizations, start-ups and multinational corporations to help them envision their future. He was appointed first futurist ever at the Intel Corporation in 2009.

    Johnson speaks and writes extensively about future technologies in articles (The Wall Street Journal, Slate, IEEE Computer, Successful Farming) and both science fiction and fact books (21st Century Robot, Vintage Tomorrows, Science Fiction Prototyping, and Fake Plastic Love). Johnson lectures around the world and teaches as a professor at The University of Washington and The California College of the Arts MBA program. He appears regularly on Bloomberg TV, PBS, FOX News, and the Discovery Channel and has been featured in Scientific American, The Technology Review, Forbes, INC, and Popular Science. He has directed two feature films and is an illustrator and commissioned painter.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. The Heroes and Anti-heroes of the Information Age

    In the information age, data is the new currency and access to it is power. With battle cries such as “Information wants to be free”, “Hack the planet” and “we are legion” – Hackers have risen to infamy. But why are they so influential and how are they shaping the world to come?

    Hackers, as manipulators of technology and information, are playing a key role in the future of man & machines evolution. As change agents, they continuously push the boundaries of technology, exploring new frontiers such hacking the human body and the brain, turning science fiction inspirations into a reality. Hackers are people who can communicate with machines – and the world needs such individuals to act as mediators, synthesizers and modems - between data, humanity and technology.

    But Hackers can also be villains, creating dangerous technologies. So, with great power comes great responsibility, and the transformative power of hacking can become a positive influence in years to come, but only if we learn to embrace and harness it.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/keren/

    Remember the film Hackers with Johnny Lee Miller and Angelina Jolie? Well, it’s thanks to that movie that Keren Elazari decided to dive into the world of cyberspace.

    Now she is a security expert with extensive experience of large scale commercial and national cyber security issues. Born and raised in Tel Aviv, she now divides her time between Tel Aviv University and the Singularity University in California.

    Through it all she has maintained her love for the near-future worlds of sci-fi and cyberpunk.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Great; things are connected, but what will they actually talk about?

    We take it for granted that smart and connected products will bring a benefit to our lives, but connecting is only the first step.

    To get away from the repetitive visions of the connected, efficient and sterile home of the future and to look for new and more human scenarios, we need to shift from designing internets to designing relationships of things.

    People have bias, stereotypes and cultural beliefs that they pass into the products that they design. Companies have business goals that they have to meet and rivalries with other competitors. If we take the point of view of a product in this scenario, how will its life change?

    New relationships and conversations will emerge between products with different goals or references and at the same time with people that will live with them.

    If we stop only drawing dotted lines between products, but we actually start looking at what relationship could emerge on that line, we will find ourselves exploring a new way of understating services and interactions with connected products.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/simone/

    Simone Rebaudengo hails from Turin, lived in Sweden for a while, and now spends most of his time in Munich where he works as an interaction designer with Frog Design.

    His fascination with the way that people and objects interact with each has led to some amazing work. Not content with exploring the Internet Of Things, he‘s experimenting with the Internet Of Things With Feelings. He paints an all-too-believable picture of how network-enabled objects might behave when they know how other objects on the network are being used. I, for one, welcome our neurotic robotic overlords.

    We invited Simone to come along and speak at our other conference, UX London, and it was a smash hit. I remember thinking, “Oh man, this is perfect for this year’s dConstruct!”

    You’re going to love him.

    You can see Simone’s work at simonerebaudengo.com and you should really check out his Tumblr blog, Designed Addictions.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct