Materialising and Dematerialising A Web of Data. (Or What We’ve Learned From Printing The Internet Out)

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  1. There’s a walrus in my fridge and it won’t shut up – Russell Davies – Next Berlin 2012

    Twittering plants? A plastic parrot informing you about traffic jams? In his keynote speech at NEXT Berlin 2012, Russell Davies humorously and cleverly illustrates his idea of what will be next: the network of things, which will irrevocably change the way we use technologies and the purposes we use it for. Davies’ post-digital world is a “making world” in which people use networked things to produce analog objects – personalised and on demand.

    Audio rip, original here: http://nextberlin.eu/2012/05/russell-davies-theres-a-walrus-in-my-fridge-and-it-wont-shut-up/

    —Huffduffed by zzot

  2. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Shift Run Stop, Episode Five: Russell Davies

    This week we are joined by Russell Davies (the author and organiser of the Interesting conferences) and discover that he was once in a band.

    We also hear from Karen (wife and nightly documenter of the infamous Sleep Talkin’ Man) and eat some festive snacks with Dave Green.

    http://shiftrunstop.co.uk/2009/12/10/episode-5-russell-davies/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. BBC Click: dConstruct: Living with the Network

    How computers and digital technology affect our lives around the world.

    Click investigates triumphs and pitfalls of the digital age at the dConstruct conference.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/digitalp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. On The Media: Transcript of “Panoramic View” (April 16, 2010)

    Writer Dave Eggers’ publishing house, McSweeney’s, recently released a one-off newspaper called Panorama. The 328-page paper was meant as a celebration of the print form and a demonstration of why newspapers are still uniquely relevant in the digital era. Brooke interviewed Dave live onstage in Washington DC, and asked him about the future of print.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  6. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Pocket Scale

    I punch in a keycode and enter the office. Three steps through the door I swipe my travelcard against an old wooden box, which starts spitting out a radio station based on forty million people’s answer to the question ‘What songs would a Joy Division fan like?’ The sexyfuture arrived yesterday, and it colonised my pockets.

    Even on the days you leave your phone at home, you carry enough hacked objects to unlock space and time, provided you find the right door. What should we be thinking about as we bring our products to life? What are we strapping to our keyrings? And what does all of this mean for a scale we’ve been familiar with for centuries?

    Matthew will empty his pockets live at dConstruct to find out, revealing the five things he’s carrying around with him in Brighton and why.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/matthew-sheret

    Writer and editor Matthew Sheret is Last.fm’s Data Griot, using everything from tweets to radio scripts to tell stories about Last.fm’s numbers.

    He has worked for the likes of Newspaper Club, 4iP, Thomson Reuters and Dentsu London and in 2008 co-founded We Are Words Pictures, an ad-hoc team of comic book creators who promote the work of up-and-coming creators.

    In his spare time he edits and publishes the anthology Paper Science and plays with Lego.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. Tethering the Hovercraft

    A careen through grassroots innovation, speculative design, supply chains and sexual healthcare provision, lashing down over-caffeinated flailing into the grit of socio-technical systems.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/georginavoss/

    Georgina Voss is a writer and researcher working on the interplay of technology, politics and culture. She sometimes writes for The Guardian, and she’s currently in residence at the lovely Lighthouse Arts right here in Brighton working on a design fiction project that asks “what could digital fabrication and hyper-local manufacturing offer to the provision of sexual healthcare?”

    She also holds a doctorate from Sussex Uni, so that’s Doctor Georgina Voss to you.

    George has a knack for exposing the networks underlying the most normal-seeming activities. Usually “logistics” isn’t a word that conjures up much excitement, but George can make you look at shipping containers in a whole new light.

    Oh, and she also hosts a great podcast called Gin and Innovation which has featured dConstruct alumni Dan Williams and James Bridle.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. Let’s See What We Can See (Everybody Online And Looking Good) by Mike Migurski and Ben Cerveny

    Piece by piece, the world is moving onto the web. "Things informationalize," as Stamen advisor Ben Cerveny puts it. How can we make sense of this new torrent of information emerging wide-eyed and blinking into the internet? Stamen’s Michal Migurski will show how information visualization is making it possible to comprehend a live, vast, and deep connected web of data, with a special focus on interactive and geographic work.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/mikemigurski/

    Stamen partner Michal Migurski leads the technical and research aspects of Stamen’s work, moving comfortably from active participation in Stamen’s design process, designing data, prototyping applications, to creating the dynamic projects that Stamen delivers to clients.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/bencerveny/

    Ben Cerveny is a strategic and conceptual advisor to Stamen, helping to articulate an approach toward creative visualization and to evaluate and develop potential partners and engagements relative to that vision.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  10. The Save Button Ruined Everything: Backing Up Our Digital Heritage

    Jason Scott is a man on a mission — save all the things.

    But what does “save” mean in the modern world, in the waterfall of personal and private data, and where do we even begin? Turning on the history-o-matic, Jason provides a backdrop to our attempts to “save”, what has been done, and what we can do. The talk will be fast-paced and loud, like a hard drive at the end of its life.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/scott/

    Jason Scott is a force of nature, tirelessly dedicated to preserving our digital history, from old-school game manuals to the latest social networking sites hell-bent on sucking our collective culture into “the cloud.”

    He is also a documentary film maker. He made BBS: The Documentary and Get Lamp, all about text adventure games.

    In the run-up to the destruction of Geocities, Jason set up Archive Team, a collective of volunteers who back up first and ask questions later. He now works for the Internet Archive, though he is at pains to point out that he does not speak for them.

    And yet, despite all his achievements, Jason will probably never be as well-known as his cat Sockington, who has over a million followers on Twitter.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct