Tagged with “technology” (445)

  1. Claire Evans – Mother Internet

    Technology writer Claire Evans talks about her new book “Broad Band: The Untold Story of Women Who Made the Internet.”

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEHlRqdohY8
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:04:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. Track Changes: Who Really Made The Internet?: Claire L. Evans on Tech History

    How did cyberpunks and activists affect the tech industry? Do we understand the history of the internet? How much of what we know comes only from a man’s perspective? This week, Claire L. Evans tells us about her new book, Broad Band, and the women who created the internet.

    There Were Women In The Room: This week Paul Ford and Gina Trapani sit down with Claire L. Evans to chat about her new book,

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. We discuss the impact of online communities, how weird the dot-com era was, and the stories of the women who made things work. We also get a window into Y△CHT’s future project — the Broad Band Musical!

    2:29 — Claire: “[This book is] a corrective if you will, of all the books we’ve all read and love about Silicon Valley, and the garage-to-riches stories of entrepreneurship… These are the stories about the women who were in the room the whole time, and nobody asked about them.”

    5:06 — Paul: “Women get forgotten from activist histories too, and it was kind of an activist scene in the early days.”

    5:22 — Gina: “Weird was welcome, in a way that is no longer the case.”

    7:03 — Claire: “My big takeaway is how little we value long-term care and maintenance when it comes to building things… I profile Stacy Horn, who founded Echo BBS in the late 90s. It still exists. And she has devoted 25 years of her life to fostering and caring for this community. … She’s taking care of something, because she’s responsible for a community, and I think that’s really beautiful.”

    8:24— Claire: “We mythologize the box, but it’s the users that change the world; it’s what you do with it. The culture work, the development of making things worth linking is almost as important as making the conventions for linking.

    8:24 — Gina: “It’s broadening the definition of what making the web was. It wasn’t just about standardizing protocols and running code, it was about building the places where people wanted to come and connect and share.”

    9:07— Paul: “Moderation…it’s critical, it’s key to these communities but it doesn’t get as much appreciation as ‘I wrote a page of code.’”

    20:51 — Claire: “We’re all very siloed in the contemporary media landscape.”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/who-really-made-the-internet-claire-l-evans-on-techhistory

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  3. Can science fiction predict our economic future?

    Companies take a deep dive into the stacks of a sci-fi library to find out how we might react to new tech.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/04/12/business/can-science-fiction-predict-future

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  4. New Space | Dell Technologies United States

    Prepare for liftoff. In this episode we go deep into space: into the known unknowns we’ve explored, and the unknown unknowns that lie ahead.

    https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/perspectives/podcasts/trailblazers/s02-e04-new-space.htm#autoplay=false&autoexpand=true&episode=203&transcript=false

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  5. Longform Podcast #289: Craig Mod · Longform

    Craig Mod is a writer and photographer. His podcast is On Margins.

    “You pick up an iPad, you pick up an iPhone—what are you picking up? You’re picking up a chemical-driven casino that just plays on your most base desires for vanity and ego and our obsession with watching train wrecks happen. That’s what we’re picking up and it’s counted in pageviews, because—not to be reductive and say that it’s a capitalist issue, but when you take hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, and you’re building models predicated on advertising, you are gonna create fucked-up algorithms and shitty loops that take away your attention. And guess what? You need to engage with longform texts. You need control of your attention. And so I think part of what subverted our ability to find this utopian reading space is the fact that so much of what’s on these devices is actively working to destroy all of the qualities needed to create that space.”

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-289-craig-mod

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  6. Inside the OED: can the world’s biggest dictionary survive the internet? —€“ podcast | News | The Guardian

    For centuries, lexicographers have attempted to capture the entire English language. Technology might soon turn this dream into reality â—but will it spell the end for dictionaries?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/mar/16/inside-the-oed-can-the-worlds-biggest-dictionary-survive-the-internet-podcast

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  7. Why Paper Jams Persist | The New Yorker

    Joshua Rothman writes about how a trivial problem reveals the limits of technology.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/02/12/why-paper-jams-persist?currentPage=all

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  8. BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific, Stephanie Shirley on computer coding

    As a young woman, Stephanie Shirley worked at the Dollis Hill Research Station building computers from scratch: but she told young admirers that she worked for the Post Office, hoping they would think she sold stamps. In the early 60s she changed her name to Steve and started selling computer programmes to companies who had no idea what they were or what they could do, employing only mothers who worked from home writing code by hand with pen and pencil and then posted it to her. By the mid-80s her software company employed eight thousand people, still mainly women with children. She made an absolute fortune but these days Stephanie thinks less about making money and much more about how best to give it away.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pmvl8

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  9. How does the internet work? Julia Evans on CodeNewbie

    You type in a url and you get a website. But how did you get that website? What are all the little steps that happen when you request a page and (hopefully) see that page in your browser? Julia Evans breaks down how the internet works and gives us an amazing introduction to computer networking.

    Julia is a software developer who lives in Montreal. She works on infrastructure at Stripe, gives talks and has published a collection of awesome free programming zines.

    https://www.codenewbie.org/podcast/how-does-the-internet-work

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  10. Claire L. Evans, Author of Broad Band- The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet | Internet History Podcast

    Claire Evans is the author of the new book: Broad Band The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. This is the best tech history book I’ve read in a while and you know I read them all. Of special note, considering our 90s-heavy focus on this podcast, the book includes the stories of Word.com, which was a competitor to Feed.com (which we’ve previously covered) and Women.com which was a competitor to Ivillage (which, again, we’ve spoke at length about). But you also get an amazing portair of tech in the 1970s, hypertext as a movement outside of the web, and stories about amazing women like Grace Hopper and Jake Feinler.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2018/03/claire-l-evans-author-of-broad-band-the-untold-story-of-the-women-who-made-the-internet/

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