Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

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  1. Experience and the Emotion Commotion

    The competitive environment for technology is changing, and its impact on experience design is deep: capabilities, features, and functions are no longer enough. Emotional engagement will distinguish successful consumer experiences of the future. Designing in this world requires we change the way we think about people and products. This presentation provides a brief overview of a counter-intuitive emotional design approach and its application to one of the hallmarks of the next phase in interaction design: Natural User Interface.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/augustdelosreyes/

    August de los Reyes is the Principal Director of User Experience for Microsoft Surface, a team dedicated to pioneering natural and intuitive ways to interact with technology.

    August is a member of the Advanced Studies Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design where he received an MDesS with Distinction for his research in product design and emotion. A guest design faculty member at the University of Washington, he was a 2007-2008 visiting associate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is working on his next book entitled The Poetics of Everyday Objects.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. UX in the UK: Gerry Gaffney interviews Andy Budd | Information & Design

    My guest today has a finger in many pies. He’s a user experience designer, many people will be familiar with his gorilla, the iconic photograph that appears on the usability testing application Silverback, which runs on Mac computers.

    He’s managing director at Clearleft Limited, a user experience company based in Brighton, England. He organises the UX London Conference which is forthcoming shortly and the dConstruct Conference.

    Andy Budd, welcome to the User Experience podcast.

    http://www.infodesign.com.au/uxpod/uxuk

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. What is Web 2.0?

    User experience designer and upcoming author, Andy Budd, discussed how the web is moving from a document delivery system to an application platform. Andy attempted to define what Web 2.0 really means and looked at some of the technologies and applications making this transition possible.

    http://2005.dconstruct.org/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Designing for emotion with Aarron Walter | by epicBagel

    In this podcast, we speak with Aarron Walter, user experience design lead at MailChimp, about designing for emotion.

    Aarron talks about why and how MailChimp aimed not just for usable, but for a pleasurable user experience. We also discuss what’s fuelled the emergence of emotional design, risks with emotional design and why emotional design should be led by the UX team.

    We also talk about what we can expect from Aarron’s exciting new book, ‘Designing for Emotion’. You can download an example of the design persona we discuss over at Aarron’s blog.

    Guest:
    Aarron Walter, user experience designer (http://aarronwalter.com/)

    Resources:
    Mailchimp (http://www.mailchimp.com/)
    ‘Designing for Emotion’ (http://www.abookapart.com/products/designing-for-emotion)
    Design Persona (http://aarronwalter.com/design-personas/)

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  5. Brighton SF with Brian Aldiss, Lauren Beukes, and Jeff Noon

    On the eve of dConstruct 2012, Jeremy Keith hosts an evening of readings and chat with three of the brightest stars of the science-fiction world at the Pavilion Theatre in Brighton.

    • Lauren Beukes, author of Moxyland, Zoo City, and The Shining Girls.
    • Jeff Noon, author of Vurt, Automated Alice, and Channel SK1N.
    • Brian Aldiss OBE, author of Hothouse, Nonstop, and the Helliconia trilogy.

    Event details: http://brightonsf.adactio.com/

    Transcript: http://adactio.com/articles/5740/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Letting Go

    Design (or if you prefer—user experience) is at a crossroads. In our globalized, hyper-connected world, users no longer need to wait for us to create experiences for them. As we debate the value of design thinking, the usefulness of the next API, or strive to craft the ultimate cross-platform experience—users are sorting this out on their own, using whatever service or technology is “good enough” for them at the time.

    Strategies and scenarios that made sense mere months ago, are disintegrating as technologies shift, business models crumble, and we watch with dismay as users exchange tips to disable JavaScript on their Kindles, or access multiplayer Flash games on the iPads.

    What happens to your brand, your product, and your bottom line when users choose “good enough”, over your carefully crafted product or service? Is it a sign of failure, a missed opportunity, or a chance to dive head first towards a new reality?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/bryan-stephanie-rieger

    Bryan Rieger is a designer, writer and reluctant developer with a background in theatre design and classical animation. Bryan has worked across various media including print, broadcast, web and mobile; and with clients such as Apple, Microsoft and Nokia.

    Stephanie Rieger is a writer, designer, and closet anthropologist with a passion for the many ways people interact with technology. With a diverse background, Stephanie’s expertise lies in marrying design, technology, and business goals to craft simple, elegant experiences.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  7. Loving Your Player With Juicy Feedback

    The games we love also love us back — mostly, by reflecting our successes and failures in delicious ways. This talk will explore the concept of feedback in game design, using examples drawn from both personal & professional experience. We’ll examine a variety of feedback mechanisms (good and bad), and discuss how lessons drawn from these examples can be applied to any user experience.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/robinhunicke/

    Robin is a Game Designer and Producer who specializes in new IP aimed at reaching new players. Her titles include MySims and Steven Spielberg’s BAFTA award-winning BOOM BLOX franchise — both made for Nintendo Wii. She recently joined thatgamecompany, whose recent Playstation Network releases Flow and Flower are celebrated for their beauty, whimsy and zen-like economy of action.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. Emotional Design for the World of Objects

    Welcome to the world of atoms. Remember when the mantra was that bits were more important than atoms? That we could dispense with physical things because information was all that mattered? Well, that was nonsense then and it is nonsense now.

    The human body is part of the physical world. It savors touch and feeling, movement and action. How else to explain the popularity of physical devices, of games that require gestures, and full-body movement?

    Want to develop for this new world? There are new rules for interacting with the world, new rules for the developers of systems. But the new rules still follow the old principles. Let’s not throw away the old lessons of interaction. In fact, these become even more important than ever before. And yes, there are some new things to learn as well, new technologies to master, new words to learn.

    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

    —Huffduffed by swatik

  9. UX Australia 2011 - Mobile user experience: Methods and tools

    This practical presentation is aimed at helping you get your mobile services into customers’ hands early in the design process, and the different ways of exploring mobile user experiences to better inform your design.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Pocket Scale

    I punch in a keycode and enter the office. Three steps through the door I swipe my travelcard against an old wooden box, which starts spitting out a radio station based on forty million people’s answer to the question ‘What songs would a Joy Division fan like?’ The sexyfuture arrived yesterday, and it colonised my pockets.

    Even on the days you leave your phone at home, you carry enough hacked objects to unlock space and time, provided you find the right door. What should we be thinking about as we bring our products to life? What are we strapping to our keyrings? And what does all of this mean for a scale we’ve been familiar with for centuries?

    Matthew will empty his pockets live at dConstruct to find out, revealing the five things he’s carrying around with him in Brighton and why.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/matthew-sheret

    Writer and editor Matthew Sheret is Last.fm’s Data Griot, using everything from tweets to radio scripts to tell stories about Last.fm’s numbers.

    He has worked for the likes of Newspaper Club, 4iP, Thomson Reuters and Dentsu London and in 2008 co-founded We Are Words Pictures, an ad-hoc team of comic book creators who promote the work of up-and-coming creators.

    In his spare time he edits and publishes the anthology Paper Science and plays with Lego.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct