What’s Next? How Mobile is Changing Design by Brian Fling

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  1. Make It So: Learning From SciFi Interfaces by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel

    Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/nathanshedroff/

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, CA. This program melds the unique principles that design offers business strategy with a vision of the future of business as sustainable, meaningful, and truly innovative — as well as profitable.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/chrisnoessel/

    Chris Noessel is an interaction designer and self-described “nomothete” (ask him directly about that one.) In his day job as a consultant with Cooper, he designs products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and software.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Experience and the Emotion Commotion

    The competitive environment for technology is changing, and its impact on experience design is deep: capabilities, features, and functions are no longer enough. Emotional engagement will distinguish successful consumer experiences of the future. Designing in this world requires we change the way we think about people and products. This presentation provides a brief overview of a counter-intuitive emotional design approach and its application to one of the hallmarks of the next phase in interaction design: Natural User Interface.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/augustdelosreyes/

    August de los Reyes is the Principal Director of User Experience for Microsoft Surface, a team dedicated to pioneering natural and intuitive ways to interact with technology.

    August is a member of the Advanced Studies Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design where he received an MDesS with Distinction for his research in product design and emotion. A guest design faculty member at the University of Washington, he was a 2007-2008 visiting associate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is working on his next book entitled The Poetics of Everyday Objects.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. Brighton SF with Brian Aldiss, Lauren Beukes, and Jeff Noon

    On the eve of dConstruct 2012, Jeremy Keith hosts an evening of readings and chat with three of the brightest stars of the science-fiction world at the Pavilion Theatre in Brighton.

    • Lauren Beukes, author of Moxyland, Zoo City, and The Shining Girls.
    • Jeff Noon, author of Vurt, Automated Alice, and Channel SK1N.
    • Brian Aldiss OBE, author of Hothouse, Nonstop, and the Helliconia trilogy.

    Event details: http://brightonsf.adactio.com/

    Transcript: http://adactio.com/articles/5740/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Infinite Inputs

    In the beginning… there was the keyboard and the mouse. Today, the kinds of input our computing devices support keeps growing: touch, voice, device motion, and much more. Each additional input type offers new possibilities for interaction that requires our interface designs to adapt.

    When will this deluge of new input types end so don’t have to keep re-designing our software? It won’t. Not until everything is input.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/luke/

    Luke Wroblewski is the Zelig of the web world. Think of all the major turning points in the history of the web and I bet you’ll find that Luke was involved in some way.

    It all started back with his stint at NCSA, birthplace of the world-changing Mosaic web browser. Since then Luke has gone to work with all manner of companies, large (like Yahoo) and small (like Bagcheck). His latest startup is Polar, the mobile app that’s like hot-or-not for the world, getting big value from micro interactions.

    Along the way, Luke has made the web a better place thanks to his meticulously-researched books. He wrote the book on web form design. He wrote the book on mobile first design. Heck, he even coined the term “mobile first” …which means he‘s mobile first first.

    There‘s no shortage of people in Silicon Valley with opinions about technology, but what sets Luke apart is his razor-sharp focus on data. So whatever it is he has to say at dConstruct, you can be sure that it’s backed up with facts.

    Luke is also a blogging machine. You can try to keep up with the firehose at lukew.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. LukeW | Mobile First

    LukeW Ideation Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design.

    http://www.lukew.com/presos/preso.asp?26

    —Huffduffed by Hilary

  9. Designing the Complete User Experience

    Design is hard. The Web is complicated. How do we make things for people when all we have are the most basic understanding of what they want? Join Jeffrey Veen as he takes a broad survey of the challenges designers face today, and how we’re all solving those problems with new perspectives on user research, interaction design, and information architecture.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  10. Adactio: Articles—Paranormal Interactivity

    A presentation on interaction design from An Event Apart 2010.

    Interaction is the secret sauce of the web. Understanding interaction is key to understanding the web as its own medium—it’s not print, it’s not television, and it’s certainly not the desktop.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5199/

    —Huffduffed by adactio