Experience and the Emotion Commotion

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  2. Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

    Addiction or devotion? The complexity of our relationships between connected experiences, devices and people is increasing. Stanley Kubrick once said a film “should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what‛s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later”.

    Design ethnographer Kelly Goto presents underlying emotional indicators that reveal surprising attachments to brands, products, services and devices. Gain insight on designing user experiences that map to people‛s real needs and desires.

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  4. What’s Next? How Mobile is Changing Design by Brian Fling

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  5. Designing for emotion with Aarron Walter | by epicBagel

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    We also talk about what we can expect from Aarron’s exciting new book, ‘Designing for Emotion’. You can download an example of the design persona we discuss over at Aarron’s blog.

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    Resources:
    Mailchimp (http://www.mailchimp.com/)
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    Design Persona (http://aarronwalter.com/design-personas/)

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  6. Designing the Complete User Experience — dConstruct Audio Archive

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    http://archive.dconstruct.org/interaction+design/completeuserexperience

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    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

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  10. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

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    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

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