The Save Button Ruined Everything: Backing Up Our Digital Heritage

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  1. The Flower, the Field, and the Stack

    The interconnectedness of all things, or finding compassion in TCP/IP.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/hammersley/

    Ben Hammersley is the Prime Minister’s Ambassador to Tech City, but don’t hold that against him. He’s really quite a fascinating and charming gent and not at all a smarmy politician.

    When he’s not running marathons in the Sahara desert, Ben is a writer, broadcaster and journalist. He reports on the effects of the internet on society, foreign policy, business, and culture …not just on his blog either; his writing has appeared in proper dead-tree publications like The Times, The Guardian, and Wired UK (where he is Editor at Large).

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Where do old websites go to die? Jason Scott of Archive Team

    Our evening with Jason Scott last Wednesday was possibly the most entertaining archives talk ever in the world. No really. It really was. Jason is passionate and committed to his work and deadly serious about its importance but he is also seriously funny. Enjoy.

    http://recordkeepingroundtable.org/2011/06/25/where-do-old-websites-go-to-die-with-jason-scott-of-archive-team-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Cure for the Common Code

    Breaking down the barriers of web publishing by embracing the rise of code education.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/lukas/

    Jenn Lukas is a kick-ass web dev working with the mighty Happy Cog in Philadelphia. As well as speaking at conferences like JSConf, she writes for The Nerdary and has a regular column in .net magazine.

    Jenn is crazy about sports. She’s also crazy about cheese. Sometimes she combines the two.

    When she’s not crafting sites with the finest of web standards, Jenn teaches HTML and CSS for GirlDevelopIt. She is also a world authority on the bloody mary.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. The Archive Team

    Most of us think nothing of putting our lives in the cloud; photos in Flickr, videos on YouTube, most everything on Facebook. But what about when those services abruptly go away, taking all of our collective contributions with them? Well Jason Scott operates on the assumption that everything online will one day disappear. He explains to Bob why he and the Archive Team are dedicated to saving user-generated content for posterity.

    GUESTS: Jason Scott

    HOSTED BY: Bob Garfield

    http://www.onthemedia.org/2012/mar/23/archive-team/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Preserving the Creative Culture of the Web — Jason Scott, Kari Kraus, Nick Hasty

    For over 20 years the web has provided continuous deluge of cultural production. Digital artifacts such as websites, images, and videos have much to communicate about our social and cultural evolution, and yet their messages or moments can be fleeting or quickly lost. Both the accessibility and longevity of digital content are subject to a wide range of risks, from technological obsolescence to outright deletion by their creator or host. So what is being done to preserve these cultural objects for the long term? Approaching web content from a cultural and artistic perspective, this panel will convene leading writers, archivists, thinkers and technologists to discuss to the questions, challenges, and imperatives involving preserving the creative culture of the web. We’ll cover topics like "what is the long-term significance of a website, and why would it be worth preserving?", "should web sites and artifacts be treated like works of art or architecture?", and "how do we go about archiving digital content to ensure its accessibility and longevity?". Example initiatives to be discussed will be the Archive Team’s various projects (such as the Geocities torrent), the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, Internet Archeology, and the Rhizome ArtBase. This panel will be presented by Rhizome, an organization dedicated to the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology.

    http://www.archive.org/details/PreservingTheCreativeCultureOfTheWeb

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Adactio: Articles—All Our Yesterdays

    A presentation on digital preservation from the Build conference in Belfast in November 2011.

    Our communication methods have improved over time, from stone tablets, papyrus, and vellum through to the printing press and the World Wide Web. But while the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. This presentation will look at the scale of the problem and propose methods for tackling our collective data loss.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5176/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Imagined Futures

    “Those who don’t remember history are doomed to repeat it. Those who can’t imagine the future are doomed to fuck it up.”

    Lauren Beukes explores how fiction is a model our brains run to explore other lives and possibilities, overcome issue fatigue and fire our cultural imagination.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/beukes/

    Lauren Beukes is the author of Zoo City, which won the 2011 Arthur C. Clarke award. That’s because it’s bloody brilliant. Seriously, if you haven’t read it, grab a copy now.

    Her first novel, the excellent near-future dystopia Moxyland, was set in Cape Town, where Lauren lives with her husband and daughter. Her next book, The Shining Girls, will be set in Chicago and feature a time-travelling serial killer.

    As well as being a novelist, Lauren is a journalist and has collaborated on television and comic book projects.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct