Metadesign For Murph

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  1. dConstruct 2015: John Willshire

    John comes all the way to Brighton to have a face-to-face chat with Jeremy about the troubling ethical questions around who gets to design the future. Together they discuss the contrasting parenting patterns on display in Man Of Steel and Inception. Also: the HR issues raised by Ex Machina and Top Gun.

    Warning: contains mental images of Michael Caine as the interface of the connected home that is the Fortress Of Solitude. Not a lot o’ people know that.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    John Willshire is the founder of innovation studio, Smithery.

    Smithery helps organisations Make Things People Want, rather than Make People Want Things. It lies somewhere on a strange map that features Product & Service Design, Research, Media, Marketing, Innovation and Organisational theory.

    A proponent of a constructionist learning theory (i.e. Making Is Thinking), John has recently completed a new thesis on the relationship in organisations between People and Space, which has spawned a lot of tools, instruments and methods on how you can make the things you want to happen, happen (someone observed one of them “looks a bit… Gallifreyan” which is brilliant.)

    Since 2011, Smithery has worked with numerous people including Konica Minolta, Penguin Random House, The Design Museum, Experian, Oxfam, Google, Carlsberg, Adaptive Lab, Gravity Road, Saïd Business School at The University of Oxford, London College of Communications, The Huffington Post, Royal Mail, Samsung, Google, Channel 4 and Skype.

    John also created Artefact Cards, a way to help people and teams play with ideas, making up card games to find better ideas whilst having more fun. There are now over a million Artefact Cards are now out there in the world, helping people work in new ways, and they’ve been covered by everyone from the Financial Times and Maria Popova’s Brainpickings.

    Prior to founding Smithery, John spent seven years at PHD Media in London, becoming Head of Innovation in 2007 when that wasn’t a thing.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/john-willshire

    —Huffduffed by alastc

  2. dConstruct 2015: Chris Noessel

    This one gets super-nerdy. Jeremy and Chris geek out about interfaces in science fiction films, from Logan’s Run to Iron Man, applying the principle of apologetics along the way. To kick off, Chris humours Jeremy’s crackpot theory about the Star Wars universe, and to wrap up, Chris unveils a very special event taking place the evening before dConstruct.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Gorgeous Catastrophic

    Through the book Make it So (Rosenfeld Media, 2012) and scifiinterfaces.com, Chris has spent years meticulously tracing the lines of influence between designs in sci-fi and the real world. And yes, there are clearly influences. But that does not mean that design in the real world should take its marching orders from sci-fi. Sure, a lot of it is jaw-droppingly beautiful. But some of those same, lovely designs—if implemented—would quickly result in the “usability problems” of severed limbs, munitions craters, mangled bodies, and even the plain old end of the world. Join Chris as he deconstructs enough examples to make us deeply, deeply wary of fetishizing them, and approach sci-fi interfaces with a critical (and still intact) eye.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/chris-noessel

    In his day job at Cooper, Christopher designs products and services for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer; as well as teaching, speaking, and evangelising design internationally. Prior experience includes developing kiosks for museums, helping to visualise the future of counter-terrorism, building prototypes of coming technologies for Microsoft, and designing telehealth.

    His spidey-sense goes off semi-randomly, leading him to speak about a range of things including interactive narrative, ethnographic user research, interaction design, sex-related technologies, free-range learning, generative randomness, and designing for the future.

    He is co-author of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction (Rosenfeld Media 2012), and the force behind the blog scifiinterfaces.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. For Christopher Nolan, Making ‘Interstellar’ Was A Childhood Dream : NPR

    "I got to do a lot of things in this film that I’ve been wanting to do since I was a kid," Nolan says. His new movie has explorers traveling through space to find a new home for humanity.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/07/362351960/christopher-nolan-on-blending-reality-into-fantasy-in-interstellar

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Interstellar spoilers: two critics review Christopher Nolan’s new movie

    On the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full, spoiler-filled detail. Below, our film critic Dana Stevens talks with Forrest Wickman about Interstellar, Christopher Nolan’s new sci-fi epic. Was Nolan able to balance the intergalactic spectacle with the human drama? Are the characters human enough for us to care? Do we even fully understand what happens at the end of the movie?

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2014/11/07/interstellar_spoilers_two_critics_review_christopher_nolan_s_new_movie_audio.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Into the Wormhole: The Science of ‘Interstellar’

    It’s a sci-fi epic set among black holes, wormholes, and tesseracts. But director Christopher Nolan and physicist Kip Thorne say Interstellar doesn’t break the laws of physics.

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/segment/11/21/2014/into-the-wormhole-the-science-of-interstellar.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Designing The Future, John V Willshire, dConstruct 2015

    "Metadesign For Murph" is my talk from dConstruct’s 2015 conference on ‘Designing the Future’ Featuring work from smithery.co & artefactshop.com

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/139401539
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 03 May 2017 13:50:17 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by rianmurnen

  8. Movies used to put Kip Thorne to sleep, then he helped make ‘Interstellar’

    Finding the right balance of science and fiction is one of the biggest challenges to making interesting science-fiction: you want the science to be real enough, but it shouldn’t drag down the story in an overzealous attempt at authenticity. That being said, whenever a big sci-fi flick is released, there are people chomping at the bit to pick apart the movie’s scientific inaccuracies.

    So when it was revealed that Christopher Nolan would be directing "Interstellar" with the help of one of the world’s leading experts on astrophysics and general relativity, it brought a new level of excitement to the project.

    Kip Thorne is an Einstein Medal-winning theoretical physicist and the Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at CalTech. "Interstellar" is his first foray into movie-making and it’s based heavily on his research involving wormholes, time travel and black holes.

    http://www.scpr.org/programs/the-frame/2014/11/26/40532/movies-used-to-put-kip-thorne-to-sleep-then-he-hel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  10. Back To The Future With ‘Total Recall’ Remake : NPR

    Kenneth Turan reviews the film Total Recall, based on a story by Philip K. Dick and a remake of another film from the 1990, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/08/03/157958963/back-to-the-future-with-total-recall-remake

    —Huffduffed by adactio