Everything The Network Touches

Possibly related…

  1. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Tom Coates — Instrumenting your life

    A talk from Webstock 2009 in Wellington, New Zealand.

    http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/tom-coates/instrumenting-your-life/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Materialising and Dematerialising A Web of Data. (Or What We’ve Learned From Printing The Internet Out)

    What’s happening now is that the web of data wants to escape the screen, it wants to materialise into the real world, it wants to get physical, become objects. And that the next exciting stuff is going to be about designing data that can live on the screen, in devices, on paper, as things, wherever.

    So that’s what I’m hoping to talk about. About getting a little post-digital, about analogue friction, about printing to large industrial infrastructures, about unproducts and letter-boxes and rabbits. And there’ll be jokes and silly videos too.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/russelldavies/

    Russell was born in Derby, enjoyed an uneventful childhood, did college, all that. After failing as a popstar and a joke writer he ended up in advertising and tried to do ‘interactive marketing’ way before anyone was interested. Ended up at Wieden Kennedy working on clients like Microsoft, Nike and Honda. Then he went to work for Nike as Global Consumer Planning Director.

    He went freelance in 2006 and works with shadowy organisations like the Open Intelligence Agency and the Really Interesting Group. He also writes eggbaconchipsandbeans occasionally organises ‘Interesting’ conferences, plays with things like speechification, dawdlr and slowpoke and does columns for Campaign magazine and Wired UK.

    If asked what he actually does all day, he’ll normally mutter something about ‘post-digital’.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

    Over 10,000 years ago we lived in balance with the network. Since then we’ve tried to control, rule and bend it to our whims. In all that time, we’ve never asked ourselves if we’re building something that controls us?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/briansuda/

    Brian Suda is an informatician, which is definitely a real word and not just something he made up once. It is perfectly cromulent.

    Brian lives and works in Reykjavík by way of Edinburgh by way of St. Louis. He’s been living in Iceland long enough that he can correctly pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. That’s quite an impressive party trick …unless the party is in Iceland.

    Brian is a data hound, moving from project to project, always finding interesting ways to expose and represent the data exhaust of our network engine. He built one of the earliest microformats parsers and has written a book on Designing With Data.

    Together with Aitor Garcia, Brian has formed Analog. Their first project involves the production of Kickstarter-funded notebooks beautifully embossed with geographical data.

    At some point, he plans to graph all the world‘s baked goods on a hypercube of bread.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. What Is the Shape of the Future Book?

    We will always debate: the quality of the paper, the pixel density of the display; the cloth used on covers, the interface for highlighting; location by page, location by paragraph.

    This is not what matters. Surface is secondary.

    What are the core systems comprising the future book? What are the tools that need to be built?

    As designers we will need to provide the scaffolding for these systems. The interfaces for these tools. Not just as surface, but holistically—understanding the shifting of emotional space, the import of the artifact, the evocation of a souvenir, digitally.

    How will we surface the myriad data just below the words of digital books in organic, clean and deliberately designed ways? How will we shape the future book?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/craig-mod

    Craig Mod is a writer, designer and publisher concerned with the future of books, publishing, and storytelling. He lives in a tiny Bay Area village in the California full of dreamers, endless yogurt, and trees that let loose money when shaken just so. His writing appears mainly on his website, but has also appeared in the New Scientist, The New York Times, and A List Apart. He works as a designer for Flipboard.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. BBC Click: dConstruct: Living with the Network

    How computers and digital technology affect our lives around the world.

    Click investigates triumphs and pitfalls of the digital age at the dConstruct conference.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/digitalp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Let’s See What We Can See (Everybody Online And Looking Good) by Mike Migurski and Ben Cerveny

    Piece by piece, the world is moving onto the web. "Things informationalize," as Stamen advisor Ben Cerveny puts it. How can we make sense of this new torrent of information emerging wide-eyed and blinking into the internet? Stamen’s Michal Migurski will show how information visualization is making it possible to comprehend a live, vast, and deep connected web of data, with a special focus on interactive and geographic work.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/mikemigurski/

    Stamen partner Michal Migurski leads the technical and research aspects of Stamen’s work, moving comfortably from active participation in Stamen’s design process, designing data, prototyping applications, to creating the dynamic projects that Stamen delivers to clients.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/bencerveny/

    Ben Cerveny is a strategic and conceptual advisor to Stamen, helping to articulate an approach toward creative visualization and to evaluate and develop potential partners and engagements relative to that vision.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. Pocket Scale

    I punch in a keycode and enter the office. Three steps through the door I swipe my travelcard against an old wooden box, which starts spitting out a radio station based on forty million people’s answer to the question ‘What songs would a Joy Division fan like?’ The sexyfuture arrived yesterday, and it colonised my pockets.

    Even on the days you leave your phone at home, you carry enough hacked objects to unlock space and time, provided you find the right door. What should we be thinking about as we bring our products to life? What are we strapping to our keyrings? And what does all of this mean for a scale we’ve been familiar with for centuries?

    Matthew will empty his pockets live at dConstruct to find out, revealing the five things he’s carrying around with him in Brighton and why.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/matthew-sheret

    Writer and editor Matthew Sheret is Last.fm’s Data Griot, using everything from tweets to radio scripts to tell stories about Last.fm’s numbers.

    He has worked for the likes of Newspaper Club, 4iP, Thomson Reuters and Dentsu London and in 2008 co-founded We Are Words Pictures, an ad-hoc team of comic book creators who promote the work of up-and-coming creators.

    In his spare time he edits and publishes the anthology Paper Science and plays with Lego.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Rachel Kalmar on data ecosystems - O’Reilly Radar

    In this new episode of the Hardware Podcast, David Cranor and I talk with data scientist Rachel Kalmar, formerly with Misfit Wearables and the founder and organizer of the Sensored Meetup in San Francisco. She shares insights from her work at the intersection of data, hardware, and health care.

    http://radar.oreilly.com/2016/02/rachel-kalmar-on-data-ecosystems.html

    —Huffduffed by albill