Tagged with “future” (129)

  1. Caravans in Space

    Is the Earth too perfect? The Moon too grey? Mars too dusty? Then how about setting up a human colony in the depths of space?

    Richard Hollingham travels to the Tennessee Valley Interstellar Workshop in Chattanooga, Tennessee to meet scientists, engineers, doctors and anthropologists planning human colonies in space and spaceships that will take humanity to the stars.

    These are not dreamers - although they all have an ambitious dream - but well qualified experts. Several work at Nasa, others have day jobs at universities and research institutes.

    Richard hears of proposals to build giant space stations and worldships - vessels packed with the best of humanity. These caravans in space might be lifeboats to escape an approaching asteroid or perhaps the first step to colonising the galaxy.


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  2. Kevin Kelly: The Next 30 Digital Years - The Long Now

    IN KEVIN KELLY’S VIEW, a dozen “inevitable” trends will drive the next 30 years of digital progress. Countless artificial smartnesses, for example, will be added to everything, all quite different from human intelligence and from each other. We will tap into them like we do into electricity to become cyber-centaurs — co-dependent humans and AIs. All of us will need to perpetually upgrade just to stay in the game.

    Every possible surface that can become a display will become a display, and will study its watchers. Everything we encounter, “if it cannot interact, it is broken.” Virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) will become the next platform after smartphones, conveying a profound sense of experience (and shared experience), transforming education (“it burns different circuits in your brain”), and making us intimately trackable. Everything will be tracked, monitored, sensored, and imaged, and people will go along with it because “vanity trumps privacy,”as already proved on Facebook. “Wherever attention flows, money will follow.”

    Access replaces ownership for suppliers as well as consumers. Uber owns no cars; AirBnB owns no real estate. On-demand rules. Sharing rules. Unbundling rules. Makers multiply. “In thirty years the city will look like it does now because we will have rearranged the flows, not the atoms. We will have a different idea of what a city is, and who we are, and how we relate to other people.”

    In the Q&A, Kelly was asked what worried him. “Cyberwar,” he said. “We have no rules. Is it okay to take out an adversary’s banking system? Disasters may have to occur before we get rules. We’re at the point that any other civilization in the galaxy would have a world government. I have no idea how to do that.”

    Kelly concluded: “We are at the beginning of the beginning — the first hour of day one. There have never been more opportunities. The greatest products of the next 25 years have not been invented yet.

    “You‘re not late.“

    —Stewart Brand


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  3. Kevin Kelly: How technology evolves | TED Talk | TED.com

    Tech enthusiast Kevin Kelly asks "What does technology want?" and discovers that its movement toward ubiquity and complexity is much like the evolution of life.


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  4. The Economist asks: Can the open web survive?

    Sir Tim Berners Lee founded the web in 1989, and is now the head of its standards agency, the W3C. He joins deputy editor Tom Standage in The Economist studio to discuss the future of his creation.

    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/theeconomist/the-economist-asks-can-the-open-web-survive
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. William Gibson, part one by A Phone Call From Paul | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    In part one of Paul Holdengraber’s conversation with William Gibson topics include the future, the past, and how weird and cool the phone is.


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  6. Seeing into the Future: A Practitioner’s View | Public Radio International

    Figuring out the future starts by paying attention to signals in the present. And based on the signals already apparent today, says Institute for the Future Executive Director Marina Gorbis, expect smart algorithms and networks of individuals to matter more, and centralized institutions to matter less.



    Tagged with iftf future

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  7. Featuring William Gibson | Hazlitt

    Living among the ruins of past futures with William Gibson.


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  8. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.


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  9. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.


    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.


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  10. dConstruct 2015: Brian David Johnson

    In which Jeremy is won over by Brian’s boundless enthusiasm and energy in the face of an uncertain future. Also: robots. Always with the robots.


    The future is Brian David Johnson’s business. As a futurist he develops an actionable 10-15 year vision for the future of technology and what it will feel like to live in the future. His work is called “futurecasting”—using ethnographic field studies, technology research, trend data, and even science fiction to provide a pragmatic vision of consumers and computing. Johnson works with governments, militaries, trade organizations, start-ups and multinational corporations to help them envision their future. He was appointed first futurist ever at the Intel Corporation in 2009.

    Johnson speaks and writes extensively about future technologies in articles (The Wall Street Journal, Slate, IEEE Computer, Successful Farming) and both science fiction and fact books (21st Century Robot, Vintage Tomorrows, Science Fiction Prototyping, and Fake Plastic Love). Johnson lectures around the world and teaches as a professor at The University of Washington and The California College of the Arts MBA program. He appears regularly on Bloomberg TV, PBS, FOX News, and the Discovery Channel and has been featured in Scientific American, The Technology Review, Forbes, INC, and Popular Science. He has directed two feature films and is an illustrator and commissioned painter.

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