Come With Me If You Want To Live, or How To Survive A Time Travel Paradox

Possibly related…

  1. dConstruct 2015: Ingrid Burrington

    Jeremy and Ingrid geek out together on the physical infrastructure of the internet, time travel narratives, and William Gibson’s The Peripheral (contains a spoiler warning, but no actual spoilers).

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. dConstruct 2015: Chris Noessel

    This one gets super-nerdy. Jeremy and Chris geek out about interfaces in science fiction films, from Logan’s Run to Iron Man, applying the principle of apologetics along the way. To kick off, Chris humours Jeremy’s crackpot theory about the Star Wars universe, and to wrap up, Chris unveils a very special event taking place the evening before dConstruct.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Gorgeous Catastrophic

    Through the book Make it So (Rosenfeld Media, 2012) and scifiinterfaces.com, Chris has spent years meticulously tracing the lines of influence between designs in sci-fi and the real world. And yes, there are clearly influences. But that does not mean that design in the real world should take its marching orders from sci-fi. Sure, a lot of it is jaw-droppingly beautiful. But some of those same, lovely designs—if implemented—would quickly result in the “usability problems” of severed limbs, munitions craters, mangled bodies, and even the plain old end of the world. Join Chris as he deconstructs enough examples to make us deeply, deeply wary of fetishizing them, and approach sci-fi interfaces with a critical (and still intact) eye.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  7. Eyebeam: James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington

    The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them.

    —Huffduffed by lot49a

  8. One-On-One Conversations: Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle

    The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them. http://anything2mp3.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio